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nipaaaa

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  1. Good question. I consider myself a night owl and stay up late playing video games and whatnot (having fun). However when it comes 4-5 am and "working", I just shut down. When I was fresh out of schoolcar, I was also put in midnights. A typical day for me would be to be on standby as early as 11 pm. Then they give me a full 10 hour job that starts at 1 am until 12 pm. It was absolute madness and I drowned in misery from 4 am onward. Oh and it was a job with 4 roundtrip driving duties too so it was really dangerous but I just bit the bullet.
  2. i have 2 friends who scored 85 on this test, their list numbers are in the 5000s
  3. that's because these jobs are not from the MTA themselves. They are contracted out to private companies
  4. well i'm just telling you from experience that I've seen mad people with f**ked up driving records that were still hired. You'd probably had to have killed someone in an accident for them to disqualify you
  5. yes it's ok, your driving record has nothing to do with the job
  6. I didn't know this title is for all those departments. I said what I said cuz my friend is in signals and that's all i knew
  7. lol this job has nothing to do with electricity or engineering, you're just a flagger for the signal maintainers
  8. yea it's a sad state of affairs
  9. Except the conversations in question aren't actually about the "pre-probationary period" or "pre school car stages" or even school car for that matter. These people are way passed those points in time and were talking about life at work. Consequently, if the topics of discussion were about school car, there is an existing thread that that dates back to 2012. All I'm doing is trying to organize information where they belong so people can quickly and seamlessly find it. Any information that one might seek about the hiring process has already been answered and/or discussed more than once and the process hasn't changed since page 1. All one has to do is use the search function or put in the time to read from page 1 like I did. If you don't have the patience or time to sift through so many pages, then the solution is to reduce the number of pages that don't contain the relevant content.
  10. not to bust anyone's chops but if ya'll want to just chat among yourselves about transit life, make a whatsapp group. This thread is to provide info for the hiring process and to update the movement of the list.
  11. Yes lol, that little notch in the brake, do not let it go if you feel momentum still pushing the train. This is especially true on down grade stations. Once you feel that the train is really coasting without the momentum (with still some brake), then it's ok to release all the air for the final full service brake to fully stop. Sometimes if you grab just the right amount of brake, you won't even need to release all the air and you'll be able to come to a stop while still holding like 10-15 psi. With time, you'll know if the train is still being pushed by momentum. You really gotta focus and feel the train, once you can do that, then 68A is nothing. I'm not saying I'm an expert but that's how I need operate in order to control them.
  12. they can fail you for off centered brake stem? wow. Yea handbrakes are pretty important. I heard over the radio today on the road that a train was in smokes at union square and the crew said a handbrake was partially applied. Whoever did that put in from city hall is gonna be trouble.
  13. The 32 controllers are stiffer to press down. And yes, I definitely suggest wearing protection especially dumping the 32s. If you get a chance, go to any terminal and ask for some earplugs. Even the release of air hurts me.
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