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Harry

More Fliers Skipping the Cab

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Getting to the airport on the outskirts of town used to be a simple proposition — catch a taxi, even if it meant sitting in traffic.

 

But in recent years, the number of options has grown, especially at some of the biggest airports, with direct trains and shared-ride services. The additional options are cheaper and also more reliable, in many cases, if there is a lot of traffic on the highways.

 

Shared-ride transfers offered by companies like SuperShuttle in the United States and Go Airport Shuttle, which operates in North America and Britain, can be more time-consuming than a taxi or limousine ride, but are significantly less expensive. And fast trains — like the Heathrow and Gatwick Express trains in London and AirTrain JFK and AirTrain Newark in the New York area — are less expensive than a taxi and often faster.

 

The express trains and shared-ride transfers are becoming more attractive to business travelers, said Dave Kilduff, managing director of ground transportation consulting for the CWT Solutions Group, because in “this type of economic environment, corporations are turning over every rock to save money. They’re looking at alternative forms of transportation.”

 

And services like the Heathrow Express “are not only faster, they’re keeping people off the road, they’re environmentally friendly,” he added.

 

Read more: http://www.nytimes.com/2009/08/11/business/11transfer.html?_r=1

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Getting to the airport on the outskirts of town used to be a simple proposition — catch a taxi, even if it meant sitting in traffic.

 

But in recent years, the number of options has grown, especially at some of the biggest airports, with direct trains and shared-ride services. The additional options are cheaper and also more reliable, in many cases, if there is a lot of traffic on the highways.

 

Shared-ride transfers offered by companies like SuperShuttle in the United States and Go Airport Shuttle, which operates in North America and Britain, can be more time-consuming than a taxi or limousine ride, but are significantly less expensive. And fast trains — like the Heathrow and Gatwick Express trains in London and AirTrain JFK and AirTrain Newark in the New York area — are less expensive than a taxi and often faster.

 

The express trains and shared-ride transfers are becoming more attractive to business travelers, said Dave Kilduff, managing director of ground transportation consulting for the CWT Solutions Group, because in “this type of economic environment, corporations are turning over every rock to save money. They’re looking at alternative forms of transportation.”

 

And services like the Heathrow Express “are not only faster, they’re keeping people off the road, they’re environmentally friendly,” he added.

 

Read more: http://www.nytimes.com/2009/08/11/business/11transfer.html?_r=1

 

With the sky high fares of cabs everywhere, I am not surprised people are using either mass transit or charter buses/minin-vans to get to the world's busiest airports.

 

Another major international airport that this article should have focused on imo, is Chicago and O' hare. The CTA's Blue line stops near at the international arrivals terminal and a shuttle bus takes you to rest of Ohare. Plus its' only 45 minutes to the 'loop' aka Downtown Chicago.

 

Back to closer to home, i still think it's a rip-off for the Port Authority and the (MTA) to charge the full $5.00 fee from transfer between the (A) train and the Airtrain at Howard Beach station. It only about 1.5 miles from the subway station to the main terminals. Also its unfair to nearby residents mainly airport workers that live near the (A) line.

 

On other hand since it a 5-mile ride on the Van Wyck, the $5.00 air train is fair and valid going between Jamaica and the JFK terminals.

 

Just my takes.:eek:

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Also don't forget that some agencies charge more for an Airport ride just to make more money.

 

Examples:

 

NJT fares to the Airport should be price to N. Elizabeth(from North) or Newark(from South)+$5.50 for AirTrain. However, fares from NY and Secaucus don't follow that rule. It costs $15 from NY.

 

SEPTA Airport stations are in Zone 2 geographically, but Zone 5 Peak fares apply at all times.

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Also don't forget that some agencies charge more for an Airport ride just to make more money.

 

Examples:

 

NJT fares to the Airport should be price to N. Elizabeth(from North) or Newark(from South)+$5.50 for AirTrain. However, fares from NY and Secaucus don't follow that rule. It costs $15 from NY.

 

SEPTA Airport stations are in Zone 2 geographically, but Zone 5 Peak fares apply at all times.

 

This is basically an example of 'legalized' price fixing imo you mentioned my friend.:mad:

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Monthly pass between newark penn and newark airport rail station is 60 bucks, PATH ride is 1.75 per swipe. If you fly to/from newark often and live in nyc not a bad deal.

 

I personally have been encouraging people to take the bus or train from the airport, if they have big bags i encourage them to take (NJT) from ewr, or LIRR from JFK. Bus from LGA. I have also ridden the bus with tourists from EWR to NWK and PATH to (2) SHowed them where their hotel was (the pennsylvania). They had bags too.

 

- A

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Monthly pass between newark penn and newark airport rail station is 60 bucks, PATH ride is 1.75 per swipe. If you fly to/from newark often and live in nyc not a bad deal.

 

I personally have been encouraging people to take the bus or train from the airport, if they have big bags i encourage them to take (NJT) from ewr, or LIRR from JFK. Bus from LGA. I have also ridden the bus with tourists from EWR to NWK and PATH to (2) SHowed them where their hotel was (the pennsylvania). They had bags too.

 

- A

 

Good advice. However for occaional airrport travelers like myself(too bad here in Hudson Valley the only aiprot "Stewart-Newburgh' only flies to places like Albany, DC-Dulles or Fla. and have heavy bags you just have to pay those high fares.:mad::o

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I can highly attest to this. Traveling nearly 25 weekends a year. Most places I avoid taking a cab, and have not touched one in Boston, New York City, Washington DC, or Chicago. I choose mass transit first and foremost, even over a rental.

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I can highly attest to this. Traveling nearly 25 weekends a year. Most places I avoid taking a cab, and have not touched one in Boston, New York City, Washington DC, or Chicago. I choose mass transit first and foremost, even over a rental.

 

Me too. However i am lucky i got relatives all over the US.

 

off topic for moment. welcome back Texas.:cool:

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I fly often out of Boston and into DCA. Boston is either a transfer from the Green/Orange Line to the Blue Line and then a short shuttle ride to your terminal or a ride on the Red Line to the Silver Line bus which goes directly to the terminals.

 

The Blue line is best a busy times or if there are issues in the tunnel to the airport. It is a rare occasion, but there was one time when the Ted Williams tunnel closed and many people missed their flights.

 

In DC, the Blue and Yellow Lines are connected to the terminals. You can't get much closer than that. Easy ride on either line right into downtown.

 

In maybe 10 years Dulles will be an option in DC with the Silver line going all the way downtown.

 

Chicago is also quite easy and not that bad of a trip.

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I think AirTRAIN needs to be run from LGA to the nearest sensible subway/LIRR (or both) connection. Even if it means crossing Willets point to get to jamaica, i mean heck you could even have a citi field station..........

 

- A

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I think AirTRAIN needs to be run from LGA to the nearest sensible subway/LIRR (or both) connection. Even if it means crossing Willets point to get to jamaica, i mean heck you could even have a citi field station..........

 

- A

 

 

 

Related to this topic a question for Metsfan or anyone that knows. I never been on the SEPTA Philly airport aka R-1 line how is it? ie service, the fare and how fast to Central(Downtown Philadelphia)?

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Related to this topic a question for Metsfan or anyone that knows. I never been on the SEPTA Philly airport aka R-1 line how is it? ie service, the fare and how fast to Central(Downtown Philadelphia)?

 

The R1 is a dedicated branch line that splits off from the amtrak NEC (:septa: R2) line near University City station.

 

The fare to center city is cheap ($6 if have ticket all ready, $7 if bought on train), service is good & you got those old silverliners with proper luggage racks at each end & the travel time is great, about 20 minutes (try doing that in a car!) & runs hourly.

 

Timetable PDF: http://www.septa.org/service/sched/pdfs/R1Airport.pdf

 

- A

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