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Aqueduct

The High Line

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In regards to the tressle on the west side that they just turned into a park, would it have been possible to use that as part of the (7) line extension or extend the (L) which is only two or three blocks away? The High Line goes up to Penn Station so it would have been ideal to use the old freight line in this manner.

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In regards to the tressle on the west side that they just turned into a park, would it have been possible to use that as part of the (7) line extension or extend the (L) which is only two or three blocks away? The High Line goes up to Penn Station so it would have been ideal to use the old freight line in this manner.

 

The High Line is not connected to Penn Station. Once it turns at the LIRR yard and descends, it actually connects to the Freedom Tunnel. The future 7 line to Javits however runs perpendicular to the line right before the tunnel, therefore a ramp would have to be built for that connection. If the L train were to go up to the High Line, it would be more of a hassle since the ramp would be at least 3 blocks long. Remember, the IND eliminated all except one EL line in Manhattan. Most likely, they wouldn't even think about connecting the subway lines to the High Line.

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The High Line is not connected to Penn Station. Once it turns at the LIRR yard and descends, it actually connects to the Freedom Tunnel. The future 7 line to Javits however runs perpendicular to the line right before the tunnel, therefore a ramp would have to be built for that connection. If the L train were to go up to the High Line, it would be more of a hassle since the ramp would be at least 3 blocks long. Remember, the IND eliminated all except one EL line in Manhattan. Most likely, they wouldn't even think about connecting the subway lines to the High Line.

 

I had to mention the (L), it is nearby and if I didn't someone else would have pointed out the close proximity of the two points. I will say that park they have up there now is a nice little stroll, walked through it a few days ago.

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It is correct that the former NYC elevated freight line runs underground on the north side of the west side yard, however that tunnel is filled in, and the west side line "freedom tunnel" now connects via a totally different route, called the Empire Tunnel. This tunnel connects the west side line to NYP. Empire corridor service, as well as the adirondack daily train to montreal uses this connection.

 

The elevated trestle is actually very overbuilt even for its original purpose. If you ever walk under it, you will notice that it has about 4 or 5 more beams than it needs to compared to other bridges from the era. With proper care, this structure will last a few hundred years before needing any major replacements of load bearing elements.

 

I can't wait to take a walk to the 14th st apple store from midtown. :cool::P:eek: :tup:

 

This is the lone, single, one and only "rails to trails" project that i actually approve of.

 

- A

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To use the High Line for subway service would require a complete renovation of the structure, in which it would have to be torn down and rebuilt. And if the (L) were to leave Eighth Avenue and ascend up to the high line, it would be a steep ascension because the (L) runs right under the (A), (C) and (E).

 

The (7) I could see on the High Line. But as stated as above, it would probably cost more to tare down and rebuild the line than to build a tunnel. What I could see is the (L) seeing the Jacob Javits station as a northern terminal though....

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I've seen the High Line up close many times. Trust me, it could definitely have been used as the extension for the (7) line. It SHOULD have been used for the extension. Unfortunately, when it comes to urban trains, the New York City government still posesses the same mentality that it pretty much had when it destroyed all the Els some 60-70 years ago... They would rather finance a complicated, expensive, and cumbersome subway tunnel project that stretches only 8 blocks south and 4 blocks west than fix up an already-built elevated structure, which could have a ramp built to it from the (7), and station structures easily built onto/into it (DEFINITELY more than two stations). In fact, the city didn't even want to help finance the construction of a second station (41st Street-10th Avenue) on that extension. What's the point of waiting seven or eight years for a single station that is only slightly southward of the current end-of-the-line, and submerged underground?:confused::tdown:

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I've seen the High Line up close many times. Trust me, it could definitely have been used as the extension for the (7) line. It SHOULD have been used for the extension. Unfortunately, when it comes to urban trains, the New York City government still posesses the same mentality that it pretty much had when it destroyed all the Els some 60-70 years ago... They would rather finance a complicated, expensive, and cumbersome subway tunnel project that stretches only 8 blocks south and 4 blocks west than fix up an already-built elevated structure, which could have a ramp built to it from the (7), and station structures easily built onto/into it (DEFINITELY more than two stations). In fact, the city didn't even want to help finance the construction of a second station (41st Street-10th Avenue) on that extension. What's the point of waiting seven or eight years for a single station that is only slightly southward of the current end-of-the-line, and submerged underground?:confused::tdown:

 

There is no way to connect this trestle to the subway in a practical & fiscally sane way. Where it goes underground, it is filled in, unstable, unused, and the alignment directly conflicts west side development projects, as well as the fact that there is the empire tunnel in the way.

 

The line COULD have been connected to the 7 before the Javits center was constructed. Do you understand also, that the 7 line is very deep, and to cross the (1)(2)(3) and (A)(C)(E) to the ramp segment now mostly filled in uptown of the west side yard would make no sense, and put riders on the 7th ave and 8th ave lines at risk during construction.

 

I personally think the (7)<7> was fine terminating at times square. This new extension is just one more way delays can hit the line, especially seeing that it doesn't directly connect to any other line that it can use as a backup.

 

I am all form ore subway service, but 1-2 blocks away from the 8th ave line and only for how many blocks? I think the (MTA) could have used this money elsewhere, like on deteriorating station platforms.

 

- A

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There is no way to connect this trestle to the subway in a practical & fiscally sane way. Where it goes underground, it is filled in, unstable, unused, and the alignment directly conflicts west side development projects, as well as the fact that there is the empire tunnel in the way.

 

The line COULD have been connected to the 7 before the Javits center was constructed. Do you understand also, that the 7 line is very deep, and to cross the (1)(2)(3) and (A)(C)(E) to the ramp segment now mostly filled in uptown of the west side yard would make no sense, and put riders on the 7th ave and 8th ave lines at risk during construction.

 

I personally think the (7)<7> was fine terminating at times square. This new extension is just one more way delays can hit the line, especially seeing that it doesn't directly connect to any other line that it can use as a backup.

 

I am all form ore subway service, but 1-2 blocks away from the 8th ave line and only for how many blocks? I think the (MTA) could have used this money elsewhere, like on deteriorating station platforms.

 

- A

 

Well who on Earth says that it HAS to go through the West Side yards? With the modern construction technology of today, there could be many possible, safe, not-too-expensive, and viable solutions. And if necessary, a couple of buildings could always be razed... After all, that's what there doing all along 2nd avenue on the Upper East Side, in preparation for the construction of the SAS and its stations...(T)

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Well who on Earth says that it HAS to go through the West Side yards? With the modern construction technology of today, there could be many possible, safe, not-too-expensive, and viable solutions. And if necessary, a couple of buildings could always be razed... After all, that's what there doing all along 2nd avenue on the Upper East Side, in preparation for the construction of the SAS and its stations...(T)

 

There is only one way to connect the highline to the (7), and that is to come down across 7th and 8th ave's and go up to 20 feet below ground & then create a ramp area above the empire tunnel with only a few feet to spare. There is a building boom in nyc, there are no buildings on the west side that are dilapidated enough to just make go away, plus as i can figure no buildings aside from the javits center loading dock area actually are in the way. Not sure what you mean about not going through west side yard, the trestle surrounds the west side yard to the north west and south, if you wanna use it for the (7) you would have to use that portion, which again conflict with development plans (not that i favor building over the yard).

 

- A

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It would be way too difficult to connect the highline to the (7) now. There are way too many buildings going up along 9th and 10th aves. Also don't forget that below the javits center and across the street from it there was room and a skeleton for a future train station was built. There were stairs and escalators built across the street from the Javits Center just in case the station was ever built. Now as far as the (L) going north it would only be feasible if there was a stop on 23rd st. & 10 ave. and then head towards the Javits center. The reason is that there is no bedrock and firm ground to be drilled into along 11th ave south of 26th street. Also since 11th avenue terminates at 21 street and the West Side Highway cuts diagonally southward the extension north would be under private property which won't work. If the (7) were to be extended further south (I HIGHLY DOUBT EXTENSION) it would probably go to 23/25 sts. The Highline does look nice though. Check the album I put up on the freight railroads forum. I put it there since it was a freight road owned by the New York Central. Enjoy.

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A light rail line would have been nice. (Evoked by the little sections of track running through the park, some parts embedded in the concrete). They could have even tied it with the 42nd St line, if that hadn't fallen through. Or, it could have used the existing ramp, to a small platform connecting to the Farley station.

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