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Via Garibaldi 8

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Everything posted by Via Garibaldi 8

  1. Full Shutdown of L Train to Be Halted by Cuomo Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo plans to announce that the L train subway tunnel between Manhattan and Brooklyn will not fully shut down in April as planned.CreditCreditHiroko Masuike/The New York Times By Emma G. Fitzsimmons and Shane Goldmacher Jan. 3, 2019 [What you need to know to start the day: Get New York Today in your inbox.] Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo announced on Thursday that the L train subway tunnel would not fully shut down in April as planned in what would have been one of the biggest transit disruptions in New York City’s recent history. The L train shutdown was scheduled to begin April 27 and last 15 months, crippling a key piece of the city’s transportation network. The Metropolitan Transportation Authority, which operates the subway, had said the closing was necessary to repair damage from Hurricane Sandy in 2012, when the tunnel between Manhattan and Brooklyn was inundated by floodwaters. Under a new plan unveiled by Mr. Cuomo the work would be done on nights and weekends. He said not fulling closing the L train would be a “phenomenal benefit to the people of New York City.’’ It was not yet clear what alternatives the M.T.A. would choose. The authority, for example, could choose to do the work on nights and weekends. For months, subway officials have been preparing for the closing and planning alternate routes for commuters to reach Manhattan, which have included a significant expansion of bus service and adding bike lanes. When the shutdown was announced in 2016, the news prompted panic in Brooklyn over what it meant for real estate and local businesses to be choked off from Manhattan. Last month, Mr. Cuomo, who controls the subway, toured the L train tunnel with engineering experts to see if there was another way to undertake the repair work. “If there’s a better way of doing it, they tell us there’s a better way of doing it,” Mr. Cuomo said at the time. “If there’s not a better way of doing it, they say that’s the best that it can be done.” The transit agency initially said the shutdown would be 18 months and later shortened it to 15 months. Subway officials had considered two proposals — a shorter, full closing of the tunnel or a partial three-year shutdown that would have allowed some trains to continue running. They chose the full closure in an effort to do it quickly and limit the inconvenience for riders. Source: https://www.nytimes.com/2019/01/03/nyregion/l-train-shutdown.html?fbclid=IwAR1RppSzDHjJbP08mtXg5ZTN71eSlCktY5EOO6YpDIMquu19ODz3k_x3kVM
  2. Via Garibaldi 8

    Express Bus Advocacy Group

    I brought this up in my last meeting, and it's a problem again. We'll discuss this again, along with adjusting the run times.
  3. Via Garibaldi 8

    Express Bus Advocacy Group

    After careful consideration, I've decided to form an express bus advocacy group, which I will be leading. While it's in its infancy, our core mission is the following: -To represent all express bus riders across New York City to advocate for better service. This means that when the agency proposes service cuts, instead of allowing them to vote without anyone speaking against them, they'll be a group out there speaking at the board meetings and at other events to remind the agency of why express bus service exists and its importance to the various communities around the City. We feel that the agency has become obsessed with meeting its fiscal obligations while sacrificing on service, and we cannot stand by and allow this to continue as hundreds of passengers face longer commutes, more time away from their families, and higher and higher costs by way of fare increases, and having to take cabs and the like to get to and from work, school and other events on a daily basis. This is a critical time for transportation in NYC, and the fact that the economy is booming along with the population, and ridership continues to decline shows a serious problem with service across all platforms. Since our group is just launching, I will be posting more particulars later. You are free to PM if you are interested in joining. We understand that people have other obligations, and this is why I will be the one doing most of the grunt work (speaking at meetings, contacting elected officials, etc.) since I have experience doing these things from previous projects I've undertaken, but we appreciate anyone joining who wants to assist where they feel that their contributions will work best. That's it for now. I want to also state that the purpose of this thread is to encourage positive discussion on the aforementioned topic, so I will not be responding to any negative comments or anything that is going to throw the thread off into something that it shouldn't be, nor any personal attacks, as I don't have the time for it. Via Garibaldi 8
  4. In late December, the Express Bus Advocacy Group met with Assemblyman Dinowitz to discuss the feasibility of an HOV lane on the Major Deegan Expressway. During our meeting, we also mentioned our ongoing talks with the Comptroller's Office to petition for another audit of express bus service Citywide to force the to get their act together. Since the 2015 audit, very little has changed regarding express bus service, and in fact service had deteriorated significantly since then, and the Staten Island redesign continues to be a failure, with hundreds of commuters complaining on social media and at the bus stops about constant late and missing buses and overcrowding. The same is true of the other boroughs where there has been no redesign. This afternoon we received word from Assemblyman Dinowitz's office of his interest in seeing another audit done as well. The letter is below, along with the correspondence written to the DOT for a possible HOV lane on the Major Deegan Expressway.
  5. Via Garibaldi 8

    Express Bus Advocacy Group

    @Lil 57 Yeah BusTime has bugs. The buses back to Queens often come up as via 6th Av buses. They aren’t. When they reach 57th the sign on BusTime comes up correct, particularly on the QM4. I’ve been waniting for the Electchester Bus and have seen the sign correct on the bus, but incorrect on BusTime.
  6. Via Garibaldi 8

    Express Bus Advocacy Group

    ANNOUNCEMENT: For express bus passengers needing to transfer to a different express bus, we have been hearing from passengers that announcements are now being made on express buses stating that ”customers can transfer to a different express bus in the destination borough”. This announcement is correct FOR NOW, and includes “drop-off only” stops. I spoke with my contacts about this several weeks ago. This was done to alleviate any difficulties that express bus riders have had since the Staten Island express bus redesign. It remains in effect until further notice SYSTEM WIDE. Should you have additional questions, please ask here.
  7. Via Garibaldi 8

    Express Bus Advocacy Group

    We noted the areas where QM buses were skipping segments of the trip on the QM2 and QM5 in our express bus review and this information was given directly to a higher up @ the MTA to address. This problem has since been rectified, and we check to ensure that this remains the case. If for some reason, you or anyone else experiences problems, let me know about it and I will have it addressed ASAP. I have been asked to let people in from the MTA to my group to monitor service. They want to see what the problems are and I do just that. It allows me to have their ears on a daily basis which is great. Most of them don’t comment and I agreed to not tag them either. Here and there we talk via PM about certain issues that pop up.
  8. Via Garibaldi 8

    Express Bus Advocacy Group

    That’s correct. We’ve made such a stink about it my group and another group that they created them. It’s been something we’ve been asking for for a while and something I had planned on mentioning in my meeting coming up this month. One less thing to discuss now...
  9. Via Garibaldi 8

    Express Bus Advocacy Group

    Yes and all morning trips were filled too. This is the first time in several weeks that all 9 AM trips and all 7 PM trips were filled. If they can’t run a rush hour only line with 30 minute headways at night, how in the hell are we to believe that they can provide frequent service with buses coming every 4-5 minutes...
  10. Via Garibaldi 8

    Express Bus Advocacy Group

    The MTA has been slowly chopping away at QM1 service. This is why I’ve been especially vocal about it because I know the exactly what they’re trying to pull. Run piss poor service to deter ridership, and then turn around and say OH, well ridership declined, so we have to cut service, but this time we have proof for MONTHS showing exactly how many trips they haven’t been filling every day. Every single day I have been logging ALL MORNING AND EVENING QM1 trips and in our upcoming meeting I am going to be on their @ss about why so many QM1 trips continue to go missing. This is not acceptable and I am demanding answers. This is a public agency that taxpayers contribute towards, and they have a responsibility to meet the transportation needs of said taxpayers, and they are not doing it, and they must be held accountable for their horrendous service. After noting that I was contacting elected officials, I see tonight that all QM1 trips have been filled. However, I still will be grilling them about the past several weeks. They like to try to skirt around my questions and say oh well give us specific examples, so this time I’m coming with specifics and I want answers to my questions. That’s why I’ve been asking who will be at this meeting so that I don’t have people shrugging their shoulders when I ask why for example their buses were running so hot constantly on various QM lines.
  11. Bus speeds to increase 25 percent by 2020, Mayor de Blasio vows Among the nation's big cities, New York City has the slowest bus service. Faced with the slowest bus service among the nation's big cities in addition to sharply declining ridership in recent years, the administration vowed to expand bus priority on streets; ramp up police enforcement of bus lanes and push Albany for state-controlled measures, such as camera enforcement. Photo Credit: Getty Images/wdstock By Vincent Baronevin.barone@amny.com @vinbarone Updated January 10, 2019 5:00 AM Mayor Bill de Blasio will pledge during his State of the City address Thursday to drastically improve local bus speeds over the next two years to help revive the failing, unreliable service. Faced with the slowest bus service among the nation’s big cities in addition to sharply declining ridership in recent years, the administration will vow to expand bus priority on streets; ramp up police enforcement of bus lanes and push Albany for state-controlled measures, such as camera enforcement. With the combined efforts, the city aims to improve average bus speeds by 25 percent, from 7.44 miles per hour to 9.03 miles per hour by the end of 2020. “Buses are a critical link in our public transportation system, and we’re doubling down on improvements to help get New Yorkers moving,” said de Blasio in a statement. “We look forward to working with the MTA to give our city the bus system it deserves.” The state-run Metropolitan Transportation Authority saw a drop of almost 60 million bus trips from 2010 to 2016 — down from 697 million annual trips to 638 million — as average speeds trended down, with the mayor bearing much of the blame for not doing enough to accommodate buses on city streets. The administration now plans to more aggressively implement current strategies and try some new techniques to accelerate buses to faster speeds than the city has seen in at least 18 years. “It is an ambitious goal,” said Polly Trottenberg, the city’s Department of Transportation commissioner, who noted that many of the efforts draw from recommendations from transit advocates. “We know the city has a big role to play in trying to get buses moving faster and trying to turn around the decline in ridership,” she continued. “And I think what you’re hearing . . . is a really big commitment to do that.” On the streets themselves, the administration will markedly increase the miles of bus lanes it installs each year from seven to between 10 and 15 miles per year. Each year, it will also tweak five miles of existing bus lanes with new design elements in addition to extending hours during which other vehicles are restricted from access. This year the city will launch a small pilot to install up to two miles of physically separated bus lanes to keep cars from unlawfully blocking service. Though Trottenberg wouldn’t elaborate as to what the city will use to separate the lanes or where the lanes would be located. The city currently has 111 miles of dedicated bus lanes, which critics point out are often blocked by idling or parked vehicles. To help keep that network of lanes clear, the mayor will establish for the first time dedicated tow truck teams within the Police Department. There will be seven towing teams patrolling the city, starting immediately, according to the mayor’s office. De Blasio’s DOT will also more quickly roll out a technology that allows for buses to more expeditiously move through signaled intersections, known as traffic-signal priority, or TSP. The technology allows buses to communicate with traffic signals, allowing the signals to hold green lights longer for approaching buses or end red lights sooner to get buses rolling. The city now plans to activate TSP for buses at 1,200 intersections by the end of 2020, up from a commitment of 1,000 intersections before. The mayor will also advocate for the reinstatement of Select Bus Service after the MTA nixed the rollout of new SBS routes as part of a money-saving effort in its next budget. Jon Orcutt, a spokesman for the advocacy group TransitCenter, welcomed the new commitments as “the best possible start to the new year for city bus riders” who “now have the mayor in their corner.” Orcutt said it was critical to have new police enforcement, and appreciated that the mayor is making pledges with tangible goals. “There’s a lot of measurable targets,” he said. “That, I think, speaks to the seriousness of what they’re proposing.” Many of the initiatives the mayor is endorsing had also been called for in the MTA's own proposal to improve bus service, which the authority’s Transit president, Andy Byford, had unveiled in his Bus Plan from April of last year. “I welcome the Mayor's support on initiatives we identified in our Bus Plan and Fast Forward Plan and have been working in close collaboration with our partners NYCDOT to implement,” Byford said in a statement. “We are also counting on the Mayor’s engagement for us to obtain the robust funding and community support we need to fully implement these plans which will bring benefits to millions of New Yorkers.” Source: By Vincent Baronevin.barone@amny.com @vinbarone Vin has been covering transportation at amNewYork since 2016. He first landed on the beat at his hometown newspaper, the Staten Island Advance, in 2014.
  12. Signal delays snarled subway commutes nearly every day in 2018 230 morning rush hour rides were marred by signal issues last year despite the MTA’s Subway Action Plan By Caroline Spivack Jan 14, 2019, 2:56pm EST Signal delays often snarled straphangers morning subway commutes in 2018, according to new analysis by the Riders Alliance. Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images It is more than a year since the MTA’s Subway Action Plan to fix the dilapidated subway system was enacted, but straphangers may not realize anything has changed. According to a new analysis by the Riders Alliance, weekday morning rush hour commutes were marred by signal problems 92 percent of the time in 2018. Of the 251 morning rush hour rides in 2018, 230 were snarled by signal issues. January and February were the worst months with signal delays literally every single morning, according to the group’s analysis of MTA data. “It turns out the subway is just as bad as everyone thought, and the reality is that we can’t fix these problems without a significant investment in new signals and other modernization,” Riders Alliance executive director John Raskin said Monday. “The subway is using technology from the 1930s, and until we replace it with a modern system, it’s going to continue to fail, with riders suffering the consequences.” The F was the worst line, with 72 days of morning rush hour signal delays—which translates to more than a quarter of all morning commutes in 2018. Six subway lines saw more than 50 days with signal delays—a signal failed on one in five work days. Another ten lines suffered more than 30 days with signal woes. In July 2017, then MTA chairman Joe Lhota unveiled the transit agency’s plan to address both immediate and long-term issues with the ailing subway system, which included creating a team dedicated to fixing 1,300 signals in dire need of maintenance by the end of 2018. The short-term fixes cost $836 million to implement, which figured to $450 million in operating costs and $386 in capital investment. Gov. Andrew Cuomo ponied up half of the cost, and after months of staunch opposition, Mayor Bill de Blasio agreed to cough up $418 million toward the plan. NYC Transit president Andy Byford’s “Fast Forward” plan to overhaul the transit system would replace the failing signal system with new technology known as communication-based train control—a linchpin of the plan. But the plan is still in need of funding—as much as $30 billion worth. Riders Alliance called on Cuomo and the state legislature to fund that plan by including congestion pricing, which is expected to generate about $1 billion per year, in the state budget, due on April 1. “The bad news is the subway is deeply in crisis, but the good news is there’s a plan on the table to fix it and now we need the funding from Albany,” Riders Alliance spokesman Danny Pearlstein said at the press conference. “We also want to see [congestion pricing] at a time when the governor is at the height of his negotiating ability in the legislature.” https://ny.curbed.com/2019/1/14/18182360/mta-nyc-subway-signal-problems-riders-alliance?fbclid=IwAR2fQeO6Aj2L1CRtvH3irwLzW-2pRchVQwlb9eSenerragSXXs3fv2GT8SI
  13. State lawmakers pen letter to LIRR president: You're on alert now In a letter sent Thursday to LIRR president Phillip Eng, seven state senators informed the railroad chief of their intention to hold public hearings about on-time performances. Video: https://www.newsday.com/long-island/transportation/senator-kaminsky-letter-eng-lirr-1.26055834?fbclid=IwAR3HeHMA9PW1sLwZHVNNRiXaIYKJzfvobajr1yrWwXEQViR3wmZVYrbOJsI Democratic state senators gathered Thursday at the LIRR Rockville Centre station to discuss plans to hold hearings on the railroad’s “subpar” performances. (Credit: Newsday / Alfonso Castillo) By Alfonso A. Castillo alfonso.castillo@newsday.com @alfonsoreports Updated January 17, 2019 6:25 PM A group of state lawmakers plans to hold hearings regarding the Long Island Rail Road’s on-time performances, which they described as “subpar and in desperate need of thorough review.” In a letter sent Thursday to LIRR president Phillip Eng, seven state senators, including the chairs of the Senate Committee on Corporations, Authorities and Commissions and the Transportation Committee, informed the railroad chief of their intention to hold the hearings and to “invite and encourage” his participation. “Statistics reveal what commuters know quite well — that the LIRR's recent performance is subpar and in desperate need of thorough review and revamping,” the senators wrote in the letter. “In light of the legislature’s role in funding the MTA’s budget, as well as fulfilling our role as representatives of the riders who rely on your service, we intend to exercise our oversight authority in an effort to seek collaborative solutions to remedy an unsustainable situation.” Speaking at the Rockville Centre LIRR station Thursday morning, Sen. Todd Kaminsky (D-Long Beach), who has led LIRR reform efforts in Albany, said the letter to the LIRR aims to make clear the new Democratic majority Senate aims to “hold its feet to the fire” — something, he said, previous legislatures did not do. “That changes now. From day one, you’re on alert now, LIRR,” said Kaminsky, who was joined by newly elected senators Anna Kaplan (D-North Hempstead) and Kevin Thomas (D-Levittown). “We’re going to be asking what your plans are. We’re going to make sure that every dollar you spend is done efficiently and smartly. We’re going to make sure that there’s people that you actually answer to — that it’s not going to be just a nameless, faceless bureaucracy.” The senators' call follows a particularly difficult year for the LIRR, which through November, was on pace to record its worst annual on-time performance in nearly two decades. In the first 11 months of 2018, delays exceeded the previous year by more than 3,000. The number of trains canceled and average length of delays also grew significantly. The new year got off to a rough start, as the LIRR found itself investigating two train derailments in the first week of 2019. The LIRR also has dealt with numerous delays caused by signal problems and broken rails, all while reducing scheduled rush-hour service to Penn Station to accommodate construction work. Source: https://www.newsday.com/long-island/transportation/senator-kaminsky-letter-eng-lirr-1.26055834?fbclid=IwAR2vfNVICy8F1P_UDBZND4jrpP3EPfsMPHMkJIneH_CHDiOtiyZFgWXjKV4
  14. Via Garibaldi 8

    MTA Bus Operations: On-board screens and announcements

    I was on an M4 this morning with automated stops (no screens though). They had the old announcements for the X17C and X17J.
  15. Via Garibaldi 8

    Express Bus Advocacy Group

    Yeah that's what I said...
  16. Via Garibaldi 8

    Express Bus Advocacy Group

    Not surprised. There hasn't been a QM1 bus since 5pm.... Just think about that. Almost TWO hours during rush hour with no QM1 service. I'm going to see if they send out the 7pm bus now because the 4:30pm came. That's nice of them to send out the last bus....
  17. Gov. Cuomo set to propose new congestion pricing plan to fix subways Video: https://abc7ny.com/video/embed/?pid=5077720 Dave Evans reports on the governor's congestion pricing plan. Monday, January 14, 2019 07:01PM NEW YORK (WABC) -- New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo is set to propose a new congestion pricing plan to ease traffic in Midtown Manhattan and help fund the MTA. If the governor gets his way, anyone going south of 60th Street will pay a new toll. Last year's proposal was $11.52 per trip for cars, and $25.34 for trucks. Sources say this year's plan will probably be very similar. All the new money, about $600 million a year, would go to fix the city's subways. But the governor is also proposing to tear up the MTA and run things himself. He calls the troubled agency a mess. "When everyone is in charge no one is in charge," said Cuomo. "I am willing to assume responsibility but I'm not doing it without authority." "I do commend the Governor for stepping up and saying he wants responsibility for the MTA," said New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio. "I think there's something good there." The mayor praised the governor Monday, saying that if he can fix the subway, go to it. But as for the governor's plan to force the city to pay for half the repairs, de Blasio said there is not enough money. "If anyone thinks that money can be found in the city budget they may be smoking marijuana," said the mayor. "So the fact is it just isn't there" A new poll out Monday shows most New Yorkers support congestion pricing 52 to 39 percent. Cuomo says if it doesn't go through this year it'll likely never happen. The official debate on this kicks off Tuesday in Albany with the governor's budget address. Source: https://abc7ny.com/5077274/?ex_cid=TA_WABC_FB&utm_campaign=trueAnthem%3A+Trending+Content&utm_content=5c3d45bc9ac56400016678cb&utm_medium=trueAnthem&utm_source=facebook&fbclid=IwAR1B5mjCvGF5O7W3nBN-ajxyh3NohiD5t8Wb1CV_crRwTqL_fE7ca8BA5Bg
  18. Via Garibaldi 8

    Express Bus Advocacy Group

    So to recap the QM1 tonight, per BusTime: No 4pm, no 5:30pm and no 6pm. Already three out of 7 trips not filled. David Weprin is supposed to be joining the group now. Just talked with one of his staffers and showed him the letter that my Assemblyman wrote to the Comptroller's Office about how horrendous service has been. As the letter says below, even using the 's own metric, since August 2017, they haven't been able to get on-time performance above 70%, and dropped below 50% for the last three months available in 2018. I can believe it because looking at the trips that I've taken and logged, often times on-time performance was well below 50%.
  19. Via Garibaldi 8

    Express Bus Advocacy Group

    I didn't expect a 7pm last night either but yelled and screamed on social media about what a mess the QM1 has been now and then it was sent out. Worse of all they aren't even turning the QM5 trips into via Fresh Meadows trips to accommodate the QM1 riders that need Fresh Meadows. There is no way in hell anyone can defend the amount of trips that go missing on that line every single day. If you can't make service during rush hour on 30 minute headways, you clearly have a chronic problem. It's not the bus operators either. This is a managerial problem. They just cannot consistently fill trips for days in a row. Now I sit and make bets on which trips won't be filled every night because it's become so predictable now.
  20. Via Garibaldi 8

    Express Bus Advocacy Group

    Tonight's service is the pits and I don't understand it at all. @QM1to6Ave I spoke with David Weprin's office a few minutes ago via social media about the QM1 and I'm trying to get him to join the group so that he can see the MESS that you've been dealing with for months. It's really ridiculous. Tonight I didn't see a 4pm bus. The next two buses came. They haven't had one night now in WEEKS where they've been able to fill all seven PM trips.
  21. Via Garibaldi 8

    Express Bus Advocacy Group

    Wouldn't shock me. There's a bunch of missing buses tonight already. I don't know what in the hell is going on, but this agency has a chronic problem making service. That much is true. Even at 5 in the morning, we have tracked certain lines and there are several buses missing, OR we have passengers tell us, yeah my daughter takes the 5:15 BxM9 in the morning, and the bus didn't show up so it was standing room only. Ridiculous...
  22. Via Garibaldi 8

    Commuters to LIRR: Trains are dirty

    Commuters to LIRR: Trains are dirty Riders paint a picture of spilled beer and coffee on train floors, and food grime on seats and windows. The Long Island Rail Road counters that it has hired more workers and cleans trains more than in the past. Trash is strewn about the floor and seats of an eastbound LIRR train on the Babylon Branch after the evening rush Wednesday. Photo Credit: Newsday/Thomas A. Ferrara By Alfonso A. Castillo alfonso.castillo@newsday.com @alfonsoreports Updated January 13, 2019 6:00 AM The Long Island Rail Road, just months after promising to ramp up efforts to keep trains clean, is fielding complaints from riders and its own workers about trains being filthy. The accounts of spilled beer and coffee on train floors, food grime on seats and windows, and bathrooms overflowing with sewage come as the LIRR — under pressure by the Metropolitan Transportation Authority to cut costs — scales back a plan to increase train cleaning efforts. The LIRR said its "car appearance maintainers" clean each of the railroad's 115 train sets about 4.5 times a day. It also comes as the railroad continues to carry a record number of riders, including some who, according to fellow commuters, think little of leaving their trash behind when they step off a train. The LIRR carries close to 300,000 riders on an average weekday. Trash is visible on a rush-hour LIRR train on the Babylon branch on Thursday, Jan. 10, 2019. Photo Credit: Debbie Egan-Chin "Ridership at historically high levels places great demands on our system," LIRR spokesman Aaron Donovan said. "We are meeting those demands with a diverse set of responses, and we continue to look at new ways to improve further.” Although the railroad said it has increased its number of car cleaners and the number of times trains are cleaned each day by about 5 percent, many commuters said they haven't noticed a change for the better. “Guys leave their beers around. And people push their garbage in between the seat and the wall, just below the window . . . I’ve seen people blow their noses and push it in there. And I’m just like, ‘Holy cow. How could you do that?’ ” said Steve Oleksiw, 59, of Garden City, who has been commuting on the LIRR for 30 years and is dubious of LIRR president Phillip Eng’s claim that the railroad has stepped up train cleaning efforts. “They don’t seem any cleaner ... . Those that are commuting to work every day, I think, are getting fed up.” Tony Arroyo, 49, of Long Beach, similarly called his LIRR commute “absolutely disgusting,” and said he’s sometimes reluctant to put his luggage on the floor of a train out of fear of what might get on its wheels. Source: https://www.newsday.com/long-island/transportation/clean-forward-eng-lirr-cars-1.25829252
  23. Via Garibaldi 8

    Express Bus Advocacy Group

    Was it sent via Fresh Meadows?
  24. Via Garibaldi 8

    MTA Bus Operations: On-board screens and announcements

    lol I was just messing with ya. I know you don't know.
  25. Via Garibaldi 8

    SUBWAY - Random Thoughts Topic

    Rather than trying to figure out, they just give you the benefit of the doubt. Same deal with the express bus. You can transfer from any express bus. I often times will take advantage and take the BxM1 in and the BxM2 out on one fare if I do a pay-per-ride.

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