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Miaaa

When Was The 6 Train built?

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Hey guys! Just a quick question! When was the (6) train built? I ride it everyday and would like to know. I notice it has nice tilework in stations. Its definitely different than the ones I see at Columbus circle (on the (:P train platform). I also like those new trains with those computer announcements! They are really cool! Thanks. If this is a stupid question I'm sorry! =\

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Its not stupid question at all, its ok to if you don't know much of the system. I dunno a LOT like 100% lol, but now some and more, and continuing as well :P . Anyways I think u mean the the car(Known as Rolling Stock), not the route. R142A Built from 1999 to 2004 by Kawasaki. It is used on the (4)(6) . R142 is used on the (2)(4)(5)

 

Check out this page for the diffrent car models:

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_York_City_Subway_rolling_stock

 

As well http://www.nycsubway.org (For shots/Model/History/more)

 

The ones with Computer announcements are found on the R142, R142A (For the Numbers, A Division(IRT)) | And for R143, R160A, R160B(For the lettered lines, B Division (IND/BMT)).

 

R160 is the latest of Rolling Stock Fleet!

 

These are known as "New Technology Train" (NTT).

 

As well as the first prototyped cars from 1992 and later, which are not in service. (R110A for IRT), (R110B for IND/BMT)

 

(B) run on R68A/R68

 

There are more cars btw, even cars that were build during the 1800s when there was no (MTA) bit the divisions were divided and owned separately~~

 

Hope that can give you some info!

 

B)

 

btw welcome to the forums and enjoy your stay!

Edited by mark1447

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The (6) runs along two "lines". A line is just a set of tracks. In Manhattan, it runs on the Lexington Avenue Line (you can guess why :P). This line opened in 1904 from City Hall to 42nd Street. The remainder of the line in Manhattan opened in 1918. In the Bronx, the (6) runs along the Pelham Line (as noted by the signs on the train). The Pelham Line was built in 1919.

 

Tilework on the numbered (or A division) lines is typically more ornate than those on the lettered (or B division) lines.

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For starters, the (6) just south of Grand Central to City Hall (loop station) is a series of Contract I IRT stations. The current fleet that the (6) uses are R142A's which was built by Kawasaki.

 

im guessing Contact I is also the West Side line + brances and contact II was to Extend West Side/Lex line north and south?

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im guessing Contact I is also the West Side line + brances and contact II was to Extend West Side/Lex line north and south?

I'm not entirely sure but I think Conract I was the original subway in 1904. This would be from the (6) from City Hall to 42nd St., the shuttle, and then the (1) to 96th St. (or was it 125th?). Contract II was probably extending Lex Ave. northward and 7th Ave. southward.

Hey guys! Just a quick question! When was the (6) train built? I ride it everyday and would like to know. I notice it has nice tilework in stations. Its definitely different than the ones I see at Columbus circle (on the (:P train platform). I also like those new trains with those computer announcements! They are really cool! Thanks. If this is a stupid question I'm sorry! =\

You bring up a very interesting point about the tilework. The IRT (numbered lines, private company who built the original subway) was known for its very intricate tilework. The tilework you see in stations today has mostly been added in order to beautify the subway, during each station's renovation. The BMT (other privately owned company; (J) through (Z) lines) has similar tilework, and in some cases, even more intricate mosaic work (like the stations along the (L)). The IND was a city-owned company independent of the private lines, and bought out the other two companies in 1940. They built the (A) through (G) lines, and include the (V). Their tilework is almost always (if not always) a colored band around a station with a black border around it (evident in stations along 6th and 8th Ave., and Queens Blvd.).

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I'm not entirely sure but I think Conract I was the original subway in 1904. This would be from the (6) from City Hall to 42nd St., the shuttle, and then the (1) to 96th St. (or was it 125th?). Contract II was probably extending Lex Ave. northward and 7th Ave. southward.

 

 

 

 

umm there was no shuttle during the opening of the first IRT, The first IRT ran from 145th Street manhattan(On the IRT Broadway Line) to City Hall loop(On IRT Lex Line)

 

via 42nd Street

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The Manhattan sections of the (6) are much, much older than the Bronx sections. The Pelham Line, from 3rd Avenue to Pelham Bay Park, was constructed during the period of 1918-1920.

 

But regarding this, I have a question: Is the diamond a symbol of the IRT? Nearly every station has a diamond motif in the mosaics.

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Contract I: West side line (including the Lenox branch) from 145th to 50th street, the 42nd street shuttle, the East side line from 33rd St. to City Hall, the WPR line up to West Farms Sq.

Contract II: All stations below Brooklyn Bridge - City Hall on the east side line, and up to Atlantic Avenue in Brooklyn.

Dual Contracts: The rest of the IRT and most of the BMT lines

Tilework on the numbered (or A division) lines is typically more ornate than those on the lettered (or B division) lines.

 

Well that would only apply to Contract I&II stations. The Dual Contract IRT stations have the same level of beauty as most of the underground BMT lines. Of course, the IND is bland as hell :cool:

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The Manhattan sections of the (6) are much, much older than the Bronx sections. The Pelham Line, from 3rd Avenue to Pelham Bay Park, was constructed during the period of 1918-1920.

 

But regarding this, I have a question: Is the diamond a symbol of the IRT? Nearly every station has a diamond motif in the mosaics.

 

Diamonds are not really prominent as they used to be. Diamonds use to represent bi-directional rush hour service. Then they downgraded it to represent rush hour peak-direction service only, and then in 2004, most diamonds were eliminated. The only reason that the <6> and <7> are still used is because they operate in tandem with (6) and (7) service, whereas when the <D> ran to the Bronx during p.m. rush hours, the (D) didn't. Hope that helps!

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I always thought that Contract I was:

(1) from 242 Street to north of 42 Street, and the old South Ferry loop

(2) from Tremont Avenue to north of 42 Street

(3) from 145 Street to north of 42 Street

(4) from south of 42 Street to Atlantic Avenue

(5) from Tremont Avenue to 149 Street-Grand Concourse and from south of 42 Street to Atlantic

(6) from south of 42 Street to City Hall loop

and the 42 Street shuttle

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The line as a distinct route technically began on 8-1-18 when the first station of the new Pelham branch of the Lexington line, 138th St. 3rd. Av. opens. A few weeks before that, the Lexington stations down to Grand Central opened, but that was probably the (4) (Woodlawn) serving those.

Before then, the older more ornate "Contract 1" stations below GC, were served technically by the (1), which crossed over to the west side on 42nd.

As for the rest of the (6), the development proceeded as follows:

 

1-8-19 extended to Hunts Point Rd.

5-30-20 extended to 177th St.

10-24-20 extended to Westchester Sq.

12-20-20 completed to Pelham Bay Park.

 

From

http://www.erictb.info/linehistory.html which treats all the lines as the beginnings of the current routes.

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