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Y2Julio

Conductor 8094 Hiring Process

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@Qnzbound,

 

Do you work much OT?

Do you get ordered to work double shifts?

So far the only OT ive gotten has come in the form of late clears and no lunches. I had one job that paid more than 8hrs. When i call the crew office ive been getting regular jobs that pay about 8hrs. I havent had the senario where im sitting on board for hrs then get a 8hrs job.

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To be honest, i wasnt as nervous as i thought i would be.That being said, once youre done with posting, youll be ready to go. The night before, i was stressing. Then the day comes and its show time and youll quickly settle in. Things are a lot faster on the road as youll see during posting. Its kind of annoying having a TSS ride with you or checking up on you at some point on your route everyday. Terminal operations are probably the most nerve racking since youre up against the clock. I no longer adhere to the 2 minutes prior rule... im on my train AS SOON AS IT PULLS IN. youre going to need all of those 5-9 minutes (assuming you get even that much). There are gaps in training, or maybe i wasnt paying attention, but youll learn:

 

1)To just get on your train whether you saw your T/O get on or not

 

2) Whether to shut down your train for a relay or leave it open for the next crew

 

3) Improper zoning DOES indeed happen in real life. Got hit with a improper zoned train at Parkchester, after building up confidence in my abilities taking the 6 out of Pelham.

 

4) You get more confident each day. It becomes second nature. Give it a week and youll be used to the equipment, radio chatter, and addressing customer questions.

 

5) how to communicate with your partner. Some people dont like hearing the buzzer, or dont want you to bother them on the IC asking for the line up.

 

6) Take notes on every trip. If you get held at a station, anything unusual during your run, anything that might be called into question later on.

 

7)Most of the people down there are cool. Some of the ATDs and TDs come off a little aloof, but theyre just busy and will get to you if you speak up.... so speak up!

 

8) dont be afraid to ask questions. Had a G.O. job this weekend and they can be extremely overwhelming to understand and then explain to customers on the road, so MAKE SURE, you have all the details written down and easily accessible. We had a good TSS that broke it down for us newbies, took us almost 30 mins to get it, but whatever it takes.

 

9) Go here: http://www.mta.info/schedules print out the strip maps for each individual line in your division. Make them smalller if you can, and keep a stack of em and tape them up inside your cab for quick reference. Youll be asked all kinds of questions at main hubs (34th, 42nd etc) if you cant answer, point them to the nearest platform conductor and keep it moving.

 

 

Im learning more everyday. You will too. The nerves will pass.

10) Look on the payroll to get the name and pass # of the train operator you'll be with.

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Aww man I finally got some down time. Meeting my class at 207. School car is an experience and then some. If you're starting good luck. You will get it believe me.

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Very interesting new info by qnzbound. Thank you qnz :)

 

A small question.

 

If the subway cars are already at the specific number that they need to roll out and start revenue service. Then why do train operators need to cut and add them?

 

Also it sounds like cutting and adding cars is a pain. If you have one subway car in the middle do you have move all those cars behind and infront of it ? Does it take a long time?

 

Sent from my SPH-L710 using Tapatalk

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Hello, i got in to traffic enforcement( April 3) but don't know how the process will go. A question to ask because i am deaf on my right side only. I speak English  okay but not good enough. Is the deafness going to disqualify me or no for  conductor ?


To be honest, i wasnt as nervous as i thought i would be.That being said, once youre done with posting, youll be ready to go. The night before, i was stressing. Then the day comes and its show time and youll quickly settle in. Things are a lot faster on the road as youll see during posting. Its kind of annoying having a TSS ride with you or checking up on you at some point on your route everyday. Terminal operations are probably the most nerve racking since youre up against the clock. I no longer adhere to the 2 minutes prior rule... im on my train AS SOON AS IT PULLS IN. youre going to need all of those 5-9 minutes (assuming you get even that much). There are gaps in training, or maybe i wasnt paying attention, but youll learn:

1)To just get on your train whether you saw your T/O get on or not

2) Whether to shut down your train for a relay or leave it open for the next crew

3) Improper zoning DOES indeed happen in real life. Got hit with a improper zoned train at Parkchester, after building up confidence in my abilities taking the 6 out of Pelham.

4) You get more confident each day. It becomes second nature. Give it a week and youll be used to the equipment, radio chatter, and addressing customer questions.

5) how to communicate with your partner. Some people dont like hearing the buzzer, or dont want you to bother them on the IC asking for the line up.

6) Take notes on every trip. If you get held at a station, anything unusual during your run, anything that might be called into question later on.

7)Most of the people down there are cool. Some of the ATDs and TDs come off a little aloof, but theyre just busy and will get to you if you speak up.... so speak up!

8) dont be afraid to ask questions. Had a G.O. job this weekend and they can be extremely overwhelming to understand and then explain to customers on the road, so MAKE SURE, you have all the details written down and easily accessible. We had a good TSS that broke it down for us newbies, took us almost 30 mins to get it, but whatever it takes.

9) Go here: http://www.mta.info/schedules print out the strip maps for each individual line in your division. Make them smalller if you can, and keep a stack of em and tape them up inside your cab for quick reference. Youll be asked all kinds of questions at main hubs (34th, 42nd etc) if you cant answer, point them to the nearest platform conductor and keep it moving.


Im learning more everyday. You will too. The nerves will pass.

Nice information to share, thank you :D d train operator don't always use the same train because d train, i see the cab/coach number that inside the train always different for the same conductor.

Edited by mattfutureconductor5

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Just passed my midterm and yard practical

Congrats. The road practical is MUCH easier in comparison. Just know the proper announcements/ proceedures and use the vision glass to your advantage when looking for your board. And DONT call out what you think it is till the train comes to a complete stop, like i did. Lol. Other than that, when you get a nornal station stop. Do what youve been practicing. Point, open doors, announcements, close properly, keep it moving. Just like when posting.

@Qnzbound

How was the road practical? And which superintendent did you have?

 

Just passed my yard and Midterm.

Road practical was a little nerve racking because of the pressure but my whole class passed, just know your announcements and try to memorize a few stops. You may not get to make the full station announcement but be prepared. Youll do fine.

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Got two days on the road alone already been going real smooth so far.

Dont forget to take notes on any job that you work. This is something ive gotten away from but need to get back to. basically once you finish your job, write down if you liked it, hated it, how was your partner, did you get to take lunch, was there money on the job etc, how many trips, did you end where you started? etc. Were a while away from being able to pick a job BUT these notes will help when it does come time to pick.

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hey can anyone tell me how and if its hard to get on and off the train from train yard just found

Not hard at all it's basic nothing to even think about

This job ain't for everybody me myself I'm already second guessing if I'm going to stay here or go back to my old job idk how much longer I could take going back and forth on a train different hours every week I have lost 15 lbs since I started a month ago barely get to see my girl and kids. I salute all the ppl that been doing this for over 20 years. I'll make my decision by the end of the month.

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hey can anyone tell me how and if its hard to get on and off the train from train yard just found 

 

To give you an idea, click here (in between 2 minutes & 2 minutes, 20 seconds), here (at one minute & 15 seconds), here (between 35 & 55 seconds), here (between 2 minutes, 40 seconds & 3 minutes) & here (between 5:20 & 5:25). It's not that hard at all, just a matter of pulling yourself up.

 

Although the general public is not allowed to go into any of the yards, just to give you an idea of what to expect, I would invite you to check out the intersection of Queens Boulevard and 82nd Avenue. There you'll see the R33 9075, and what you'll have to deal with on a regular basis. From going there in the past and doing some measurements, it's 27 inches from the rail to the step, then another 16 inches from the step to the car, for a total of 43 inches (close to 4 feet).

 

In addition, in order to practice if the Shore Line Trolley Museum, where they have an R-17 & an R-9, is too far for you to visit, then I would suggest going to the local playground, when the children are not there, and just practice climbing up and down the monkey bars. If you do this, in addition to some simple exercises, like push-ups, then it shouldn't be too hard.

 

Any more questions? If so, please do not hesitate to ask!!

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One of my friends who just became a conductor and he told me if you don't stretch before climbing up you might pull something. It's simple once you get the hang of it like most things. But the first few times it might catch you off guard. Simply because your scratching your legs beyond what your use to if you don't work out.

 

Also the stair master is a good exercise especially that initial step up on to the machine. It'll give you a good idea of what it's like.

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Re climbing up, it's not that difficult. Just be careful and do it the way they show you how - take things slow, be careful and keep your eyes open, just like you'll be doing walking through the yard on your way to the train.

 

Re the 8094 list, are they calling classes from it again? And are they back into heavy hiring for conductors?

I'm just trying to get a sense of hiring needs and budget to hire people.

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