Jump to content
Attention: In order to reply to messages, create topics, have access to other features of the community you must sign up for an account.
Sign in to follow this  
Harry

Next Train in How Long? More Riders to Know Soon

Recommended Posts

Start the clocks: Digital displays that tell straphangers how many minutes until the next train arrives could be coming to the busiest subway lines in New York next year.

 

More than 150 stations on the numbered subway lines, including the heavily trafficked Nos. (1), (4) and (6), will be providing the information by December 2010; in some stations the clocks will be running even earlier, according to a recently released Metropolitan Transportation Authority document.

 

In the timeless realm of the underground, where anguish can mount with each passing trainless second, this amounts to something of a revolution.

 

“This is what riders want,” said Gene Russianoff, a staff lawyer for the Straphangers Campaign, a transit rider advocacy group. “It helps move the city’s transit system into the 21st century.”

 

Read more: http://www.nytimes.com/2009/10/02/nyregion/02countdown.html?_r=1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Its about damn time already! I see those monitors along the (6) everyday and I always wonder when are they going to be in use. I hope that they decide to start using them early in 2010 as opposed to the end of 10. We'll see.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know some will say it's a waste to make these and other upgrades, but conditions are really are sub-par now compared to any other metro rapid transit system. Even PATH isn't as bad, and they have some serious problems in some stations.

 

- A

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Its about damn time already! I see those monitors along the (6) everyday and I always wonder when are they going to be in use. I hope that they decide to start using them early in 2010 as opposed to the end of 10. We'll see.

 

Just in case some people here haven't seen them, they installed the boards at some stations about a year ago, before covering them up for future use.

 

Here's a phone photo of when it was installed at 96th St. S/B(November 2008):

 

Image015.jpg

 

And a camera photo of when it was covered up, 96th St. N/B (few days later):

 

DSCF2760.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

These really need to be put into use on the IRT East Side. This way, passengers can know what delays are ahead of them so they can avert them and find another way to get to their destination easier.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The IRT, especially Lex has some of the shortest headways in the system. The (6) is almost never more than a few minutes away, so it seems that they've chosen the least useful place to test this system. They've also installed them at certain stations throughout the B-Division (aside from the (L)).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The (6) is almost never more than a few minutes away.

 

Im not so sure about that, one time I waited 10 minutes for a downtown (6) from Canal St, as at least 2-3 (4) and (5) trains thundered through on the express track

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The IRT, especially Lex has some of the shortest headways in the system. The (6) is almost never more than a few minutes away, so it seems that they've chosen the least useful place to test this system. They've also installed them at certain stations throughout the B-Division (aside from the (L)).

The boards were only chosen on the (1)(2)(3)(4)(5)(6) (the (7) will get them later) because they already have the Automatic Train Supervision system. The B Division lines do not have this system yet, so they will not receive these boards until later on.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The boards were only chosen on the (1)(2)(3)(4)(5)(6) (the (7) will get them later) because they already have the Automatic Train Supervision system. The B Division lines do not have this system yet, so they will not receive these boards until later on.

 

Yes, but the IRT has some of the shortest headways in the system. Spending the money to put this system on the B Division when it eventually get ATS would have been a better idea.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The IRT, especially Lex has some of the shortest headways in the system. The (6) is almost never more than a few minutes away, so it seems that they've chosen the least useful place to test this system. They've also installed them at certain stations throughout the B-Division (aside from the (L)).

 

Yeah, with 27 TPH during rush hours, there seems little need for these, but outside Manhattan, where the Lexington and West Side lines divide and merge, with the (2)(5) and (3)(4) interlining, they might prove valuable in deciding which line to take.

 

To be honest, though, much more than countdown boards (which are useful enough; one time I saw the next Brooklyn bound (L) will take another 12 minutes to get to Union Square, so I took a Lexington train and connected to the (A) at Fulton St to get to Broadway Junction), I would prefer that printed timetables for the line(s) served at that station be put up alongside the maps outside fare control. This would allow, for example, to see when the next (A) train to Far Rockaway of Lefferts Blvd is arriving, and decide if to enter the fare control area yet or if there is time to get something else done. The NYT article quotes the chairman of the New York City Transit Riders Council as asking for a repeater outside the station, but easy availability of timetables (just a single line of times of arrivals and departures from that station), along with a highly visible clock, will do just as well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Im not so sure about that, one time I waited 10 minutes for a downtown (6) from Canal St, as at least 2-3 (4) and (5) trains thundered through on the express track

 

I've waited even longer at the Astor Place station for one. The (6) outside rush hours has one of the most erratic service patterns. It gets worse when you are waiting at a station and trains doing a battery run skip the station to get back on schedule.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.