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+Young+

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Everything posted by +Young+

  1. Yeah, even for the last couple of Bus Operator protests sessions I went to, I think the maximum amount of people that were there were about five.
  2. It is definitely worth it!! I have attended the protest session for the last couple of exams, and to recap what happened: After taking the elevator to the 4th Floor, the personnel at the door will ask to see your "Candidate's Record of Answers" from the exam. They may temporarily take it, however they will give it back. They are eventually going to lead us to a room. The last protest session was held in a smaller conference room, the second to last protest session was held in the standard classroom. In this room, besides signing in, they are going to give us the test booklet, memory booklet, the proposed answer key and several "blank sheets" all at the same time. What we have to do is not only compare our "Candidate's Record of Answers" with the proposed answer key, which you can actually do ahead of time since they're posted on this webpage, but if we think that the answer we selected is better than the proposed answer, then we will have the chance to make this argument on the "blank sheets" that they will give us. Just make sure you provide a thorough argument, because if you write down "My answer is better than your answer," it will not be valid. In addition, the atmosphere during the protest session is the opposite compared to taking the exam, in other words, we can briefly talk to each other, we can ask each other for their opinion on a certain question, talk to each other more in-depth while walking out of the building, etc. Hope this helps.
  3. My apologies for going off-topic just for a little bit, however, in my senior year of high school, I did my Senior Thesis on the "Disadvantages of Technology." I would have loved to use the examples above and below to prove my point, especially since this did hit the local media.
  4. The exam had two parts: The first part, which included the memorization portion, was the civil service exam. This part was 60 questions and the score you get from that will determine your list number (higher the score, lower the list number & lower the score, higher the list number). The second part, which was 75 questions was the BOSS exam. This part is a pass/fail score. In other words, if you got one or two or three incorrect answers, in the long run it doesn't matter. However, if you got a lot of incorrect answers, then you're out of luck.
  5. As far as New York City Transit, they have you disclose past drug tests from the previous two years. As far as LIRR and/or MNR is concerned - I honestly don't know about those agencies. Sorry...
  6. For "Employment Operations" - 347-643-8229/30/31/32 For the DCAS hotline to check your status on the list - 212-669-1357, select option #2, enter your 9-digit Social Security number and follow the prompts. Good luck!!
  7. It was for me during the AM session on that day!! Like I said, I took an educated guess with that one particular question...
  8. Unfortunately for this you cannot check to see if your name was restored back to the list or not. As long as you got the piece of paper in the mail from DCAS stating that your name was restored, you're good to go. Just like in my quote in the previous post, you and me just need one thing: patience. I know it's hard, however you're not the only one, especially with that fact that following this incident, to this date, I still have to take a drug test and submit paperwork for the TA 4600 Bus Operator position.
  9. First, can we please stay on-topic? You are aware that Exam 7612 has it's own thread, right? Second, if you personally feel that you're "pissed off" by their "Employment Operations" Department, you're not the only one. If you wish to complain, but don't know how to, send me a Private Message (PM) and we'll take it from there.
  10. Since this is not a civil service exam, as soon as you have your paperwork, I would go back to Livingston Street ASAP and see what they say.
  11. They also give you the memorization booklet as well so you can compare your answers with the "map" that we had to memorize. A score of 83 is not bad, however with the fact that I personally got 6 incorrect questions, I'm going to make an effort to go. I was personally hoping for a higher score...
  12. From taking the test that Sunday morning, there were indeed seven multiple-choice questions. I know #7 was the hardest and least expected question and I took an educated guess for that particular question on the day of the exam.
  13. https://cptdb.ca/wiki/index.php/Port_Authority_of_New_York_and_New_Jersey
  14. Definitely! Although the list will not be published for at least a year, from what you mentioned, you got a 93.33%. That's good, however we have to wait and see how many other people got the same score as you or scored better. Definitely!! You need a 70% or better to pass, therefore if you get a 90, that's considered, in my opinion, a high score. However, we have to officially wait until the list comes out and we'll take it from there.
  15. Next time you report to them, be honest and, chances are, they'll let you fix it, especially if you're in the early stages of the employment process.
  16. On the "old" home page, click on Multiple Impacts for the , & and you'll get this:
  17. As @dman1455 said, the answer key is available on this page. As far as how I did, I got one wrong with the memory portion, however I got 5 other questions incorrect, for a total of six incorrect questions, with a proposed result of 90% (54 divided by 60 equals 0.90, and move the decimal place two places to the right). As of now, I still plan on going to the Protest Review session on July 23rd to see how I can increase my proposed score. As they say, "You never know until you try!"
  18. It was taken care of because it was irrelevant to this thread. As per the guidelines of the website, can we please stay on-topic? Thank you...
  19. First, did you look at the handouts? Second, remember two terms: pivot point and reference point. The pivot point is the object the rear tire "pivots" around when making the turn. The reference point is the thing you "refer" to when making the turn. For the standard 90 degree right turn, your reference point is the vertical bar to either the curb or the left rear bumper of the car which is parked adjacent and initially perpendicular to you. Make sure you also keep your four feet on your right side as well. The easiest way to do this is to put yourself over the white dotted line. As a result of you doing this, not only will you have the space to make a wide turn, but you won't have to worry about this since this is one of the things you always have to do. I would encourage you to look at and print the 5th and 6th pages of the handouts. If the handouts are too small, you can copy and paste the image into Microsoft Word, make the images bigger by pulling the corners and print them out. Good luck!!
  20. You're welcome. Good luck!!
  21. Although I'm not a Train Operator nor an NYC Transit employee, I'll tell you this: Once you're done with Schoolcar, which is considered "training," you will have one year of probation to go through. Now, just like the other titles, if something happens, before they fire you, I'm assuming you'll get a warning, along with an extended probationary period, which, if I had to take an educated guess, could be up to 2 years. Therefore, it's up to you. In addition, have you looked at this thread, this thread and this thread? It's going to take some time with all of those pages, however by reading everything, not only will you understand everything more in-depth, but hopefully you'll make a knowledgeable decision about when to re-book your vacation, compared to saying "goodbye" altogether.

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