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Eastman346

Subway cars and voltage

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Does each subway car in a train draw 600 volts or does entire train draws the required 600 volts.

 

Each car draws 600v. High voltage is not trainlined.

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Basically, because the shoes are much smaller than the rail, the current can divide itself up, only catch is you gotta put more effort in at the power plant. 600 volts is very small, only a few times higher than standard outlet voltage (110/220), but the watts are much higher. For example a 8 car R68 train requires 3680 watts just to move, not even for air or lighting or HVAC. I am not sure how to calculate DC amps, but i'm sure it would be pretty high. 0.01 amps is fatal to humans, AC amps comes out to about 7.x.

 

- A

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Amps X volts = Watts

 

NYCT third rail is 600v at 10,000 amps.

 

10,000 amps X 600v = 6,000,000 watts

 

Find what you want and fix the above statement.

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Each car draws 600v. High voltage is not trainlined.

 

When a train is going over a switch and a car gaps out, that gapped-out car would have it's motors unpowered, correct? Would the lights/side-signs (if any) run off of the battery on the car or through a lower voltage thats trainlined?

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When a train is going over a switch and a car gaps out, that gapped-out car would have it's motors unpowered, correct? Would the lights/side-signs (if any) run off of the battery on the car or through a lower voltage thats trainlined?

 

I think this is the case. I've felt the hum/whine from the motors stop on gaps. Very stressful on the motors actually, they are very over-built to not just fall apart.

 

- A

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Amps X volts = Watts

 

NYCT third rail is 600v at 10,000 amps.

 

10,000 amps X 600v = 6,000,000 watts

 

Find what you want and fix the above statement.

 

Ok, thank you, i know AC calculations, i know DC is different and the numbers can be much higher on the amps side.

 

Since 8 car is 32 motors, 2 per truck, 4 per car... wow that's a lotta juice, and just for motive power... :eek:

 

No wonder (MTA) has such a monumentally large electric bill. :cool:

 

- A

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No wonder (MTA) has such a monumentally large electric bill. :cool:

 

- A

 

192,000,000 watts * 20 (C) Trains = 3,840,000,000 watts for the (C) in ONE SECOND :eek:

 

10 min bill

 

f.jpg

 

:)

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I doubt the MTA pays what use normal people pay. They probably have a deal with a lower pay per watt usage.

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I doubt the MTA pays what use normal people pay. They probably have a deal with a lower pay per watt usage.

 

They pay about 1/23rd normal rate i believe.

 

- A

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Maybe a dumb question, but what is the difference between I.R.T. Hi-V's and Low-V's - is it found in the controller?

 

There were a few differences between those cars but I'm assuming what you're getting at is why is the Hi-V "High Voltage" and the Lo-V "Low Voltage"

 

A master controller like on the Lo-V (this is also true of any of the SMEEs, or even the Arnines) is considered "Low Voltage" because running through the controller is battery voltage (between 32 and 39 volts, I'd need to see the specs to remember what the voltage is). Under the car you still have 600 but it never goes through the master controller itself. Now when I say running through the controller, I do NOT mean the controller handle - the controller handle is always insulated for safety. However, were you to open up the "box" that houses the fingers of the controller, and look inside, that is where you'd be seeing the electricity in discussion.

 

Since on the Lo-V's and up, you have battery voltage...On the Hi-V, you would have 600 volts inside the controller (again, not the handle, running through under the cover where the fingers are). It's an older and somewhat more unstable system. Obviously if something were to ground out it's safer to have it be a low voltage current than a high voltage one, so this was one of the improvements of the Lo-V cars.

 

In other words (since this is confusing in paragraphs):

 

Hi-V

High voltage powering the car which is regulated by a controller that has high voltage running through it

 

Lo-V

High voltage powering the car which is regulated by a controller that has low voltage running through it

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