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Y2Julio

Conductor 8094 Hiring Process

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Got even better news. Just ordered my 18 inch Husky tool bag from homedepot.com. It cost me a little over 31 in change after shipping & taxes.

 

 

"I would like to thank the good Lord for making me a Yankee."

 

- Joe DiMaggio

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Got even better news. Just ordered my 18 inch Husky tool bag from homedepot.com. It cost me a little over 31 in change after shipping & taxes.

 

 

"I would like to thank the good Lord for making me a Yankee."

 

- Joe DiMaggio

cool

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cool

Yeah, bro. Get on that ASAP. I got a good deal on it. Just have to get my black socks. Not wearing white ones.

 

 

"I would like to thank the good Lord for making me a Yankee."

 

- Joe DiMaggio

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I got the sky blue short sleeves

Are you just wearing white socks or black?

 

 

"I would like to thank the good Lord for making me a Yankee."

 

- Joe DiMaggio

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good stuff Ammo, you will see what I am talking about regarding the uniform process being horrible lol

 

you guys seem like a good group, i wish you guys best of luck

 

my brother has been a conductor for 5 years now and took the T/O promotional so i ask questions all the time..he works the #7 train in the IRT A division..he said the job has its days..remember you own the train not the T/O..if the T/O accidently put the train in emergency you have to pull the cord on him...you can get in trouble for a T/O mistake which sucks..other then this and cutting a stuck door the job  can be easy..but you will learn all of  this in school car ofcourse..

Wrong information once again. They will learn their job when in school car. If the TO accidentally puts the train into emergency, they do not have to pull any cord.... The train already in emergency (It's not the procedure in the rule book if you want to get technical). Pulling cords is based on rules and experience. If you pull cords, and not exactly sure why you pulled it you will be in trouble. Know your job, not what someone told you...

 

Again, they will learn their job while in school car, and get better doing their jobs, after school car. New conductors get into a lot of trouble, for not knowing their jobs or the rules. I been there, seen that, even had to school a couple, and they been out longer than me.

 

Know the rules, not what someone told you. When we were having study groups in school car, if one of us knew an answer to a question, we did not just go by their word of mouth, the person who knew the answer always had to go to the source and show proof. It helped us remember immensely.

 

School car is tough, but it's also the best time of your life in transit.

 

the best bag you can purchase for this position is the red/black huskey 18 inch bag that sells at homedepot..there very picky with the bag you carry because there has been incidents where your crossing the tracks in the yard where people bags are getting cought on moving trains,rails etc..they want you to carry the bag when crossing tracks..70% of transit workers have the 18 inch huskey bag..strong and durable and MTA approve..there like $20 bucks in stock

 

as for the uniforms don't go crazy because you will get them in the mail after measurements , but they will take forever to come or wrong sizes ..you can go online www.automotiveworkwear.com and buy the redcap shirts and pants ..there cheap ! and will last VERY long

Wrong again... 70% do not have the husky bag. You need the right bag, especially because you will be in school car, and representing your instructors, so you better come correct.

 

I have an mta approved backpack. I haven't used my husky bag since I left school car. If anyone lives in the Bronx $20 and its theirs. Looks brand new..

 

 

Last but not least, it's a good job, conductor and TO... The more you know about your job the easier it will be. Forget all the rah rah people say... You need the cash, your not lazy, you want good benefits, this it the place to be. The are plenty of other jobs out there. This is not the last employer in the world. I never met a conductor or TO who hates the job. It may seem tough at first, because you are new, but its gets easier.

Edited by ErikNYC
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my brother has been a conductor for 5 years now and took the T/O promotional so i ask questions all the time..he works the #7 train in the IRT A division..he said the job has its days..remember you own the train not the T/O..if the T/O accidently put the train in emergency you have to pull the cord on him...you can get in trouble for a T/O mistake which sucks..other then this and cutting a stuck door the job  can be easy..but you will learn all of  this in school car ofcourse..

 

Umm if you yank the cord on a T/O who went BIE I guaranteed that C/R is going downtown and will be explaining himself or herself.  

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my brother has been a conductor for 5 years now and took the T/O promotional so i ask questions all the time..he works the #7 train in the IRT A division..he said the job has its days..remember you own the train not the T/O..if the T/O accidently put the train in emergency you have to pull the cord on him...you can get in trouble for a T/O mistake which sucks..other then this and cutting a stuck door the job  can be easy..but you will learn all of  this in school car ofcourse..

 

I have to put this out there, and clarify a few things on this. This is not directed at tprashad, but rather this is based on my own personal experience and the careers of a LOT of people I know, and everything in this post is intended to serve as a cautionary tale for all of you newer folks, to HELP you in your careers down here. I'm not trying to make anyone feel bad, I'm just telling it like it is. That said:

 

There is a reason the test they give you is basic reading comprehension.

 

They want to see how well you can process written words and interpret and apply them according to their EXACT MEANING. They don't want you to infer, they don't want you to assume, guess, paraphrase, or apply your own logic to a situation.

 

Concerning the above: If the T/O goes into emergency, NOWHERE in TA does it say a conductor must pull the cord. In fact, if you actually do this, Train Operators are taught to report the BIE and attempt to recharge the train. If you, the conductor, have pulled the cord, the train will fail to charge. This can cause the Train Operator to be tricked into believing he has a brake pipe rupture, or some other mechanical defect with the train (especially if he knows why the train went in emergency and you don't volunteer that you have pulled the cord). Therefore, your action will completely unnecessarily delay service beyond the minimal amount of time that it would take for a T/O to notify control of the BIE and the reason (if known). If the cause of the BIE is unknown, then the T/O will have to walk around the train and investigate. If the train fails to recharge, the T/O will have to troubleshoot while doing this. Extra steps = extra delay. If the cause is known, now the T/O will have to walk around and troubleshoot where he wouldn't have otherwise = big extra delay. TA doesn't like delays.

 

Again, I am not singling tprashad out...but why does he think this? Because someone told him something (which could have been incorrect from jump), or he probably misheard, paraphrased, or interpreted it. All you new hires - get familiar with the bulletin concerning conductors and safe train operation (I will not post material for employees only here, but once you're hired...that bulletin is your bread and butter). That goes for any rule book discrepancy. You hear something in the crew room, it sounds like a good idea, or that guy swore that's what the rule said...go home, open the book, get on TENS and read the bulletin, and see what is actually on paper.

 

What the most recent edition of the "Conductors - Safe Train Operation" bulletin actually says is if the train experiences an undesired brakes in emergency, recharges, and moves with no explanation from the Train Operator, then the conductor must pull the cord immediately. Therefore, what can be correctly deduced from the bulletin is that if the train experiences an undesired brakes in emergency, and the T/O or you has notified control center (as per rule) and the T/O has complied with Control's instructions and is trying to see if the train will recharge..then it is a complete waste of everyone's time for the conductor to pull a cord not in compliance with every rule and bulletin TA has. And if you do this, you WILL rightfully get blamed for making a delay in service worse. And you will be asked to submit a written report, and it better not have some BS that you "heard" in a crew room, or your assumption based on a partially correct or misquoted bulletin. That's how you get days in the street down here. The crew is a "team" you are not out to snitch on each other, you are each out to help each other and get through the day. But if one of you screws up, that person own it. Cover ups are a big deal, so stay away from all that noise. Know your job, and do your job. You're a conductor, not a policeman trying to hit a Train Operator quota every month.

 

If you take the time to read and learn the bulletins, and keep learning every day...it is not that difficult of a job. If you believe everything you hear in a crew room, kinda sorta understand part of the bulletins, and generally wing it based on your mood that day...then you will develop a reputation and at TA reputation is everything. No one will want to work with you, when you get the seniority to pick, people will avoid you. People will treat you like the plague when they have to work with you (some might even book off sick! the thought of working with you made them puke their guts out!). If others have an axe to grind because of something you pulled working with them, they will be sure to report everything you do wrong and not do you any favors, or just let you hang yourself and not look out for you (my note: there are minor mistakes that both a T/O and C/R can make and things that can happen that do not rise to the level of calling control that a good crew will smoothly work past). If that's the way you want to have a career, you're in for a very long ride, but maybe it won't be that long after all.

 

Harsh, but it's reality.

 

Being "fast" does not make someone a good T/O or C/R down here, you'll realize this when you talk to anyone with time. The best partners know their jobs, do them correctly and without unnecessary delay (notice I didn't say fast), handle incidents safely, calmly, and correctly, and communicate effectively with their partners, Control, and the passengers. Their operation is also safe and efficient, and their knowledge of the rules is strong. Working with them is usually a "drama free" day. They aren't bro talking you on the IC all day. They aren't pissing off the passengers by making dozens of extra announcements that TA doesn't want them to make, giving the passengers an ear ache. They aren't out being super conductor or super T/O, going above and beyond the call of duty to enforce the rulebook they've written in their minds...they're just doing their job very well. These are the people who get good reputations.

Edited by SubwayGuy
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sorry if I said it wrong, for example

 

if the T/O puts the train into Emergency by accident and he does not REPORT his actions and he attempts to recharge the train , how does the C/R knows he didn't hit anyone? and when he attempts to charge the train can the C/R pull the cord? meaning if he did hit someone and he attempts to recharge and move the train again and end up running over this person can this be murder?  just assuming how would a c/r, know he didn't hit someone without the T/O letting the c/r,rcc,etc know anything up front? sorry if this is confusion if I am jumping the gun here then I will just shut up and un follow this thread if I am giving false information...sorry fellas

 

and regarding the husky bag, when I was in school car majority of school car had this 18 inch bag so this is why I shared this info if the guys want to get a head start..when after training I guess you can do what ever you want ?

Edited by tprashad0719

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I spoke to a conductor this morning at 59th street. He told me that most conductors do not want to stay a conductor for 25 years due to the fact that it's a hard job on the body. You are constantly looking out the window all day at every station. He said many go on to become train operator, essentially he said it's more responsibility but less stressful in the sense that you just drive the train, and that's it. Many conductors get neck pain from stretching their neck out that window to look left and right in order to shut the doors. I'm just passing on the info

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@Lisa, thanks for the info. That's helpful. I think it's also a natural progression from conductor to train operator - you're gaining a knowledge of trains, stations, tracks and signals just by doing your job, listening and observing. Lots of new information and responsibilities in train operator school car, but you've got a very solid background spending a few years as a conductor first.

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That is why many yrs ago Transit did not make the Train Operator Open-Competitive. Thay started that in the year 2000. Otherwise, all those Train Operators pre 2000 were either a Conductor, Cleaner, etc. But remember to each your own. Some people do pass right into Train Operator with no previous title. As they say "off the streets". It's all good. Everyone should have an opportunity. But keep in mind School Car was easier back than now.

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I meant School Car was easier back then than now. How do I know? Other Train Operators & Conductors told me that I spoke to on the road. And think about it. With the Train Operator School Car training now. It use to 1 signal exam. 5 multiple choice & 5 fill-ins. Then it went to 10 multiple choice & 15 fill-ins. Now, 2 signal exams. 1st one, 10 multiple choice & 15 fill-ins. 2nd,15 fill-ins. And then someone told me now they are thinking about doing 3 possibly. I believe Transit will require a 2 year college degree for this position in the next 5-8 yrs. But only time will tell. My advise is get in & get in now. Best of luck to all!!!

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Wrong information once again. They will learn their job when in school car. If the TO accidentally puts the train into emergency, they do not have to pull any cord.... The train already in emergency (It's not the procedure in the rule book if you want to get technical). Pulling cords is based on rules and experience. If you pull cords, and not exactly sure why you pulled it you will be in trouble. Know your job, not what someone told you...

 

Again, they will learn their job while in school car, and get better doing their jobs, after school car. New conductors get into a lot of trouble, for not knowing their jobs or the rules. I been there, seen that, even had to school a couple, and they been out longer than me.

 

Know the rules, not what someone told you. When we were having study groups in school car, if one of us knew an answer to a question, we did not just go by their word of mouth, the person who knew the answer always had to go to the source and show proof. It helped us remember immensely.

 

School car is tough, but it's also the best time of your life in transit.

 

Wrong again... 70% do not have the husky bag. You need the right bag, especially because you will be in school car, and representing your instructors, so you better come correct.

 

I have an mta approved backpack. I haven't used my husky bag since I left school car. If anyone lives in the Bronx $20 and its theirs. Looks brand new..

 

 

Last but not least, it's a good job, conductor and TO... The more you know about your job the easier it will be. Forget all the rah rah people say... You need the cash, your not lazy, you want good benefits, this it the place to be. The are plenty of other jobs out there. This is not the last employer in the world. I never met a conductor or TO who hates the job. It may seem tough at first, because you are new, but its gets easier.

Thank you for the heads up, bro. Good looking out.

 

 

"I would like to thank the good Lord for making me a Yankee."

 

- Joe DiMaggio

Wrong information once again. They will learn their job when in school car. If the TO accidentally puts the train into emergency, they do not have to pull any cord.... The train already in emergency (It's not the procedure in the rule book if you want to get technical). Pulling cords is based on rules and experience. If you pull cords, and not exactly sure why you pulled it you will be in trouble. Know your job, not what someone told you...

 

Again, they will learn their job while in school car, and get better doing their jobs, after school car. New conductors get into a lot of trouble, for not knowing their jobs or the rules. I been there, seen that, even had to school a couple, and they been out longer than me.

 

Know the rules, not what someone told you. When we were having study groups in school car, if one of us knew an answer to a question, we did not just go by their word of mouth, the person who knew the answer always had to go to the source and show proof. It helped us remember immensely.

 

School car is tough, but it's also the best time of your life in transit.

 

Wrong again... 70% do not have the husky bag. You need the right bag, especially because you will be in school car, and representing your instructors, so you better come correct.

 

I have an mta approved backpack. I haven't used my husky bag since I left school car. If anyone lives in the Bronx $20 and its theirs. Looks brand new..

 

 

Last but not least, it's a good job, conductor and TO... The more you know about your job the easier it will be. Forget all the rah rah people say... You need the cash, your not lazy, you want good benefits, this it the place to be. The are plenty of other jobs out there. This is not the last employer in the world. I never met a conductor or TO who hates the job. It may seem tough at first, because you are new, but its gets easier.

I bought it any way. I'm gonna use that or the one I have already.

 

 

"I would like to thank the good Lord for making me a Yankee."

 

- Joe DiMaggio

My goal is to become a conductor then move up to train operator, you gotta start from somewhere.

Nah. I'm staying a Conductor. Don't feel like losing my seniority or starting over again. And I sure as hell do not want to become a boss. Too much crap to deal with and I hate politics.

 

 

"I would like to thank the good Lord for making me a Yankee."

 

- Joe DiMaggio

Okay so what are the Mta approved back packs

For conductors

Well you can definitely use the Husky bag. It's worth the money.

 

 

"I would like to thank the good Lord for making me a Yankee."

 

- Joe DiMaggio

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Thank you for the heads up, bro. Good looking out.

 

 

"I would like to thank the good Lord for making me a Yankee."

 

- Joe DiMaggio

 

I bought it any way. I'm gonna use that or the one I have already.

 

 

"I would like to thank the good Lord for making me a Yankee."

 

- Joe DiMaggio

 

Nah. I'm staying a Conductor. Don't feel like losing my seniority or starting over again. And I sure as hell do not want to become a boss. Too much crap to deal with and I hate politics.

 

 

"I would like to thank the good Lord for making me a Yankee."

 

- Joe DiMaggio

I hear that lol.

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Umm if you yank the cord on a T/O who went BIE I guaranteed that C/R is going downtown and will be explaining himself or herself.

What does BIE mean? That wasn't in the book. I've been writing down all of the acronyms.

 

 

"I would like to thank the good Lord for making me a Yankee."

 

- Joe DiMaggio

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What does BIE mean? That wasn't in the book. I've been writing down all of the acronyms.

 

 

"I would like to thank the good Lord for making me a Yankee."

 

- Joe DiMaggio

Brakes In Emergency Edited by tdevon2012

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I have to put this out there, and clarify a few things on this. This is not directed at tprashad, but rather this is based on my own personal experience and the careers of a LOT of people I know, and everything in this post is intended to serve as a cautionary tale for all of you newer folks, to HELP you in your careers down here. I'm not trying to make anyone feel bad, I'm just telling it like it is. That said:

 

There is a reason the test they give you is basic reading comprehension.

 

They want to see how well you can process written words and interpret and apply them according to their EXACT MEANING. They don't want you to infer, they don't want you to assume, guess, paraphrase, or apply your own logic to a situation.

 

Concerning the above: If the T/O goes into emergency, NOWHERE in TA does it say a conductor must pull the cord. In fact, if you actually do this, Train Operators are taught to report the BIE and attempt to recharge the train. If you, the conductor, have pulled the cord, the train will fail to charge. This can cause the Train Operator to be tricked into believing he has a brake pipe rupture, or some other mechanical defect with the train (especially if he knows why the train went in emergency and you don't volunteer that you have pulled the cord). Therefore, your action will completely unnecessarily delay service beyond the minimal amount of time that it would take for a T/O to notify control of the BIE and the reason (if known). If the cause of the BIE is unknown, then the T/O will have to walk around the train and investigate. If the train fails to recharge, the T/O will have to troubleshoot while doing this. Extra steps = extra delay. If the cause is known, now the T/O will have to walk around and troubleshoot where he wouldn't have otherwise = big extra delay. TA doesn't like delays.

 

Again, I am not singling tprashad out...but why does he think this? Because someone told him something (which could have been incorrect from jump), or he probably misheard, paraphrased, or interpreted it. All you new hires - get familiar with the bulletin concerning conductors and safe train operation (I will not post material for employees only here, but once you're hired...that bulletin is your bread and butter). That goes for any rule book discrepancy. You hear something in the crew room, it sounds like a good idea, or that guy swore that's what the rule said...go home, open the book, get on TENS and read the bulletin, and see what is actually on paper.

 

What the most recent edition of the "Conductors - Safe Train Operation" bulletin actually says is if the train experiences an undesired brakes in emergency, recharges, and moves with no explanation from the Train Operator, then the conductor must pull the cord immediately. Therefore, what can be correctly deduced from the bulletin is that if the train experiences an undesired brakes in emergency, and the T/O or you has notified control center (as per rule) and the T/O has complied with Control's instructions and is trying to see if the train will recharge..then it is a complete waste of everyone's time for the conductor to pull a cord not in compliance with every rule and bulletin TA has. And if you do this, you WILL rightfully get blamed for making a delay in service worse. And you will be asked to submit a written report, and it better not have some BS that you "heard" in a crew room, or your assumption based on a partially correct or misquoted bulletin. That's how you get days in the street down here. The crew is a "team" you are not out to snitch on each other, you are each out to help each other and get through the day. But if one of you screws up, that person own it. Cover ups are a big deal, so stay away from all that noise. Know your job, and do your job. You're a conductor, not a policeman trying to hit a Train Operator quota every month.

 

If you take the time to read and learn the bulletins, and keep learning every day...it is not that difficult of a job. If you believe everything you hear in a crew room, kinda sorta understand part of the bulletins, and generally wing it based on your mood that day...then you will develop a reputation and at TA reputation is everything. No one will want to work with you, when you get the seniority to pick, people will avoid you. People will treat you like the plague when they have to work with you (some might even book off sick! the thought of working with you made them puke their guts out!). If others have an axe to grind because of something you pulled working with them, they will be sure to report everything you do wrong and not do you any favors, or just let you hang yourself and not look out for you (my note: there are minor mistakes that both a T/O and C/R can make and things that can happen that do not rise to the level of calling control that a good crew will smoothly work past). If that's the way you want to have a career, you're in for a very long ride, but maybe it won't be that long after all.

 

Harsh, but it's reality.

 

Being "fast" does not make someone a good T/O or C/R down here, you'll realize this when you talk to anyone with time. The best partners know their jobs, do them correctly and without unnecessary delay (notice I didn't say fast), handle incidents safely, calmly, and correctly, and communicate effectively with their partners, Control, and the passengers. Their operation is also safe and efficient, and their knowledge of the rules is strong. Working with them is usually a "drama free" day. They aren't bro talking you on the IC all day. They aren't pissing off the passengers by making dozens of extra announcements that TA doesn't want them to make, giving the passengers an ear ache. They aren't out being super conductor or super T/O, going above and beyond the call of duty to enforce the rulebook they've written in their minds...they're just doing their job very well. These are the people who get good reputations.

Again, thank you for the information. I do not want to rat anyone out. Just want to do my job correctly & go home at the end of the day. That's it.

 

 

"I would like to thank the good Lord for making me a Yankee."

 

- Joe DiMaggio

Brake In Emergency

Thanks, bro. I'll write that down ASAP!

 

 

"I would like to thank the good Lord for making me a Yankee."

 

- Joe DiMaggio

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I hear that lol.

Yeah, dude. I know the TO's make more money but too many headaches to deal with.

 

 

"I would like to thank the good Lord for making me a Yankee."

 

- Joe DiMaggio

Hey Amm0, you never answered my question from last night but if you don't want to then it's fine.

 

 

"I would like to thank the good Lord for making me a Yankee."

 

- Joe DiMaggio

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currently the C/O makes 21 per hr and T/O 32 per hour yard pay and when they go on Revenue train ( passengers) they should make around 36 per hour

 

I know a conductor who just made 4 years and gets paid 30.11 per hour and don't forget night diff

 

 

 

AGAIN GUYS , don't quote me on my words..i am sure I will be corrected

Edited by tprashad0719

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@Tprashad, the conductor who just made 4 years in service is earning $30.11/hour base pay? Doing train work or as a construction flagger?

 

That's a reasonable hourly rate. Train operators do have a lot more to learn and remember - they should make more.

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currently the C/O makes 21 per hr and T/O 32 per hour yard pay and when they go on Revenue train ( passengers) they should make around 36 per hour

 

I know a conductor who just made 4 years and gets paid 30.11 per hour and don't forget night diff

 

 

 

AGAIN GUYS , don't quote me on my words..i am sure I will be corrected

Not sure how much TO's make but I know Conductor's make $21.07 starting and $30 an hour at top pay but you also have to include Sunday's (double time) and night differential.

 

 

"I would like to thank the good Lord for making me a Yankee."

 

- Joe DiMaggio

@Tprashad, the conductor who just made 4 years in service is earning $30.11/hour base pay? Doing train work or as a construction flagger?

 

That's a reasonable hourly rate. Train operators do have a lot more to learn and remember - they should make more.

TO's have more responsibility and their schooling is a lot longer. Nine months if memory serves.

 

 

"I would like to thank the good Lord for making me a Yankee."

 

- Joe DiMaggio

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