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What modifications would be needed?


Pu3rToRoCk8947

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Okay unless this has been answered before please excuse this overall dumb question from me.I am curious if the MTA one day decided to operate joint MN/NYC Subway train service between East 180th Street Station,Eastchester-Dyre Avenue Station with extensions into Westchester County,what modifications are needed on that line?.

correct me if i'm wrong wasn't that segment an actual railroad before and were the dimensions of the rolling stock similar to MN/LIRR standards?

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Most commuter railroad and long distance railcars are 85 feet long, so anything related to these larger cars would have to follow up and have the proper loading gauge to handle them. The only "realroad" worthy cars in my personal opinion would be the old triplexes, and the newer 75 foot cars. Plus you also would need to modify the platforms to allow possible center doors on the 85 foot cars, since most rolling stock today has either quarter point, end, or end and middle doors.

 

- A

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Dont forget under-running vs. over-running 3rd rail. Metro-North and SEPTA MFL are the only systems in North America that use under-running third rail.

 

Also there's the issue of IRT cars being too narrow for platforming without bridgeplates.

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Dont forget under-running vs. over-running 3rd rail. Metro-North and SEPTA MFL are the only systems in North America that use under-running third rail.

 

Also there's the issue of IRT cars being too narrow for platforming without bridgeplates.

 

Yea, easily solved by putting one set on the outside of the tracks, and one on the inside, though i wouldn't recommend even retractable shoes in this situation, because you don't want 3rd rail, especially bottom contact near the platform, since there's no practical way to cover it.

 

- A

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