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What is this ramp..


mark1447

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These are for passing over the first track when it is being worked on. It allows passengers to board on the next track. I saw these a lot when I commuted on Metro North from New Haven. The trains just stop so the doors are aligned with the platforms so passengers can board.

 

Here is a good pic from Wikipedia or the Noroton Heights station:

NorotonHgtsRRstaRailsideView07192007.JPG

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These are for passing over the first track when it is being worked on. It allows passengers to board on the next track. I saw these a lot when I commuted on Metro North from New Haven. The trains just stop so the doors are aligned with the platforms so passengers can board.

 

Correct.

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These are for passing over the first track when it is being worked on. It allows passengers to board on the next track. I saw these a lot when I commuted on Metro North from New Haven. The trains just stop so the doors are aligned with the platforms so passengers can board.

 

oh ok. But what is suppose to hole them up? The outer poles in the pic?

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I'm surprised this isn't being used for Brighton, maybe because of the different lengths of the cars.

 

Thats not a gd idea. Especially since its a city subway and lots of people use it.. Plus 1 or 2 cars of the R68s cant hold a load of passangers, since the storm doors are locked...

 

It is a good idea for commuter railroad since its not as heavily used in certain stations.. Depends..

 

thx guys btw!

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The proper name for those metal ramps is a "Bridge Plate." They have been doing catenary and tie replacement all up and down the New Haven line during the past several years, and those are absolutely necessary during the rush when switching tracks to the opposite platform is not a viable option.

I had the fortunate opportunity to see those set up recently at my home station. There are ties laid parallel to the tracks with holes drilled. Metal poles are inserted into the holes in the ties, and provided that an engineer hits the car marker accurately, the plates provide ample space on both sides of the doors. Of course, during inclimate weather or with longer consists on short platforms, a conductor is often asked to spot.

I hope that helps.

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yeah and a bad spot you can still overshoot.. happened a lot when taking the train early in the morning.

 

My morning train always platforms at Stratford in the dark, no matter what time of the year it is and yes, it is a bit difficult to hit the plates accurately. The conductors generally buzz for a stop; I've never heard them get on the P.A. The engineer we've had for over a year now on the 1503 (4:12 am) out of New Haven is pretty good, so there hasn't been much of an issue with missing markers.

The evening home can be a little different, however, especially if the train is running behind schedule and the engineer comes in fast and hard and doesn't pull a decent brake. Quite a few reverser keys have been flipped on the way back to New Haven... :eek:

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have you ever had one of the "skinny" platforms that are much narrower then the standard size? haha those are fun :P

 

I've seen those at some of the local stations (Rowayton, East Norwalk, Greens Farms, Southport and Stratford). I'm guessing ridership plays a role, since Bridgeport, Fairfield, Westport, etc. always have bridge plates large enough to park a Hummer on.

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