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R32 3348

What is the logic behind battery runs?

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Today I left school at 5:30 and entered the 96th St. station on the 6 at 5:35. After some trouble with my metrocard I get on the platform to find it crowded. I immediately know there's a delay, or else the platform wouldn't be that crowded.

 

I wait for 6-7 minutes for a train to come, and this train skips the station, on a battery run. It is getting increasingly crowded. The next train comes 5 minutes later (meaning I waited a total of 12 minutes for a 6 train during rush hour - this is the most crowded line in the system so you should be able to guess the consequences) so I get on. By the time we left 86th St. the train was already packed in every car, with no more room for people to get on. To make matters worse there were French tourists taking up an entire row of seats and half the standing space with their luggage (and then there was a fat person opposite them). We pass 77th and 68th Sts., and all you could see when the train left the stations, was just a giant wall of people, about double or more than the usual crowd of people.

 

At 59th, the C/R says that the next stop will be 42nd St., skipping 51st St. I was at the last car, where the 51st St. transfer to the E was, so 5/6 of the entire car empties out onto the platform. I eventually decide to wait for the next 6 train (right behind) and see if I can fit, can't, and then take an R train home.

 

My question is this: why do trains make battery runs whenever there are delays? I know the conventional answer is to keep trains on schedule, but it makes crowding in stations and on every train afterward exceedingly crowded. And if there's a delay, the train is going to be late to the terminal anyway.

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Kris, whenever there is a holdup, the train tries to get itself back to where it belongs on the line. I remember being on a (J) train and we went express from Myrtle to Broadway Junction because another (J) train was behind us. It's crazy how the trains have to skip stations though to get back on point though. If anything, can't an (A) train send in relief? Then it would cause more upheaval, so it's really a PITA to deal with. Sorry you had to endure that though. :P

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When trains bunch up, it catches service up to prevent crowding further on down the line and distribute passenger load to trains behind the train being given the skip. The problem when trains are late is that they bear the most passengers getting on and off, which slows operation down and makes the train later.

 

By giving the train a skip, you pass those problems on to the trains behind and give people further down the line more timely service. It can be a nuisance but sometimes battery runs work in riders' favor (like when I was late, got a skip from 86->125 and made my Metro North train earlier this week).

 

One more thing about battery runs...they happen ALL the time on the (6)

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When trains bunch up, it catches service up to prevent crowding further on down the line and distribute passenger load to trains behind the train being given the skip. The problem when trains are late is that they bear the most passengers getting on and off, which slows operation down and makes the train later.

 

By giving the train a skip, you pass those problems on to the trains behind and give people further down the line more timely service. It can be a nuisance but sometimes battery runs work in riders' favor (like when I was late, got a skip from 86->125 and made my Metro North train earlier this week).

 

One more thing about battery runs...they happen ALL the time on the (6)

 

I agree. We batteried from Union Square to Bleecker Street, and then to Canal, and then to Brooklyn Bridge.

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theres nothing i love more than getting a skip during rush hour. it gives me a few minute breather. i also like to honk the horn at passenagers that are pissed off on the platform. when people ask why i did not stop i tell them it's their fault for holding my doors and making the train late. man i hated that one pick i did pm's on the(6)

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On more than one occasion the (L) does it going from Myrlte-Wyckoff to Bway Jct non-stop

 

Or even from Bedford or Lorimer to Myrtle!

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They're not just trying to keep the train as close to schedule as possible; they're trying to avoid an ABD at the terminal, regardless of how much the arrival catches up to its schedule or not. That's an abandoned trip. The departures are more important than arrivals. If the train arrives late, they try to send it back out late if it's a couple of minutes, and then maybe have an "extra" that's a five or so minutes behind, but if it's late enough, they have to abandon it, which looks bad in this modern system where it's all about making it look good (on paper, at least), and affects the crews as well.

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theres nothing i love more than getting a skip during rush hour. it gives me a few minute breather. i also like to honk the horn at passenagers that are pissed off on the platform. when people ask why i did not stop i tell them it's their fault for holding my doors and making the train late. man i hated that one pick i did pm's on the(6)

 

lmao @ honking horn at pissed off passengers

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Maybe a dumb question: Why are such moves called "battery runs" and next to the (6)<6>, which lines have frequent "battery runs"?

 

Probably the (L) and the (4)

 

I'm not sure of the history of the phrase "battery run" but it is different from "express on the local" which happens when an express train is routed on the local track for some reason...express on the local runs express unless told otherwise. "Battery run" or "getting a skip" is a train skipping stops it would have otherwise made. "Express on the local" is an express train making its normal stops, just on the local track.

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Buses do the same thing, except they drop off customers but don't pick any up. I was on a B46 bus and we "batteried" from DeKalb Avenue to Church Avenue. The B/O opened the back door, and often stopped across the street where the shelter or wait area wasn't. The sign also was changed to "NEXT BUS PLEASE".

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From a perspective, I think battery runs on trains running late are convienent for passengers too (as long as their station is not bypassed) It may be inconvienent for passengers trying to leave at the skipped stations and those waiting to board, at least however, there's usually another train coming shortly, right behind the "battery-running" train.

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I got on battery lines on several routes.

1. During G.O. when (D) was running on (N) toward Coney Island, it skipped several (N) stations.

2. When I was living in Yorkville, I often got on (6) uptown made express on local track from Grand Central, 59th, 86th Sts, while other time, it stop at 96th St also.

Right after I move to Queens.

3. Manhattan-bound (7) stopping at 74th, 61st, 46th, 33rd Sts.

4. During IRT Race, when I transfer to New Lots Av-bound (3), it run non-stop from Sutter Av to Junius St, Van Siclen, New Lots Avs.

5. During IRT Race, Wakefield-bound (2) made express run from Gun Hill Rd to 241st St.

6. During IRT Race, South Ferry-bound train run express from Dyckman to 168th Sts, then 137th St, then local.

7. During the weekday, Manhattan-bound (7) local become emergency <7> express which confuse passenger who was on Manhattan-bound local platform.

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They're not just trying to keep the train as close to schedule as possible; they're trying to avoid an ABD at the terminal, regardless of how much the arrival catches up to its schedule or not. That's an abandoned trip. The departures are more important than arrivals. If the train arrives late, they try to send it back out late if it's a couple of minutes, and then maybe have an "extra" that's a five or so minutes behind, but if it's late enough, they have to abandon it, which looks bad in this modern system where it's all about making it look good (on paper, at least), and affects the crews as well.

 

You got a drop? In the last five years I have not seen or heard of anyone getting a drop. The only time I got a drop was when I was running late to begin with than my trn went into emer. and was late by 32 minutes and the boss said how would like to lay-up the next arrival. That was the one and only time I was abd. I ususally make the 11:12 out of Stillwell and I have got out at least an hour later.

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It seems rare these days. They usually just keep everyone behind, and I'm not sure exactly how they get evryone back in place. It seems is it's in the late afternoon, they keep all the AM's out pf place and then try to put the starting PM's in place.

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when i worked PM's i got at least 3 drops a week. it does not take much for the road to blow up on the (6). add in ats and its worse.

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I understand battery runs but I guess my main question is actually: Why did the (6) skip 51st Street? In general, why would trains skip the busier stops and inconvenience more people? I've been on battery runs before (like the one that I mentioned in the OP, but there was a (6) right behind it), and for example, on the (7), if a train is doing a battery run it stops at 74th St., regardless of being an express/local stop. I would imagine that (1) trains do the same at Columbus Circle.

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I understand battery runs but I guess my main question is actually: Why did the (6) skip 51st Street? In general, why would trains skip the busier stops and inconvenience more people? I've been on battery runs before (like the one that I mentioned in the OP, but there was a (6) right behind it), and for example, on the (7), if a train is doing a battery run it stops at 74th St., regardless of being an express/local stop. I would imagine that (1) trains do the same at Columbus Circle.

 

Usually they won't do that but in a case like that, all the 51st passengers get off the first (6) and onto the next one which allows the first (6) to make up much more time since it won't have to let people off and on at that station. It also keeps the next train far enough behind it that there's less risk of it catching up and needing to give the first one a skip again.

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I understand battery runs but I guess my main question is actually: Why did the (6) skip 51st Street? In general, why would trains skip the busier stops and inconvenience more people? I've been on battery runs before (like the one that I mentioned in the OP, but there was a (6) right behind it), and for example, on the (7), if a train is doing a battery run it stops at 74th St., regardless of being an express/local stop. I would imagine that (1) trains do the same at Columbus Circle.

 

it depends who is instructing the crew to make the skips. if its rcc you could get info that does not make sense or seems stupid. if its a tower dispatcher

then most likely its to put you back in place or try and unplug the road.

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Probably the (L) and the (4)

 

I'm not sure of the history of the phrase "battery run" but it is different from "express on the local" which happens when an express train is routed on the local track for some reason...express on the local runs express unless told otherwise. "Battery run" or "getting a skip" is a train skipping stops it would have otherwise made. "Express on the local" is an express train making its normal stops, just on the local track.

Thank you.

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The times I've had to deal with express on the local it was the (7)/<7>. On several ocassions the T/O and C/R got into arguments at Queensboro Plaza about which lineup they were supposed to take and the train would end up on the local running express.

 

I had a battery on the (9) back in the day that went: 96-168-Dyckman-231-242. To this day I don't get why they will have (1) trains skip 238 just to sit S. of 242 waiting for a train to leave.

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Probably the (L) and the (4)

 

I'm not sure of the history of the phrase "battery run" but it is different from "express on the local" which happens when an express train is routed on the local track for some reason...express on the local runs express unless told otherwise. "Battery run" or "getting a skip" is a train skipping stops it would have otherwise made. "Express on the local" is an express train making its normal stops, just on the local track.

 

I think it is an old term taken from the CTA, again I don't know why it's called a "battery run".

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