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MTA has 8,200 staff members making more than $100G


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MTA has 8,200 staff members making more than $100G

BY Pete Donohue

DAILY NEWS STAFF WRITER

 

Tuesday, June 30th 2009, 4:00 AM

 

 

More than 8,200 MTA staffers earned more than $100,000 last year, including dozens who doubled their pay with overtime, according to an analysis of payroll records.

 

The biggest moneymaker at the Metropolitan Transportation Authority was then-CEO Elliot Sander.

 

He stepped down earlier this year after Gov. Paterson said he wanted new leadership at the helm of the bus, subway and commuter train network.

 

Sander was paid $290,000 last year, and his contract calls for the MTA to keep paying him for another full year despite his departure.

 

It's not just the executives in suits, however, in the six-figure club, according to the breakdown by the Empire Center for New York State Policy, an offshoot of the conservative Manhattan Institute think tank.

 

A few hundred in the six-figure club were police officers, commuter train conductors, foremen and train engineers whose average overtime ranged between $79,000 and $103,000, the report said.

 

"You can't argue MTA workers are poorly paid," said E.J. McMahon, Empire Center director.

 

At the MTA and other public agencies, top-level executives generally would make more money if toiling in the private sector for large corporations of similar size, McMahon said. The MTA has about 68,000 workers.

 

NYC Transit, the bus and subway division, comprises the bulk of the workforce but fewer than a dozen of the 100 highest-paid workers are in it, the report found.

 

More than 40 work at the Long Island Rail Road.

 

Nearly 25 of the highest-paid MTA staffers were on the headquarter's payroll; more than half of those were police officers, detectives, lieutenants and sergeants in the MTA Police Department.

 

pdonohue@nydailynews.com

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NYC Transit, the bus and subway division, comprises the bulk of the workforce but fewer than a dozen of the 100 highest-paid workers are in it, the report found.

 

 

This sentence sums up the whole article. Plus this article has nothing to with the subways so it's in the wrong forum!

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Well it goes to show, even though we in the MTA DOS and DOB move far more people than MNRR and LIRR combined, we still make the least monies in the people moving part of MTA........

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If you want to really see what people at (MTA) or any state agency or school district are making, check out http://www.seethroughny.net/

 

I read about the LIRR mechanics. Apparently, years ago, the had a work rule written that required a position to be covered 24/7, even if there was no work to do.. Making $10-12 hourly, it wasn't that bad. At $30 plus an hour plus diffs, it adds up fast..

 

The Presidents of LIRR, MNRR, NYCTA, B&T, are the top 4 earners & number 5 is a LIRR Mechanic.

Why be the boss if you can earn like one without the headaches??!?!

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