Jump to content
Attention: In order to reply to messages, create topics, have access to other features of the community you must sign up for an account.

Accurate to-scale subway map?


rockdove

Recommended Posts

I've always wanted to see a full subway map drawn geographically to-scale as it really is and not warped to be condensed into a sign. I also would like the subway lines shown on it accurately. It doesn't need to be as detailed as a track map but it should have the tunnels or Els shown more-or-less as they run, not in a jagged connect-the-dots way. Gypsymaps.com is accurate geographically (based on Google maps) but the lines do not seem to be drawn completely correct. If you look closely you'll see what I mean.

 

Anyone possibly have such a map they can share?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I might possibly make one, but it's an enormous undertaking (as I mentioned back in January). Needed are: geographical data, base map for lines to be overlaid on, heavy duty software to work with an enormous file (think on the scale of tens of thousands of pixels squared).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have a paper copy 8 1/2 by 11 somewhere but it only shows the lines (not routes) and no station names or line names. The problem is that the lines in lower Manhattan are so close together that to do one without any exaggeration of lower Manhattan and to show all the station names, the map would have to be rather large.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It should definitely be a street map as well so you can see what intersection a station is at, how the neighborhood is served, and how the line travels above or underground. Showing exits would be nice, but I'd say optional.

 

I wish I could figure out how to save the map in full from gypsymaps.com.. I've tried some map saving utilities but they seem to think I don't know how to copy and paste. I just may piece this one together in Photoshop... the hard way.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It should definitely be a street map as well so you can see what intersection a station is at, how the neighborhood is served, and how the line travels above or underground. Showing exits would be nice, but I'd say optional.

 

I wish I could figure out how to save the map in full from gypsymaps.com.. I've tried some map saving utilities but they seem to think I don't know how to copy and paste. I just may piece this one together in Photoshop... the hard way.

You can't save the map at gypsymaps.com because the map is dynamically generated from data requested from the server. As far as format of the data is concerned, it's a mix of vector graphics (using SVG in Firefox) and bitmaps laid on top of each other, so there is no single image you can save.

 

I would suggest starting the project in Adobe Illustrator as it hasn't given me any trouble yet. OpenOffice.org's Draw application is also good, but only if you can't pay for Adobe's software. In Illustrator, you have layers to work with and you can adjust lines as needed to make needed revisions. In photoshop, you have to erase and redraw for every correction you make.

 

With adobe illustrator, here's the approach I would take:

 

  • Layer for basic geographical information (e.g., green shapes for parks, blue for bodies of water, light yellow for regular land, and white lines for streets). I would take the painstaking job of copying and pasting screenshots of maps from Google, Bing, or Yahoo! and then tracing them, but I'd be much happier if this geographical information were downloadable in a manipulable format (as a collection of points, vectors, and strings) to be converted to a map via a custom-made program. Anything is faster than doing it by hand.

  • Layer for important street names containing only the labels for major corridors. This way, when you export a small bitmap, you won't have any unreadable irrelevant clutter. You may or may not want to take the same approach for the streets.

  • Layer for all the minor street names. All the streets that didn't get names in the previous layer gets a name here in small font. This is for huge bitmap exports.

  • Layer for subway lines. This can be an accurate representation of the tracks on the geography or just abstract lines representing the tunnels and structures used by the subway.

  • Layer for stations. Stations should just consist of semi-transparent rectangles overlaid on top of the lines. If the lines represent tracks, the shapes could possibly represent the platforms instead.

  • Layer for station labels. Give each station a name.

  • Layers for miscellaneous stuff goes above all the other layers.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You can't save the map at gypsymaps.com because the map is dynamically generated from data requested from the server.

 

There's always a way to do these things -- I have the script files saved but I can;t make heads or tails of the code.

 

example: If I could fake my screen resolution to an enormous # of pixels, e.g. 30000 x 30000 and maximize firefox to that size I could view the entire map and just print the screen and paste it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I happen to have an older version of one of those. It still has Flushing Airport.

 

Dude, you should have the MTA license your map...you could make some SERIOUS money! :P

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What about Google maps transit option? That map is way more accurate than I thought it would be. I didn't know that the QBL turned off Queens Blvd onto Broadway, at about Grand Ave., until I saw that overlay. I also learned that most of the system runs directly under a street. Plus, the orientation is right.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yeah Google Maps is pretty accurate. As for Grand Avenue, most of the station is not underneath a street so that is why it has those concrete pillars and curtain walls between the tracks. If you walk down Broadway from Queens Boulevard, and look at down 51 Avenue, Corona Avenue, and Saint James Avenue, note how the vents are in the middle of the block, as opposed to under Broadway.

 

Another interesting example is around Steinway Street. Most maps have the station at Broadway and Steinway Street, however right underneath that intersection, the subway does not run there. The entrance to that station is about 250 feet or so past Broadway, and the northernmost part of the station is about 90 feet or so past the entrance. The station stretches down to between 34 and 35 Avenue underneath Steinway Street. Also, on 41 Street between Broadway and 34 Avenue, you could see the vents as the tunnel starts to curve towards Steinway.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yup. Or how the Ditmars Blvd station doesn't quite reach Ditmars Blvd. We notice the nuances.

It's supposed to curve to the right and run along Ditmars Boulevard to meet up with the (7) at 111 Street before continuing southeast and then curving northeast. :(

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's supposed to curve to the right and run along Ditmars Boulevard to meet up with the (7) at 111 Street before continuing southeast and then curving northeast. :(

 

Interesting... was that originally the plan when the line was built or was it thought of later in the system expansion plans of the 20s - 30s?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

(Post truncated for space)

...With adobe illustrator, here's the approach I would take:

 

  • [*]Layer for basic geographical information (e.g., green shapes for parks, blue for bodies of water, light yellow for regular land, and white lines for streets). I would take the painstaking job of copying and pasting screenshots of maps from Google, Bing, or Yahoo! and then tracing them, but I'd be much happier if this geographical information were downloadable in a manipulable format (as a collection of points, vectors, and strings) to be converted to a map via a custom-made program. Anything is faster than doing it by hand...

 

I've actually followed that process in making my maps. I begun my creating a Google Map quilt of the city and surrounding areas and saving that as a layer to work over. Then I created other layers above it, one for water, one for the borough's land masses, one for streets, one for each trunk line (for easier editing/modifications), one for each railroad, one for symbols and text, and so on.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've actually followed that process in making my maps. I begun my creating a Google Map quilt of the city and surrounding areas and saving that as a layer to work over. Then I created other layers above it, one for water, one for the borough's land masses, one for streets, one for each trunk line (for easier editing/modifications), one for each railroad, one for symbols and text, and so on.

My reason for the approach was to eventually export it to a format that could be used in a custom software program. I export each layer as a single image (or collection of images) containing different details of the map and have the software renderer decide which layers to show based on options selected or the view (much like all the online maps out there).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.


×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.