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El person

Whats the point of the (W)?

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I never got why they have the (W). It was useful when they were doing Manhattan Bridge repairs, but can't Astoria riders just switch to the (R) if they want local service?

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That's the point of the (W), so Astoria riders who want local service won't have to switch for a different train later on.

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That's the point of the (W), so Astoria riders who want local service won't have to switch for a different train later on.

 

That and extra Broadway service since in the (R) can be unreliable.

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I never got why they have the (W). It was useful when they were doing Manhattan Bridge repairs, but can't Astoria riders just switch to the (R) if they want local service?

 

It was based off a few early services, first the EE Queens Blvd/Broadway to Whitehall then a rush hour alternate <N> from 71 Continental to Whitehall

 

Then in 86-87 it was yellow (;) Astoria/Broadway/West End via Bridge and (N) was moved to the Broadway Local.

 

Then from 88-01 they didnt need it since (N) could only go that way.

 

Currently its additional service for Astoria Riders, I wonder the same thing since I cant imagine theres that many astorians who need a one seat ride to Whitehall St.

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The (R) actually carries quite a bit of its own load from Queens Blvd onto the Broadway Local; the (W) helps it out, especially when the (R) bunches up sometimes. The (W) is also an alternative just in case the (R) is crowded from Brooklyn; you almost always have a chance of getting a seat going northbound from Whitehall until at least Canal Street. Finally, it doesn't matter what train you take north of 34th St going to Astoria, and the (W) could even out the load on the (N) by taking some passengers instead of everyone crowding onto the (N). That's my theory.

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That and extra Broadway service since in the (R) can be unreliable.

 

You said it!

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The (W) was originally for Broadway Express Service after 2001. (N)(R) via Broadway Local (Q)<Q>(W) as Broadway Express, Since the (;)(D) was split running only from Norwood the Bronx to 34th St Manhattan while the Northern 6th Ave Tracks at Manhttan Bridge was being fixed up..

 

(W) Ran Express on the Astoria Line[i think rush hour peak, AM to Manhattan and PM to Astoria], train ran Express on Broadway Line and via Bridge, 4th Ave Exp and West End Local to Coney Island. Replaced the (:P via West End/4th Ave Exp

 

(Q) as it is now via Broadway Exp and Brighton Local [Replaced the (D) Brighton Local]

 

<Q> as Broadway Exp and Brighton Exp [Replaced the (Q6) 6th Ave-Brighton Beach Exp]

 

Once 2004 came in (:P(D) service was restored to Coney Island but changed things a bit..

 

(B) replaced the <Q> as the Brighton Beach Express

(D) Replaced the (W) as the 4th Ave Exp/West End Local

(N) Replaced the (W) as Express Service in Manhattan which ran via Bridge During the day eve and late nights via Whitehall. Local during Weekend via Bridge

(Q) Remain the same, tho cut back to Brighton breach due to CI Rehab, which was later restored, same for (F) ending at Ave X and (N) at 86th St, Kings County.

<Q> Discontinued replaced by (B)

(W) Replaced the (N) local and ran to Whitehall St during the weekdays only and Astoria Express Service was cut.

(S) Grand St Replaced by (B)(D)

(M)(R) also saw changes but related to schedule not detoured..

 

The (W) is needed to replace the (N) as Local for customers on the Astoria Line who want Broadway Service and to provide extra service since the (R) as INDman says is unreliable at most..

 

1986-88 a bit diffrent of course with Yellow (B)(D)(Q) via Broadway and so on.. But i'll keep it simple..

 

I remember seeing in the 1979 map the (M) ran via Brigiton, i wonder if that has something to do with the Chrystie Street connection?

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We defidently need the (W),especially the AM and PM put-ins that go to and come from Kings Hwy in Bklyn via the Sea Beach (N)/via Whitehall (R).

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Agreed with above posters.

 

The R isn't reliable as the only local on Broadway, the W is very useful in helping out the R. Broadway needs 2 locals. And this allows the N to run as an express. It's a win win for everyone as the W allows for extra trains to run in Queens and allow Astoria riders a one seat local line than to wait 'forever' for an R to show up [and most likely crowded].

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We defidently need the (W),especially the AM and PM put-ins that go to and come from Kings Hwy in Bklyn via the Sea Beach (N)/via Whitehall (R).

 

But thats not a regular service (W) thats just the (W) coming from being relayed on the Sea Beach/CI area, (W)s mainline is the Astoria -Broadway Line.. So idk how is that an important issue since the (M) is provided during the rush hour, (R) always, except late nights and (N) as Express except late night as local.

 

I'm so glade the (W) mainly starts at Whitehall St, when it hits 14th St, the (R) gets packed completely, since it came from Kings, while the (W) just started a few stations down.. (V)(W) sounds kinda the same..

 

This issue sounds more like The (2)(5) when the (5) only ran during Rush Hours to Flatbush leaving the (2) alone on the Nostrands..

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I remember seeing in the 1979 map the (M) ran via Brigiton, i wonder if that has something to do with the Chrystie Street connection?

 

I dont think The (M)ikey used that connection.

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I dont think The (M)ikey used that connection.

 

Correct. The (M) simply left DeKalb and crossed to the Brighton Line right before Atlantic Avenue. Same for Manhattan-Bound Trains. Chrystie St was pre- November 26, 1967.

 

 

Long live the (W)!

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No, (R) is for ®etarted....theres always something wrong on that line.

 

Lol!!! It's too darn slow, that's the only thing I don't like about it. It's not infrequent like other lines are, particularly the (C) with its 7 TPH at the height of the rush, but it feels like you're crawling like a snail when you take that train.

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I say the (W) is a compliment of the (N). It usually takes the load off the (N) in Astoria and the (R) in Broadway, Manhattan. At least the Astoria residents get a direct route to and from Lower Manhattan.

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That's why I think that they should have (W) travel into Brooklyn, via 4 Av loc with the (R). Travel either via West End to Bay Pkwy replacing (M) (weekdays or just rush hours), or to via Sea Beach with (N) terminating at either, 86 St or King Hwy (weekdays or just rush hours). Most doesn't ride the (M), because it only goes to lower Manhattan and back to Brooklyn (via Willy B Bridge). Most people choose the (D)(N)(R) to travel to Manhattan, Midtown/Uptown, The Bronx, or Queens. It would provide better service via Brooklyn & Manhattan loc helping the (R), to reduce some heavy loads. MTA needs to put money into better use, by providing quality service, something that we want. I really bet that when Mta makes (W) travel into Brooklyn, most people will use it to balance out the (R).

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That's why I think that they should have (W) travel into Brooklyn, via 4 Av loc with the (R). Travel either via West End to Bay Pkwy replacing (M) (weekdays or just rush hours), or to via Sea Beach with (N) terminating at either, 86 St or King Hwy (weekdays or just rush hours). Most doesn't ride the (M), because it only goes to lower Manhattan and back to Brooklyn (via Willy B Bridge). Most people choose the (D)(N)(R) to travel to Manhattan, Midtown/Uptown, The Bronx, or Queens. It would provide better service via Brooklyn & Manhattan loc helping the (R), to reduce some heavy loads. MTA needs to put money into better use, by providing quality service, something that we want. I really bet that when Mta makes (W) travel into Brooklyn, most people will use it to balance out the (R).

 

The (W) is not for Brooklyn riders, it's primary purpose is to relieve overcrowding on the Astoria Line. It is cheaper for the TA to operate (N)'s and (W)'s instead of doubling (N) service. The resources saved can be utilized in other manners. Sending (W)'s to Brooklyn would be a waste of money; 4th Avenue already has four services...five if you include the late PM and early AM (W)'s to/from Coney Island Yard.

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the (W) isn't a bad line and it can be depended on when the (R) screws up so it's more than a supplemental line and less than a stand-alone line but it still serves a purpose

 

Sea Beach Express...it failed in the 60s it'll probably fail now lol

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I only ride the n, r, w, lines for two stops going to work every day. (59th and lexington) Just having the w there, definitely helps when i miss the n, or the r. More often, i see the n/w before i see the r.

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