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lilbluefoxie

Those things on the front of the subway cars

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What do those things, they look like handles or gates on the front attached to some expanding thing do? Does it involve anything with connecting the trains together or is it just a safety device?

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What do those things, they look like handles or gates on the front attached to some expanding thing do? Does it involve anything with connecting the trains together or is it just a safety device?

 

Those are anticlimbers (I believe); they're also called pantograph gates. It basically prevents passengers from falling in between the cars from the outside. They can be folded but I think they spring back to full position. I also think that they push against each other when the train makes turns. Hope that helps.

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Yes, just for safety reasons, so people wouldn't fall into the gap between the cars, and they are releasable. It doesn't really prevent train surfers from doing what they do.

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What do those things, they look like handles or gates on the front attached to some expanding thing do? Does it involve anything with connecting the trains together or is it just a safety device?

 

The "handles" are used to attach the springs (which are on the car side opposite) between cars on R44, R46, R68/A, and new tech equipment.

 

The gates extend out to do the same thing.

 

Both are a safety device which doesn't have anything to do with coupling the trains. It prevents people on the platform from falling between cars. Both the "chains and hooks" and gates do the same thing.

 

To the poster above who said they were anticlimbers, anti climbers are something else. Anticlimbers are the heavy duty steel pieces that just out at the ends of the car. Were you to walk between cars (note: don't), it would be the first thing you stepped on when you got to the next car. It's called an anticlimber because it's job is to prevent the car from "climbing" onto anything it hits, including other cars, in the event of a collision of some kind. Also useful to walk on though, especially for crews boarding trains in the yard

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No need for them since they have the metal ropes that are connected between each car.

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Note that the trains with pantograph gates are either singles (excluding R68/As) or pairs and are installed on the operable end(s). All the 60 ft SMEEs had them b/c there are people that crosses on their operable or front ends, which are round or have the least support. On the other hand, the non-operable ends don't have gates b/c they are for the most flat or vertically parallel and only need chains. The R44s-R46s don't have gates on their operable ends b/c you can't walk through a full cab. Note that R62/As are the last one to have them b/c they were and are still some single units with both full and half width cabs. These gates mainly useful for the half width cabbed cars b/c people cross them. R68/As on the other hand regardless of full cab or half cabs, won't allow anyone to cross b/c 75 ft trains create a tremendous gap when turning and renders the gates and chains useless. This applies with the non-operable R44/R46 ends as well and also why you don't see gates on R68/As as they are obsolete.

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The "handles" are used to attach the springs (which are on the car side opposite) between cars on R44, R46, R68/A, and new tech equipment.

 

The gates extend out to do the same thing.

 

Both are a safety device which doesn't have anything to do with coupling the trains. It prevents people on the platform from falling between cars. Both the "chains and hooks" and gates do the same thing.

 

To the poster above who said they were anticlimbers, anti climbers are something else. Anticlimbers are the heavy duty steel pieces that just out at the ends of the car. Were you to walk between cars (note: don't), it would be the first thing you stepped on when you got to the next car. It's called an anticlimber because it's job is to prevent the car from "climbing" onto anything it hits, including other cars, in the event of a collision of some kind. Also useful to walk on though, especially for crews boarding trains in the yard

 

Oh so that's what anticlimbers are. Okay then. So what we were really talking about all this time were pantograph gates. Thanks.

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What do those things, they look like handles or gates on the front attached to some expanding thing do? Does it involve anything with connecting the trains together or is it just a safety device?

 

Those are pantograph gates, usually seen on the R62 on the (3) line, and the R62A on the (1) and (7) lines.......

 

The reason they are there isn't for passing between car reasons. That is why there are safety chains hooked up from door to door. Pantograph gates are to keep blind persons from walking from the platform between the cars while the cars are in the station. I asked a TSS about that before..........

 

This is the same reason why there are barrier springs on the other cars.........

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Those are pantograph gates, usually seen on the R62 on the (3) line, and the R62A on the (1) and (7) lines.......

 

The reason they are there isn't for passing between car reasons. That is why there are safety chains hooked up from door to door. Pantograph gates are to keep blind persons from walking from the platform between the cars while the cars are in the station. I asked a TSS about that before..........

 

This is the same reason why there are barrier springs on the other cars.........

Then, do you mean that the R40 slants could've gotten away with just chains and no pantograph gates after all? That would've been excellent actually.

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Then, do you mean that the R40 slants could've gotten away with just chains and no pantograph gates after all? That would've been excellent actually.

 

 

Yes. Those pantograph gates (and barrier springs) wouldn't keep anyone going from car to car on the train, from going under the wheels or train if they fell. That is why the safety chains are there, from door to door on both sides, and we must ensure they are up when preparing a train for service.........

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