Jump to content
Attention: In order to reply to messages, create topics, have access to other features of the community you must sign up for an account.

gregorygrice

Veteran Member
  • Content Count

    1,345
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Posts posted by gregorygrice


  1. MTA railroads have a ticket you can buy that's a round trip one side and a 2 ride MetroCard on the other. Look it up. You also have to keep in mind that these are all different agencies. Subway and buses are run by NYCTA & MTA bus. MNR & LIRR are railroads and are completely desperate from NYCTA besides them being owned by the same company.

    • Upvote 1

  2. BN is a yard. The yard is used to unload/load the garbage train from GCT and the East Side Access Materials Train.

     

    Croton North is a station no longer in use. Montrose was a completely different station which is also not in use. Was replaced by Cortland Station.


  3. At this time, there are currently no plans to re extend the Harlem Line. Trackage past Wassaic has been torn up and turned into a biking trail. (Rail Trail) There was also a plan in 2007 to extend MNR service past Poughkeepsie but that was scrapped as well.

    • Upvote 1

  4. Correct. Read the description of this video:

     

     

     

    Apparently LIRR even needs NYAR permission for emergency equipment moves and they aren't just rubber-stamping.

     

    Well the move that day wasn't so much an emergency. They just wanted to get the equipment out while they had an on-duty protect crew.

     

     

    Also here is a kinda recent video of LIRR in Fresh Pond:

      The section of the yard you see him pull out of @ 3:42 is the section that NYAR gave to LIRR to store their cars.

  5. LIRR sold the Lower Montauk months ago. As a result no LIRR trains operate on the branch except for MOW trains with MP15s and SW's. NYAR gives LIRR yard space at Fresh Pond to store MOW cars (gondolas, welded rail cars, etc). But still LIRR must obtain permission from NYAR to use the branch.


  6. Long term after ESA full implementation would allow LIRR trains to in theory interline with MNRR trains which would drastically reduce operating expenses big time so a moving shoe would be a good mid to long-term investment just not for now.

    The ESA isnt going to interline the two railroads. Like the above poster stated, it's way below the lower level. The LIRR ESA line is only for one Branch anyway. Customers will have to transfer for other branches. Also take into account that even though these railroads are both managed by the MTA, they are almost completely different in how the run down to the "watch the gap" announcement.

    • Upvote 2

  7. The 3rd rail for top running shoes is mounted to the bracket via the bottom of the 3rd rail.

     

    The 3rd rail for bottom running shoes is mountedf to the bracket via the top of the 3rd rail.

     

    I am asking if instead of mounting the 3rd rail from the top, shown here:

    Derde_rail.jpg

     

    or having bottom mounting, shown here:

    Third_rail_pickup.jpg

     

    Note the green box, it is the bottom mounting.

     

    I propose mounting the 3rd rail from outside (side not facing the track) onto a bracket similiar to the method used to mount bottom running 3rd rail.

    Oh I see what you are saying now, so that both MNR and LIRR trains can utilize the same third rail. Great suggestion. Now we would just have to figure power issues. LIRR uses 750 and MNR use 700.


  8. I know that the LIRR used top running 3rd rail shoes. I also know that MNRR uses under-running 3rd rail shoes.

     

    If the 3rd rail were mounted on the side rather from the top or bottom, would both systems become compatible?

    Third rail can not be contacted through the side because of several reasons one being the loss of power while hitting curves and if the cars sway it would cause damage to the third rail. Having that wouldn't really cut spending. Think of how much it would cost to replace the whole MTA railroad system with side running third rail.

    • Upvote 2

  9. There is a decent supply of M3's here. You mainly see them on the Harlem and New Haven lines. You'd never get M3 on the Hudson Line. They are in pretty good condition.

     

     

    If you saw M3s on the New Haven Line, then you saw something rare because M3s don't have pantographs making it impossible to run over there. They are mostly seen on the Harlem because they are taken care of at North White Plains Yard. Next place to catch them is the Hudson Line. WEEKDAYS ONLY (unless there is a weekend with extra service requiring them)


  10. For your reference, they are going at a rate of 8 cars a month, starting with M2s. This process has already started. If you want a hint at what cars are going out next, head to Stamford Yard (by street of course) and look at the "dead track". You will see cars that have been stripped and prepared for shipping to Ohio for scrap.


  11. Well to start off the stations you listed are on the Hudson Line. The platforms are only long enough to fit 4 cars, that's why they tell you to move up if getting off. Now those platforms aren't regular sized because of the low ridership it recieves. Why build an 8-12 car platform for a station that recieves little passengers?

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.