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lilbluefoxie

What is wrong with this picture?

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they must of climbed some staircase to get on. Or maybe thats a yard..

 

I wonder why the LIRR had blue strips then its yellow. I thoght Blue strips were for MNCRR

 

Tho i love the style of the M1, looks like an R44/46

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According to the website, that photo is dated 1969. The West Hempstead branch was electrified in '73 according to arrts-archives. That particular pair may have been sent up the branch to evaluate any possible clearance issues. In that case, it would obviously have to be towed/pushed by a diesel locomotive.

 

The Metropolitans were the first cars the LIRR had ordered that required high-level platforms. The only exception to this was the GE-modified gas turbine M1s which were outfitted with trap doors so they could be used on the (at the time) low platforms on the diesel branches.

 

Blue striping was the norm on M1s when first delivered, and was not specific to MNRR. There are a few M3s roaming around the LIRR that still have the blue stripes on them. Aesthetically the M1/M3s and R44/46s are similar due to design by the same firm. In addition, the newly-created MTA was set on creating a "unified" appearance.

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they must of climbed some staircase to get on. Or maybe thats a yard..

 

I wonder why the LIRR had blue strips then its yellow. I thoght Blue strips were for MNCRR

 

Tho i love the style of the M1, looks like an R44/46

 

(S)ame here ,Blue(S) stripe nice:cool:

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Storage.

 

- A

 

I very much doubt an EMU would be stored in diesel territory. On the Oyster Bay branch, electrification was extended from Mineola to East Williston for the prime purpose of keeping the main clear. To this day, one EMU (train #1501) runs from East Williston in the AM for third rail polishing.

 

It would be much wiser to store the train on the two tail tracks in the confines of Hall, or Johnson Ave. Yard...the list goes on. Not West Hempstead in 1969 though.

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I very much doubt an EMU would be stored in diesel territory. On the Oyster Bay branch, electrification was extended from Mineola to East Williston for the prime purpose of keeping the main clear. To this day, one EMU (train #1501) runs from East Williston in the AM for third rail polishing.

 

It would be much wiser to store the train on the two tail tracks in the confines of Hall, or Johnson Ave. Yard...the list goes on. Not West Hempstead in 1969 though.

 

i dont see any 3rd rail how ever. So how did it get there? dieseled locomotive?

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There would be no pantographs on the cars. LIRR uses over-running third rail.

 

I say they're ping pongs.

 

lirr1758.jpg

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There would be no pantographs on the cars. LIRR uses over-running third rail.

 

 

I know, but the ping pongs seem too smooth versus the trains in the other picture. Andy is probably right about them being PRR coaches.

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Nothing is wrong with that picture actually. I'm sure the logical observation is that you see an M-1 in West Hempstead with seemingly no 3rd rail power. However, this picture explains that issue.

 

2qmlwyg.jpg

 

It's unthinkable that the third rail would be put up right next to a low level platform, but that's how they did it back in the days.

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Only problem with the last picture, is that they are not the same coaches (PRR low roof) and there is no 3rd rail in the photo from the first post. Those cars were stored there after some kind of work usage or testing.

 

That is a service platform. Remember, PRR and old (steam era) LIRR equipment stayed in service and on (NYCT) property till the early 70's. DL&W MU's were not even pulled from service till well after this photo was taken!

 

- A

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Only problem with the last picture, is that they are not the same coaches

- A

 

They are the same cars at the same platform just taken at different angles. They are different caoches because the front of the train has different coaches than the rear. The old green train was pulling out thats why it seems like it is a different train.

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how did they expect people to board the train there? to climb up? its not like the old ones that had stairs.

 

Why couldn't I think of that in the first place? AFAIK, they carried that design with the C3 coaches/cabs as well b/c LIRR is for the most part powered by third rail.

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When I started working on the railroad in 1972, the West Hempstead branch was the only electrified branch not running M-1s. There where 2 reasons. The stations east of Valley Stream were low platforms, and the sub stations were not powerful enough to support the M-1s. For those reasons conventional older Mu cars were operated on that branch until I believe 1974 when the needed upgrades were made. This photo shows what was probably an early test run.

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Just to put some things to rest, the coaches to the left are MP-54 MU cars. They are not PRR cars, because the PRR cars required AC catenary, and there is no catenary at West Hempstead. Both the PRR and LIRR used similar monitor-roofed MP-54 carbody designs, one type adapted for third-rail DC operation, the other type for 11,000 volt AC overhead operation, but only the LIRR had round-roofed (with rooftop ventilators) MP-54s.

 

The third rail is under the platform lip at this point. This was done sometimes when yard tracks or walkways were adjacent to the tracks on the other side, for employee safety. It is assumed that passengers would not go out of their way to stick their feet underneath the platform lip, and they certainly should not be on the tracks.

 

The West Hempstead branch was actually part of the New York Bay Extension, constructed in 1893 between Valley Stream and Country Life Press. It was cut back to West Hempstead in the 1930s because the State of New York insisted that the railroad eliminate, at its own expense, all grade crossings between West Hempstead and Country Life Press. The entire line, Valley to Country Life Press, was third-rail electrified in 1926, not 1973. As a youngster in the '50s and early '60s, I remember seeing the abandoned portion east of West Hempstead, with the track and third rail still in place. I never had the nerve to touch the third rail to see if it was still alive.

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