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Showing content with the highest reputation on 03/02/2021 in all areas

  1. 3041, 3048, 3064, 3122, 3233 to scrap
    3 points
  2. As you guys are aware I'm sure, Toronto has had trainsets with the gangway in operation since 2011. My question still to this day about these trainsets, is does the gangway overall serve a better purpose than keeping all the cars contained? Yes, in theory people should be able to stand in the gangway, and Toronto's gangways even have poles at all four corners of the gangway: Standing in the gangway may seem ideal in theory during a crush load, But try standing in the gangway during the "S-curve" which follows Spadina station southbound into St. George station and then into Museum. Or similarly, during the "horn" that surrounds Union station. I honestly don't see how anyone can stand safely there. Even a minor s curve of sorts which occurs immediately south of College Station, I nearly got thrown over from the gangway. Methinks that the MTA will probably have a lawsuit on their hands from someone being injured in a gangway. While I haven't been downtown since COVID started, I used to take the subway from the 2017 extension, another side effect that comes with these open trains is for the panhandlers and other eccentrics to basically wander the whole train bothering everyone. At least with isolated units they couldn't wander the whole train. So yeah, if you find yourself in uncomfortable situations, the entire train is fair game rather than individual cars. There were times before in Toronto albeit rarely, where I made a mad dash at a stop to get to the next car. Finally, from a transit enthusiast perspective, let's be honest, while this doesn't really matter functionality, these train sets as proposed removed the rail fan window, so gone are the days where you can look out the front and see the signals. (Which brings me to ATC, where signals would become almost pointless anyways). You can still kind of see through the one way mirror now on the Toronto Rocket but it's a very limited view. So these are my thoughts on the gangway trains.
    2 points
  3. It mostly just sounds like you're fishing for people to go along with your excuses rather than actually engaging a debate. Three feet of space is three feet of space. Compared to a 60 foot car, that is 5% of space.
    2 points
  4. I feel this has its roots in the old 2-car married pair system. Quite frankly, I always felt that the claims of the benefit of having 2-car sets vs. 5-car sets were overblown. It might have worked best in the past when there were very clear morning and afternoon peaks coupled with quiet middays, but with the future of the work force being the hybrid WFH-in-person, the number of passengers in the peak will be reduced. The need for rearranging sets hasn't even been a thing in decades and it certainly won't be needed now for almost all services (with the exception of the night shuttles). The homeless/panhandler issue is something that people just love to raise. That's a city problem, it's not an inherently open-gangway problem. The gangways might make it a little easier, but doors or no doors, they'll will always go from car to car. Doors haven't stopped panhandlers in wheelchairs from trying to pass between cars by using those doors. But you know what doors have done? They have stopped the normal, average wheechair user from going between cars. Your average Joe in the wheelchair doesn't exactly feel like risking it.
    2 points
  5. I mean the BMT pioneered the very concept. This isn’t as “new and unknown” as some people think. My soon to be 63 year old mother was 7 when the D Types were retired. There’s an entire generation who grew up riding the rails of the old BMT Southern Division on those cars.
    2 points
  6. To the new jacks, welcome aboard. Enjoy Schoolcar. It was a blast. I am still close with my T/O classmates, and my TSS classmates. Ask the questions. It's better to ask instead of not knowing, doing something dumb, and then having to talk to people like me. Turn your brain into a sponge. Learn from the good ones so you know what to do, and learn from the bad ones so you know what NOT to do. I have an open door policy, so feel free to pick my brain if you see me out there in the field. (I'm on the PMs, on 3 of the 4 lines that have a yellow bullet.) And be careful out there.
    2 points
  7. Although extremely high (even if it wasn't for covid), it looks like there might be a shift change at the Amazon facility around that time.
    1 point
  8. The " so-called" railfans are rather ignorant when it comes to certain things. Would this new concept be an improvement over the rolling stock now in use ? I don't pretend to know the answer. I do see the concept as limiting the option of running trainsets of differing lengths where full length trains aren't needed. Just my opinion. Carry on.
    1 point
  9. I've been on Brampton Transit's Zum Articulated buses plenty of times in the past. An express version of the route uses Hwy 407, and this bus is usually packed. Anyways, I remember standing up in the gangway there, which for starters was much smaller than a gangway seen in the Toronto Rocket or R211 mockup. I've stood up in such a gangway before on a packed bus travelling down Hwy 407 at full speed. What I noticed about the articulated buses is that they don't seem to have the same kind of "swing" as the gangways in the subways do. A bus isn't going to hit a sudden s-curve in the tracks like a subway train can. Any full turns in a bus will be at very slow speeds. Meanwhile in Toronto, I'm not 100% sure of this, but the S-curve immediately south of College Station before reaching Dundas Station on Line 1 happens at a speed somewhere between 20-30 mph, possibly more. I'm sure most of us on this site have a mental map of the trackage in our heads where we go, but for the vast majority of people who aren't transit geeks, unanticipated movements in the gangway can shock someone. I don't know, with my experience of articulated buses (I have a friend who's father spent his whole life at the TTC and he called them 'slinky buses') is that they don't seem to have the same kind of "swing" and off balance feeling that the Toronto Rocket trains do. The difference here, from what I can see is that the old D Types had a gangway that was roughly the size of the passage between trains anyways. Standing in such a spot would not be encouraged at all. The gangway in the TR and R211 is much wider and with such wide space, it encourages the behavior of standing inside the gangway. Also, regarding the Toronto Rocket, you can see in those photos how the trains were poorly designed, they had to add those rubber grips because many people complained that there's few spaces to "hang on" in those trains, particularly under the AC units.
    1 point
  10. The thread for R262 train discussion is at the following link. Please make use of it.
    1 point
  11. The thread for R262 train discussion is at the following link. Please make use of it.
    1 point
  12. “Mandates” don’t matter. Winning does. https://youtu.be/cGZa-yf8vMU
    1 point
  13. 0 points
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