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Were the R143s tested on the Washington Metro?


LTA1992

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I doubt that, although why would New York City Subway cars be tested anywhere other than:

 

1. The factory the subway car came from?

2: The New York City Subway?

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I doubt that, although why would New York City Subway cars be tested anywhere other than:

 

1. The factory the subway car came from?

2: The New York City Subway?

 

I think it was for public review. Like the R110s were. I guess the DC Metro was planning to redesign their car cars. Probably the 7000 series.

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The DC system is of different gauge also. It was just impossible.

 

That is incorrect. The Washington Metro uses the standard track gauge (4 ft 8 1⁄2 inches) which is the same that the MTA uses.

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Source? Philly is a different gauge, but Washington is standard.

 

Actually, i believe the only system in the US that does not go by the standard gauge system is PATH. But they could have retrofitted the R143s with DC motors. It's possible.

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Actually, i believe the only system in the US that does not go by the standard gauge system is PATH. But they could have retrofitted the R143s with DC motors. It's possible.

 

sorry to say, but also wrong

path uses standard guage

 

BART is the only system that uses non standard guage

infact it's broad guage.

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sorry to say, but also wrong

path uses standard guage

 

BART is the only system that uses non standard guage

infact it's broad guage.

 

Correct. It's because the wider base provides more stability at high speeds & in earthquakes in which the ground can move several feet. PATH uses a different loading gauge, not track gauge. PATH (H&M RR) had to contend with building a sturdy tunnel in river mud, so their resulting railcars tend to be oddly sized with a narrow roof, a knee, and wide floors inside relative to their length. BART is totally different.

 

- A

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Yes, BART is the only heavy rail system that I know of in America that has a different gauge. Path shares tracks before with the main line Commuter and Freight before in NJ. NYC Subway can also run on Commuter Rail if power current is lowered. And Philly's SEPTA can run with commuter rail as well. That said the R-143 could run on Washington Metro but the power current needs to be lowered to NYC Subway's current (550v I believe)?

 

NO! As I stated above, the Market-Frankford El is broad gauge. And the NYC subway 3rd rail is between 600 and 650 volts DC depending on how far you are from a substation.

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Alright, but I need source, B)!

 

It's something that railroaders know as common knowledge, or at least it was. Remember I work up at BERA, we have some old Philly trolleys, I might have some idea about what I am talking about.

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