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Teachers Caught Naked


Dan05979

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every new teacher goes through that phase. the problem is not having "real world experience", the problem is that new teachers have absolutely no support once they are in the field. :tdown:

 

Hahahahaha..."real world experience"...talk about your all time buzz words and catch phrases. I'm glad you pointed this out...it feels like at least 3 times a week I tell college grads or college seniors I know NOT to say this to an employer on an interview. It makes you sound like an idiot who doesn't know what they're talking about...plus everyone else says it anyway.

 

100% agreed. Plus as a friend who is a teacher has told me on numerous occasions, one of the things that they do NOT prepare you for in college when you are studying education, is how to deal with parents and the politics of the school system especially when the principals/assistant principals/deans start getting involved, and the teacher is in the middle between their boss and the parents.

 

And that's not "real world experience" for someone to get out of the bubble...it's there and everyone knows it from the time you are 9 years old and you see that other kid's parent arguing about grades with the teacher...but school does not prepare them for it...so if they don't expect it, its them being naive, but if they don't know how to handle it it's because they've never been prepared for it. "Real world experience" is bunk spouted by career services offices in colleges and high schools throughout the country.

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I'm torn between two sides.

 

Side #1- The janitor should have left them alone. They were minding their own business in an empty classroom.

 

Side #2- They shouldn't have been lovemaking in a school. The students are there :P

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every new teacher goes through that phase. the problem is not having "real world experience", the problem is that new teachers have absolutely no support once they are in the field. :tdown:

 

It's because public schools really don't give a rat's ass about students, and it gets worse in high school. No wonder why so many kids hate school when they get out (that is, if they do get out). I'm not trying to bash public high schools (and I wouldn't really know much about them because I didn't go to one, so excuse me for the bias if any), but serious reform is needed if we want a better future for the children.

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School in general no longer teaches the values and common sense to get by in the world. I went through school during the "period of change" if you will, and the schooling I got as a young kid was very different (and I would say better than) the schooling I got as I got older.

 

As second and third graders we were exposed to more "officially through school" than we were as 8th graders.

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Ok, so I've chatted amongst my sources within the Dept of Ed. The Janitor did not "snitch on them" they got in trouble because they mouthed off to School Security who were going to ignore the issue but since they got snappy with them, they called the Assistant Principal and it went up the ladder there.

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Ok, so I've chatted amongst my sources within the Dept of Ed. The Janitor did not "snitch on them" they got in trouble because they mouthed off to School Security who were going to ignore the issue but since they got snappy with them, they called the Assistant Principal and it went up the ladder there.

 

Thanks for confirming this.

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Ok, so I've chatted amongst my sources within the Dept of Ed. The Janitor did not "snitch on them" they got in trouble because they mouthed off to School Security who were going to ignore the issue but since they got snappy with them, they called the Assistant Principal and it went up the ladder there.

 

The media strikes again. Another story that was spot on accurate. I had a feeling there was more too it that the janitor ratting on them. When I was working as a janitor, that would have been the last thing on my mind.

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Other countries have the lower grades going to school earlier, and the higher ones going to school later, which has a larger impact than just number of days. Plus, how long you sit inside a building will never affect how much you learn while there. You need to be interested and engaged in the subject. Talk about china etc, those poor kids get ignored and belittled by their parents if they don't do well in school so don't even begin to compare. Also, other countries don't have as many students as we do, remember our country is #3 in population behind china and india at 350 million. We also don't have the funding some smaller populated countries do. It's a lose-lose-lose situation, which is why it's so bad.

 

As for teachers naked, were they, or was it just an accusation?

 

- A

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:confused: Personally, I think this whole thing is completely and utterly stupid. On the one hand, they are two consenting adults and everyone else was in the auditorium so there was little if any chance of a student getting an eyeful (although I am reasonably sure most of the male students wish they had). However, I think they should have gotten a room rather than doing it on the job, both because of a basic sense of decorum and because of the repercussions against the UFT. Bloomberg as as bad as Reagan was when it comes to his need to break unions, and these two fools have just given him an excuse to come after the teachers' union.

To those who argue that we should not have young, physically attractive teachers in school because of situations like this, I would like to take this time to emphatically disagree. My school has just had a massive influx of beautiful young women who have come to teach, and many of them would not only never behave like this themselves but would be disgusted if they saw anyone else doing it(I know because I have become rather friendly with one of them). The only teacher at my school that I know of who behaved in a sexually inappropriate manner was a fifty-year-old man who tried to cover up either his laziness or his incompetence (I am not sure which) with an epically foul mouth and an utterly juvenile sense of humor.

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:confused: Personally, I think this whole thing is completely and utterly stupid. On the one hand, they are two consenting adults and everyone else was in the auditorium so there was little if any chance of a student getting an eyeful (although I am reasonably sure most of the male students wish they had).
Did you skip over my post? I suggest you read it. School security WAS going to ignore it but the teachers got snappy with security so security notified the proper channels.
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Did you skip over my post? I suggest you read it. School security WAS going to ignore it but the teachers got snappy with security so security notified the proper channels.

 

My mistake. My point is, the act was regrettable for its idiocy and the teachers were doubly stupid for raising the issue with security when the whole thing was going to blow over, but i disagree with B35 that this is a product of teachers entering the classroom too young.

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but i disagree with B35 that this is a product of teachers entering the classroom too young.

 

i disagree as well.

 

i taught for 7 years before i got called for conductor, albeit it was in a preschool. it is not "just a job." the first year can make or break a teacher of any age because you have no choice but to let it consume your life. it is a challenge. the obstacles you have to face on a daily basis and the stress of it all is overwhelming. as time goes on it gets easier but some just can't handle it because once they get into the field they hardly get any support from administrators. they are expected to prepare (on their own time) and implement all these great learning experiences in their classroom with no guidance, no resources, outdated materials, little to no supplies... not to mention, an overcrowded classroom with an assistant teacher if you are lucky (which is a whole 'nother story) with 25-30 different personalities and developmental needs that needs to be differentiated. you are completely on your own.

 

the system seems to set up new teachers to fail. they have been trying to change that within recent years though, but the turnover rate still remains high. it happened to me during my first year and quitting did pass my mind on multiple occasions. it seemed like the easy way out. it has nothing to do with age, it has to do with patience and dedication. ask any teacher (tenured or not) about their first year, they will verify this.

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I will stop you BOTH right there. Let's not derail the topic.

 

__________________________________________________________________

 

I already told my opinion on this

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i disagree as well.

 

i taught for 7 years before i got called for conductor, albeit it was in a preschool. it is not "just a job." the first year can make or break a teacher of any age because you have no choice but to let it consume your life. it is a challenge. the obstacles you have to face on a daily basis and the stress of it all is overwhelming. as time goes on it gets easier but some just can't handle it because once they get into the field they hardly get any support from administrators. they are expected to prepare (on their own time) and implement all these great learning experiences in their classroom with no guidance, no resources, outdated materials, little to no supplies... not to mention, an overcrowded classroom with an assistant teacher if you are lucky (which is a whole 'nother story) with 25-30 different personalities and developmental needs that needs to be differentiated. you are completely on your own.

 

the system seems to set up new teachers to fail. they have been trying to change that within recent years though, but the turnover rate still remains high. it happened to me during my first year and quitting did pass my mind on multiple occasions. it seemed like the easy way out. it has nothing to do with age, it has to do with patience and dedication. ask any teacher (tenured or not) about their first year, they will verify this.

We'll just disagree then... it's not the end of the world...

 

But if it's one thing I want to point out... it's that... there's a difference b/w me sayin "it's looked upon as just a job".... and flat out saying "it's just a job" (which I never said)...

 

iono, maybe you didn't feel that way when you taught for your 7 years... but I would love to know how many teachers (hell, or even just a percentage) that started teaching whenever you did... that have taught just as long, or longer....

 

You just stated a multitude of reasons why there is a high turnover rate in that profession... I highly doubt that age has "nothing" to do with it, though.... I'm sorry, but if I was a high school student (or even a JHS student) with a 20/21 year old teacher (man or woman), I wouldn't take that person near as serious as I would an older teacher (say, in their 30's).... and from the looks of things, neither do a lot of these kids (although, there are many more reasons why kids act the way they do in the classroom in this generation of kids, compared to the 70's babies, and us 80's babies).....

 

The rest of your post, I'm not disputing.....

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We'll just disagree then... it's not the end of the world...

 

But if it's one thing I want to point out... it's that... there's a difference b/w me sayin "it's looked upon as just a job".... and flat out saying "it's just a job" (which I never said)...

 

iono, maybe you didn't feel that way when you taught for your 7 years... but I would love to know how many teachers (hell, or even just a percentage) that started teaching whenever you did... that have taught just as long, or longer....

 

You just stated a multitude of reasons why there is a high turnover rate in that profession... I highly doubt that age has "nothing" to do with it, though.... I'm sorry, but if I was a high school student (or even a JHS student) with a 20/21 year old teacher (man or woman), I wouldn't take that person near as serious as I would an older teacher (say, in their 30's).... and from the looks of things, neither do a lot of these kids (although, there are many more reasons why kids act the way they do in the classroom in this generation of kids, compared to the 70's babies, and us 80's babies).....

 

The rest of your post, I'm not disputing.....

 

i never said it was the end of the world... just trying to enlighten you with the realities of what new teachers have to face - which is the main reason turnover rates are so high - regardless of their age.

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i never said it was the end of the world... just trying to enlighten you with the realities of what new teachers have to face - which is the main reason turnover rates are so high - regardless of their age.

 

I know you didn't... relax...

 

...and I took in the rest of the post... thanks....

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