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  2. All of Manhattanville’s gen 1s retired last night: 6383, 6418, 6423. with that, there are no more 2003 orions left... FWIW 6383 and 6423 both retired off the M5, not sure what 6418 retired off of since that ran in the morning but not the evening.
  3. I mean, Deuce stated that it has some problems, replying someone asking if it is on local service and I didn't have to know if it's a maintenaince shop or a bus vendor(also I don't belong in his depot). I mean't to keep that as a short surprise, but I asked him if there's any news on it(checking if it was fixed), so I left that alone.
  4. The Uncle Floyd Show (hard to find, but they're out there) Family Guy The Honeymooners
  5. I already shared it to my peeps on Discord. What I am not happy with is that, they scrapped #1004 due to it's decommisioning and I had to panic a little. #1004 is the most important to show how the artic milestone started(even though that unit in that series of 1996-98 are my least favs). But now #5534(one of my favorite unit) gets to be saved as the first 60ft bus in collection, I hope they stated as the the first bus model of artic buses in history on the museum info.
  6. I lived near the Kew-Forest section for a few years. My apt window would overlook K-F. I now live 'down the 'pike', so to speak, but I'm hardly on the E and F, now. Side note - When I was lazy and wanted a seat, or the subways were delayed, I'd travel with the X's (X63, X64, or X68). I always felt like I was breaking the driver's stride when I'd flag them down. I always felt like they did not want to stop at 78 Ave. I took the QM18 westbound only once....its too slow.
  7. https://gothamist.com/2019/06/17/mta_subway_pride_weekend.php
  8. In this day and age, light rail construction works best when a neighborhood is built from the ground up. I'm thinking of the Hudson-Bergan Light Rail. When it was built, Jersey City and Bayonne had the capacity (space) to build it w/o traffic or NIMBY concerns. As for having light rail on the Q10 and Q46, it's not ideal. The Q10 corridor in Kew Gardens and Richmond Hill is too crowded. Also, what happens if the bus has to go off route due to construction or an accident? As for the Q46, they should stay with the 40 ft vehicles and assign more drivers and buses to the route. Also, I could see quite a bit of opposition to any additional road construction on Union Tpke...esp the further east one gets from Kew Gardens.
  9. A lot of those practices come from B division towers. If you key a signal without permission in the A division ATS knows.
  10. Today
  11. trains are running regular service and the is running this weekend due to the pride parade, according to the countdown clocks.
  12. Thanks for echoing my thoughts -- the MTA caused its current situation, and basically has done nothing to rectify the damage they've caused. But let's not forget to place blame with the DOT, their partner in crime. Maybe some should also go on the King's out of control Parking Placard program, taking away spaces from residents/potential payers. I really think the bunching problems can be directly attributable to the DOT, especially in Queens. Both the MTA and DOT have known about the problem areas (MTA routes haven't changed in years along the major corridors/transfer areas), and yet for all of the "experts" on payroll at DOT, nothing can be done? And I am NOT sold on their "solution" of just slapping down bus lanes, purely because they seem to think everything's going to be fine since everyone will operate on the "honor system" and let buses only use the lanes -- so no enforcement monies are put into those plans. Plus, when ticket prices are put out, they get watered-down. IIRC the 14th Street "experiment" was supposed to have a $150 violation, but now it's $50 (which, if converted to outside-NYC dollars, is around a twenty) -- who's really going to bat an eye at that when "justifying" it to themselves at the time of deciding to flaunt the law? The MTA is almost in an impossible situation all around.
  13. I think cutting off the museum would probably be an idea not even Cuomo would go for considering the uproar from not only MTA employees and railfanners, but also preservationists and maybe even parents who often take their children there.
  14. Hello everyone! This topic is from 2017. I just want to get on my grind to post as much bus and transit information as possible that hasn't been posted here. I want everyone to be inform of what's happening outside the tristate area, thanks. If you have been on some DDOT buses lately you probably know some of them are getting pretty long in the tooth. The Detroit Department of Transportation (DDOT) is working to fix that. It has added of 100 new buses over past three years and is putting another 20 on the road over the next few months to improve reliability and reduce the average age, according to DDOT Director Dan Dirks. The new buses have been arriving over the past several weeks and nine more will hit the streets in January. “This is another important step forward for DDOT and it strives to continually provide better service to its customers and younger, more reliable buses on the road,” Dirks says. “Our plan is to purchase at least 20 new buses each year for the next five years to get the age of our fleet in line with other major transit systems.” The new buses will bring the average age of vehicles in the DDOT fleet to about eight years, down from an average age of more than 12 years when Dirks took over in 2014. He says the ideal average age for buses in a transit system of Detroit’s size is about six years There are currently about 300 buses in the DDOTs fleet with 240 buses are on the road at peak times. The rest are getting routine maintenance. The new buses are New Flyer XD40 models and they come with destination signs on the rear, large rear windows and skylight roof hatches to allow more natural light on the interior, and an additional security camera on the exterior. Since adding its first 80 new buses in 2015, DDOT has implemented its largest service expansion in nearly two decades (1,500 additional weekly trips), including: Adding 9 new 24-hour routes (previously there were none). Adding 6 new express routes to connect neighborhoods across the city to major job centers in downtown and midtown. Adding a new Fresh Wagon route that provides direct roundtrip bus service to Eastern Market every Saturday with 6 convenient pickup locations across Detroit. Adding a new Mid-City Loop route to connect more low-income neighborhoods in the central part of the city with the jobs and amenities of the new center and midtown areas. Partnering with RTA and SMART to provide express “Reflex” service to and from the suburbs along Woodward and Gratiot Avenue. Security cameras have also been installed on the inside and outside of all buses and there is now a dedicated transit police force. Those two features have significantly improved safety across the transit system, DDOT says. Job opportunities DDOT has hired more than 100 bus drivers in 2017. The starting wage for bus drivers is currently $12.69 – $18.29 hourly, including benefits. To be eligible for a bus driver position with DDOT, applicants must have the following qualifications: Completion of high school or G.E.D. Must be able to obtain a Michigan Commercial Driver’s License with Group A or B designation and Passenger and Air Brake endorsements Preferably, two years of experience operating automotive vehicles, as demonstrated by a State Driving Record All persons interested in employment opportunities with DDOT are encouraged to apply for the Transportation Equipment Operator (Bus Driver) positions at https://www.detroitmi.gov/employment
  15. Hello everyone! This topic is from 2017. I just want to get on my grind to post as much bus and transit information as possible that hasn't been posted here. I want everyone to be inform of what's happening outside the tristate area, thanks. If you have been on some DDOT buses lately you probably know some of them are getting pretty long in the tooth. The Detroit Department of Transportation (DDOT) is working to fix that. It has added of 100 new buses over past three years and is putting another 20 on the road over the next few months to improve reliability and reduce the average age, according to DDOT Director Dan Dirks. The new buses have been arriving over the past several weeks and nine more will hit the streets in January. “This is another important step forward for DDOT and it strives to continually provide better service to its customers and younger, more reliable buses on the road,” Dirks says. “Our plan is to purchase at least 20 new buses each year for the next five years to get the age of our fleet in line with other major transit systems.” The new buses will bring the average age of vehicles in the DDOT fleet to about eight years, down from an average age of more than 12 years when Dirks took over in 2014. He says the ideal average age for buses in a transit system of Detroit’s size is about six years There are currently about 300 buses in the DDOTs fleet with 240 buses are on the road at peak times. The rest are getting routine maintenance. The new buses are New Flyer XD40 models and they come with destination signs on the rear, large rear windows and skylight roof hatches to allow more natural light on the interior, and an additional security camera on the exterior. Since adding its first 80 new buses in 2015, DDOT has implemented its largest service expansion in nearly two decades (1,500 additional weekly trips), including: Adding 9 new 24-hour routes (previously there were none). Adding 6 new express routes to connect neighborhoods across the city to major job centers in downtown and midtown. Adding a new Fresh Wagon route that provides direct roundtrip bus service to Eastern Market every Saturday with 6 convenient pickup locations across Detroit. Adding a new Mid-City Loop route to connect more low-income neighborhoods in the central part of the city with the jobs and amenities of the new center and midtown areas. Partnering with RTA and SMART to provide express “Reflex” service to and from the suburbs along Woodward and Gratiot Avenue. Security cameras have also been installed on the inside and outside of all buses and there is now a dedicated transit police force. Those two features have significantly improved safety across the transit system, DDOT says. Job opportunities DDOT has hired more than 100 bus drivers in 2017. The starting wage for bus drivers is currently $12.69 – $18.29 hourly, including benefits. To be eligible for a bus driver position with DDOT, applicants must have the following qualifications: Completion of high school or G.E.D. Must be able to obtain a Michigan Commercial Driver’s License with Group A or B designation and Passenger and Air Brake endorsements Preferably, two years of experience operating automotive vehicles, as demonstrated by a State Driving Record All persons interested in employment opportunities with DDOT are encouraged to apply for the Transportation Equipment Operator (Bus Driver) positions at https://www.detroitmi.gov/employment
  16. 16xx here as well. 1500's got called for 2nd PE last week. I feel like we are right on the cusp....
  17. This is devastating information to hear, hopefully this plan will be more of a pesky rumor. And much less reality, since the museum is really iconic of the modern MTA
  18. Bad news to share. I'm honestly praying that this is just a rumor and nothing more. They know well that everybody loves that place.
  19. Tail tracks were proposed for the former in 1968 (and subsequently rejected, as much of the funding needed had not been approved on the 1971 ballot), and the idea briefly resurfaced in 1989. As for the latter, I've heard nothing about tail tracks beyond some people on this very site saying that they should be implemented at the very least (which I agree with).
  20. Sure, at the cost of the people at a good chunk of intermediate stations for a single hour in the peak direction. The fact of the matter is, plenty of people will be off the train at Broadway Junction, as large numbers of those riders aren't looking for the Financial District (not to say that the number is necessarily close to 0, but let's be realistic here). Moreover, if we want anything close to more service during the rush, we should look for ways to facilitate short-turns at Woodhaven Boulevard (these would run to/from Chambers Street as a supplement to the regular , which would effectively require killing skip-stop, anyway).
  21. The only thing I would suggest is making those gaps a bit narrower (assuming that enough space is still left for people to get through while open). That'll make it harder for people to attempt to slip through. I'm glad I'm not the only one that thought of these gates. They're better than the turnstiles (especially those damn HEETs, which are a real nuisance to use on occasion, to say nothing of the day-to-day).
  22. How many times are you going to try to push that bullshit?
  23. My list# is 163X. Any idea when they will be hitting me up for Second PE Thanks
  24. I just want to clarify something about this endless fare beating issue...so when fare beaters get ticked with a 100 dollar fine, does that money go straight to the or does it just go straight to the feds?
  25. Skip stop service shouldn’t have to end on the and lines just so that a Nassau Street to Bay Ridge route can work. It takes forever to get from Jamaica Center to Lower Manhattan on the and so any time that can be shaved off is welcomed.
  26. firstly, I'm an employee that honestly appreciate cuomo at least addressing the assaults on employees, regardless of union, title or seniority. personally, i taken the stance (as I've previously stated in other topics) over the past (now) 10 years that i will never address anyone regarding the non payment of the fare. i press F5 and keep it pushing. with that said, there's personnel in place to address fare beating. whether or not they (the powers that be) choose to utilize said personnel is management's issue/problem. whether or not said personnel is utilized effectively is a tactical problem... again, not my problem, so to speak. that's not what I'm qualified or paid to do. i can make suggestions like anyone else or offer opinions. unless they deploy officers, be it MTA police, NYPD, NY staties, MTA B&T, eagle team (MTA security) whatever... on every run on every bus line or at/in every station, there will never be an end to fare evasion. i understand that may not be the goal (an absolute end to fare beating) and if certain measures can be taken to significantly reduce the amount of fare evasion while preventing employee assaults, I'm all for it. to be honest, anything that can be done to reduce the amount of negative interactions between the knuckleheads and transit employees needs to happen. will it be effective? possibly. but doing nothing or tying things up due to rhetoric and expecting things to magically change is insanity. my issue regarding the subway system is the NYPD's efficiency. for example, NYPD officers being deployed at Euclid Avenue to deter fare beating is all well & good. however, people (criminals/fare beaters) aren't stupid. one stop away, grant avenue, there's rampant fare beating... has been for years. i can't remember the last officer I've seen there. the cops have to be willing to deploy/investigate trends. if incidents of fare beating drop at a station where it once was an issue, logic would dictate that it's migrated elsewhere... usually extremely closeby. do the homework, and be a constant deterrent.
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