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Subway questions


Orion VII 4474

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I have 2 questions

 

who decides what train cars go on which line?

 

How are subway lines made?

 

for your first question do you mean which letter/number ((1)(3)(5)(7)(B)(E)(J)(L)(W)) go on which route (7th Avenue, Broadway, Flushing, etc.)

 

Or do you mean which models (R32, R160B, etc.) go on which letter line?

 

How are they made?

By digging tunnels and putting tracks in them...or it could be an elevated line.

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for your first question do you mean which letter/number ((1)(3)(5)(7)(B)(E)(J)(L)(W)) go on which route (7th Avenue, Broadway, Flushing, etc.)

 

Or do you mean which models (R32, R160B, etc.) go on which letter line?

 

How are they made?

By digging tunnels and putting tracks in them...or it could be an elevated line.

 

For question 2 I mean the lines ex:(4)

and for question 1 I mean the model

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I think you mean routes. The lines aren't made, the routes are. Lines: Sea Beach, West End, Lexington, etc.. Route: (N) via Sea Beach, (D) via West End, (4) via Lexington.

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I have 2 questions

 

who decides what train models go on what line?

 

How are subway lines made? Example: 4 train line

 

Well im not exactly sure what person makes the final decision, but usually a new delivery of cars is what shifts certain cars from one yard to another. Example: Jamaica Yard on the Queens Blvd line is assigned with R-46's & R-160's, so trains that terminate at points along the Queens Blvd line get their cars from that yard, which is why you see R-46's on the (F)(G)(R) and R-160's on the (E) and (F). Sometimes rider complaints also contribute to car assignments,there was a point in time during the early 80's where R-44's ran on the (D), however residents along the line started making complaints that the cars were too noisy (due to the fact they were heavier) after a derailment, the cars were pulled from the line. Another example includes how riders on the (E) complained about A/C problems which is why the R-160's went to them 1st instead of the (F). In addition to service changes there are other things that contribute to car assignments. Usually when a new order of cars are delivered it kind of trickles down to other lines (if the new cars aren't directly replacing the older ones)Example: the delivery of the R-160's to the (J)(M)(Z) displacing the R-40M's and R-42's to Jamaica Yard,allowing them to scrap some R-32's. Who make the exact decisions (as to what goes where is probably yard managers).

 

As for your second question how subway lines are made,Im gonna assume your talking about how routes are designed. Some of them go back to the beginning of time( for the subway) others have been changed for riders requests and others are results of projects that cause service changes. The IRT (1)(2)(3)(4)(5)(6)(7) lines have been pretty much the same forever (with the exception of the Brooklyn terminal swap in 1983 and minor changes here and there). Service along this division was a bit more complex in prior the 1960's with express trains serving all lines, the only one I can remember off the top of my head is Express trains from Van Cortlandt Park that operated express south of 96th street,im pretty sure there are more though. The BMT/IND route designs and service history are a bit more complex. Lines and service are modified with operational efficiency and riders in mind. A really good example of this is the Manhattan Bridge/Chrystie Street Connection Projects, however thats alot of information that I would only explain upon request. Hope this helps.

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Actually the bullets are graphical representations of a specific route. The route is the textual name that the symbol is associated with. A route is a specific combination of various lines that service is assigned to.

 

B)

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Actually the bullets are graphical representations of a specific route. The route is the textual name that the symbol is associated with. A route is a specific combination of various lines that service is assigned to.

 

B)

 

Stop it. You're making sense ;)

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Yes, technically (A)(;)(C)(D) etc. in literal terms are ROUTES, but the riding public and transit officials refer to them as lines. The ROUTE of the (D) train uses the Concourse Line..Central Park West Line..6th Ave Line..4th Ave Line..and the West End Line. However, most if not all people still refer to it as the (D)Line. Same can be said for commuter trains, many NJT routes use other lines to get into NY the :me::njc::mbl: are all routed along the :nec: between Secaucus and Newark to get into NY. But they're are still individually called lines. I would assume its more so for simplicity. Plus the (1) LINE sounds a lot better than the (1) ROUTE or Route (1) B)

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