Jump to content
Attention: In order to reply to messages, create topics, have access to other features of the community you must sign up for an account.

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Trainspotter

Transit worker calms, grabs wouldbe jumper on Williamsburg bridge

Recommended Posts

Transit worker calms, grabs wouldbe jumper on Williamsburg bridge

BY JONATHAN LEMIRE

DAILY NEWS STAFF WRITER

Friday, January 18th 2008

 

[float=right]amd_bodai.jpg

Maisel/News

Thomas Bodai working the tracks.

[/float]Resourceful transit workers inspecting the Williamsburg Bridge Thursday used reassuring words and quick action to prevent a suicidal man from leaping into the river below.

 

Track inspector Thomas Bodai was on a path alongside the subway track on the bridge's lower level at 10:30 a.m. when he spotted a clearly distraught man walking in a restricted area near the electrified third rail.

 

"As soon as he saw me coming, he hopped over a railing and made like he was going to jump," Bodai said. "He was saying his wife just passed away, and that he didn't want to live no more."

 

The weeping man - described by Bodai as a Latino in his 40s wearing a red hooded sweatshirt - warned the transit workers to keep their distance.

 

"He said he didn't want to hurt us when he jumped," said Bodai, who has been with the Transit Authority for nine years. "He said he wanted to be with his wife again."

 

As one of his four co-workers called police, Bodai started talking to the man and learned that his first name was Tony, he said.

 

"I started talking to him, calling him by his name, and he asked what my name was," Bodai said. "I offered him a cigarette, and I wanted to keep him talking.

 

"I think that made a connection with him," Bodai said.

 

After Tony ordered the cops arriving on the bridge to stay far from him, he looked away from Bodai - allowing the transit worker to quickly act.

 

"I just jumped at him, grabbed him and pulled him away from the ledge," said Bodai, 39. "He fought me, but I held on."

 

As Bodai's partner Bruce Cierniewski helped restrain Tony, the weeping man said that he tried to seek psychiatric help at Woodhull Hospital earlier that day but was turned away.

 

A call seeking comment from Woodhull was not immediately returned.

 

After Tony was removed by ambulance to receive treatment, Bodai told the Daily News that he was grateful to have been able to help.

 

"I feel like a million dollars, man," said Bodai, who is married and has two children. "I don't know the guy, but I felt good that I saved him."

 

Elliot Sander, CEO of the Metropolitan Transportation Authority, hailed the workers who went to the distraught man's aid.

 

"I am proud, but not surprised, that these men are employees of MTA New York City Transit," he said.

 

alg_jumper.jpg

Roca/News

Quick thinking by a track inspector helped rescue a man who planned to jump

from the Williamsburg Bridge.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow, a job well done! Those guys really went above and beyond the call.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I would of said "hurry up before the cops arrive, and do a belly flop".
Yeah I'm sure that would of really helped the guy -.-

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Yeah I'm sure that would of really helped the guy -.-

 

 

Some people are born into this world, never knowing what a family is. He is a grown man, about to commit suicide because he lost his wife? People live people die, that's life, and if someone wants to off themselves because they lost a loved one.......Only the strong survive.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Some people are born into this world, never knowing what a family is. He is a grown man, about to commit suicide because he lost his wife? People live people die, that's life, and if someone wants to off themselves because they lost a loved one.......Only the strong survive.

 

Very well said. Some people are just so misguided that for them, there is no other way.

 

A couple of years ago, a 15-year-old boy from my neighborhood took his own life by throwing himself in front of the train. His mother was severely mentally ill, his father dead, and his brother in jail. He just saw no other way out. If he had told me he was going to kill himself, I wouldn't have tried to coax him otherwise; I'd have just said, "Go ahead and do it." Sometimes you just have to let people make decisions, even when they're bad ones.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Very well said. Some people are just so misguided that for them, there is no other way.

 

A couple of years ago, a 15-year-old boy from my neighborhood took his own life by throwing himself in front of the train. His mother was severely mentally ill, his father dead, and his brother in jail. He just saw no other way out. If he had told me he was going to kill himself, I wouldn't have tried to coax him otherwise; I'd have just said, "Go ahead and do it." Sometimes you just have to let people make decisions, even when they're bad ones.

 

Alright, a 15 year old boy is a different issue than a grown man. I would of tried to talk someone of that age, out of suicide. He needs a family at that age, and with the family being that screwed up, I can understand a person of that age thinking of no other way out. He suppose to be in school, and have to go home to this cluster F'd life.

 

When I had worked the Bx21, a 20 year old man was talking to me and asked me about how he can collect his social security check, which was coming in his brothers name, and about the prices of apartments. We spoke, and I found out his mother died when he was 15, his father (well who knows), and he was suppose to be staying with his older brother, but was now in a room (or boarding house type place). he said he was going to the doctor for psychological reasons, and that is why he wasn't get the checks directly to him. I told him my mother died when I was 19, and I was on my own then (father was around, but never lived with him). I told him things won't be easy and you have to do for you, and only you. Get your credit straight, he did have a job, etc.... He said to me " did you ever feel like just ending it all". I told him "no, and he better not ever get that idea in his head again". I told him we both are young, some people are born without mother or father, and some just will have it harder in life. Everyone can't have it easy. Put his best foot forward, keep working to get that better job, and he will always be broke living by himself, paying for everything, but I've been there, and now 8 years later, things are calming down, and I can see money left in my account. Hanging out with friends, blowing money in bars, clubs, etc..., will be once in a while and most of the time put on the back burners. We have no one else to turn to for money, like some grown men do (still asking mommy for money). We have to be more responsible, and this will make a better man out of him, and he will know what is important in life.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Alright, a 15 year old boy is a different issue than a grown man. I would of tried to talk someone of that age, out of suicide. He needs a family at that age, and with the family being that screwed up, I can understand a person of that age thinking of no other way out. He suppose to be in school, and have to go home to this cluster F'd life.

 

When I had worked the Bx21, a 20 year old man was talking to me and asked me about how he can collect his social security check, which was coming in his brothers name, and about the prices of apartments. We spoke, and I found out his mother died when he was 15, his father (well who knows), and he was suppose to be staying with his older brother, but was now in a room (or boarding house type place). he said he was going to the doctor for psychological reasons, and that is why he wasn't get the checks directly to him. I told him my mother died when I was 19, and I was on my own then (father was around, but never lived with him). I told him things won't be easy and you have to do for you, and only you. Get your credit straight, he did have a job, etc.... He said to me " did you ever feel like just ending it all". I told him "no, and he better not ever get that idea in his head again". I told him we both are young, some people are born without mother or father, and some just will have it harder in life. Everyone can't have it easy. Put his best foot forward, keep working to get that better job, and he will always be broke living by himself, paying for everything, but I've been there, and now 8 years later, things are calming down, and I can see money left in my account. Hanging out with friends, blowing money in bars, clubs, etc..., will be once in a while and most of the time put on the back burners. We have no one else to turn to for money, like some grown men do (still asking mommy for money). We have to be more responsible, and this will make a better man out of him, and he will know what is important in life.

 

That's very true. I've been hearing stories like that around my neighborhood for my entire life. It's one of the reasons that I'm very thankful that I come from the background I was raised in. As I was growing up, I was always well aware that I was far more privileged than most of the other kids who grew up on my block, since I came from a family of two working, married parents who owned their own home. If ever I came to my mother when I was little and complained about something, she'd tell me to just look down the block, and see how many other kids had it as well as I did. Of course, I'd be hard-pressed to find but a few, especially in an area like this. That would shut me up instantly. I was never to complain, because so many people had it worse off than I did.

 

As I grew older, it became more and more difficult for me to associate with the other kids in my neighborhood. It started when I went to a Catholic high school (and most of them went to public), and now that I'm in college, the disconnect is even more pronounced. I don't seem to "fit in" anymore, and they've all noticed that, but it doesn't bother me in the least. Right now, I'm still friends with only one of the boys I knew in junior high, and only five of my former high school classmates - I've lost touch with all the rest, except for a "good morning" at the grocery store.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.