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Low platform vs. High platform


TheKorean

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As a New Yorker I never really get to see many stations that have low platforms. LIRR, all high platforms, MetroNorth all high platforms. NYC doesnt have trams. NJ Transit, I know there are a lot but all major NJ transit stations have high platforms, like Newark Penn or Trenton or Hoboken.

 

What is the advantage of high platforms and low platforms?

 

The ones I thought of so far..

 

High platform-

More convenient to get on the train

Wheel chair accessible

 

Low platform-

Cheaper to build.

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As a New Yorker I never really get to see many stations that have low platforms. LIRR, all high platforms, MetroNorth all high platforms. NYC doesnt have trams. NJ Transit, I know there are a lot but all major NJ transit stations have high platforms, like Newark Penn or Trenton or Hoboken.

 

What is the advantage of high platforms and low platforms?

 

The ones I thought of so far..

 

High platform-

More convenient to get on the train

Wheel chair accessible

 

Low platform-

Cheaper to build.

Low platform-

less space-consuming...this means that the platform can be the sidewalk.

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Are there any low platform stations on MN or LIRR that I dont know about? I am pretty sure there are none for LIRR. I know NJ Transit has few low platform stations. I think Hoboken is low platform.

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(slightly off topic)The MBTA uses mini-high platforms at some Green Line and outlying commuter rail stops. Mini-highs are platforms that are high at one end and low at the rest. They offer the accessibility of a high platform while being cheaper and less space-consuming of one. However, they usually only allow one or two cars of the train to be accessible.

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NJT has more than a "few" low-platform stations. In fact, outside of the NEC and NJCL, most stations are low-level.

 

LIRR: none

MNR: all Waterbury Branch intermediate stops, Merritt-7

SEPTA: most stops

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Almost all Green Line stops on the MBTA are now slightly raised about 10cm above the ground. This allows them to nearly line up with the Type 8 low floor light rail cars. For baby carriages and stepping on the middle doors is done with out any assistance. For wheel chairs, there is a ramp that is deployed via a key on the middle doors. It works quite well.

 

As for the platforms being low, it is cost. If they were high they would need fare control and bridges or pass unders to allow people to switch sides. With low platforms, people can easily cross the tracks to cross sides.

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NJT has more than a "few" low-platform stations. In fact, outside of the NEC and NJCL, most stations are low-level.

 

LIRR: none

MNR: all Waterbury Branch intermediate stops, Merritt-7

SEPTA: most stops

 

Thanks for this info.

 

Well I dont suppose Green Line for MBTA doesnt really need high platforms that Orange, Blue and Red Lines have.

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According to the timetable they are not true flagstops, but in practice, that's what engineers treat them as.

 

They are all 1 door long. Here's a picture of Breakneck Ridge:

 

Breakneck_Ridge_train_station.jpg

 

The little stairs next to the loco is the station.

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Belmont park is the only LIRR station with high platforms. All low platform stations were either closed or renovated by 2000.

 

Doesn't NJT have some mini-highs?

 

And if an entire system either uses mini-highs or has low-loading cars (ie bilevels), low-platforms could be accessible at less cost. Also, high platforms reduce dwell time

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Hoboken terminal has modified low platforms that come up to the bottom of the last step vs the platform being one more step down. The far ends of the platforms out towards the yard are true low platforms as they are around level with the top of the rail.

 

:septa: does not have enough funding to do 100% high platforms. They have wanted to do a rebuild project since genesis, but the money just isn't there, so most stations have low or modified "mid height" platforms, and some have mini-high platforms for ADA compliance at select stations.

 

(NJT) has a few low usage stations as low platforms, one exception is jersey ave, it is busy, but to modify the platform on the NEC side would interfere with the space needed for parking, plus i'm sure there are other reasons.

 

- A

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Belmont park is the only LIRR station with high platforms. All low platform stations were either closed or renovated by 2000.

 

Doesn't NJT have some mini-highs?

 

And if an entire system either uses mini-highs or has low-loading cars (ie bilevels), low-platforms could be accessible at less cost. Also, high platforms reduce dwell time

 

Belmont Park is the only LIRR station with low platforms, but it has a staircase to reach the train.

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According to the timetable they are not true flagstops, but in practice, that's what engineers treat them as.

 

They are all 1 door long. Here's a picture of Breakneck Ridge:

 

Breakneck_Ridge_train_station.jpg

 

The little stairs next to the loco is the station.

 

That station looks like its in the middle of nowhere!

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Belmont Park is the only LIRR station with low platforms, but it has a staircase to reach the train.

 

Thats what I thought because none of the LIRR trains have stairs. Certainly not M7 or M3.

 

Washington Union Station have few low platforms and high platforms. When I arrived they stopped at high platform but departing it was low. It was an odd experience. Same station, different platform. You figure for a train thats heavily used like NE regional trains they would use the high platform.

 

First time I ever used low platform to get on a heavy rail trains. I have used low platform for light rails before. Can low platforms be handicapped accesible?

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Can low platforms be handicapped accesible?

 

Low platforms can be handicapped-accessible, but it usually is not done. To do so, there would be a portable wheelchair lift in the station or on the train. There could also be a one-door long piece of high-level platform accessible by ramp. There have been lawsuits though saying that limiting wheelchair passengers to only one car of a multi-car train is discriminatory. Most ADA-retrofits of existing stations involve full-length high-level platforms.

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So most stations in US are non-handicapped accessible? Interesting...I thought all public facilities were supposed to be accessible by the handicapped.

 

It's a long process called "ADA compliance retrofitting", rail is underfunded, so there are only a few stations being modified or rebuilt at any given time across the entire country. Some systems were built with "high" levels, for example, HBLR is fully ADA compliant, its platforms have both ramps and the height of the platform is level with the light rail vehicle's floors. Other systems were put in place on predicessor property ((NJT), amtk etc etc), and the stations have to be modified, often ruining their historic architectural appearance.

 

- A

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One station that really needs high level platforms - Kingston, RI. You all know it, the railfanner's favorite spot in the United States. Where the Acela Express flies by a foot away from you at 150mph. And the station has low platforms. Stupidest safety violation ever, if your feet are just an inch away from the yellow line, bam! They get chopped off at 150.

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The Newark City Subway ("Newark Light Rail").

 

Newark Penn Station, Broad Street ("Military Park"). Washington Street and Warren Street are examples of classic low level platform underground stations. These four stations and the Raymond Boulevard tunnel opened in 1935.

 

Norfolk Street station begins the topside portion to Grove Street.

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