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Next Stop, the Sign Shop: Workers Toil Around the Clock on New MTA Signage


LRG

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MTA-Signage.jpg

 

They are visual instructions many commuters take for granted.

 

"Late nights A stops here." "B to 145th street." "V to Second Avenue."

 

They are some of the 55,000 signs in the New York City Transit system.

 

Keeping the nation's largest subway system up-to-date is no easy task -- and ever since the MTA announced huge service changes will take effect June 28, artists at the little known "Sign Shop" in Crown Heights, Brooklyn have been working double-shifts get the job done.

 

One of the main tasks: silk-screening new signage for the Sixth Avenue line, where the previously brown M train will become an orange-line train for the first time ever.

 

The best thing about the job?

 

"When you're walkin' through the system you get to see your work up," says Kirk Siee, one of a dozen artists at the Sign Shop.

 

The huge facility -- in an old Brooklyn trolley barn -- is busier than at any time since 9/11, when temporary service changes required some quick new signs.

 

"It's a huge challenge, but we embrace it," says John Montemarano, Director of Station Signs for New York City Transit.

 

He explained that some of the tasks ahead are low-tech -- like placing decals over the soon-to-be-defunct "V" logos.

 

Other projects are bigger, including brand new aluminum signs for much of the Broadway line, where the Q will be extended to Astoria instead of ending at 57th Street.

 

He noted, "If we had to change every sign, we'd have to start three years ago," says Montemarano.

 

The total price tag for new signs, station maps, stickers, decals and other renderings is estimated at $800,000.

 

But it's all worth it if commuters on June 28th have a smooth ride, says Sign Shop superintendent Keith Parker.

 

"These guys are professionals," said Parker. "If June 28th comes and you don't get complaints? That's pride in itself. And an accomplishment."

 

Link: http://www.nbcnewyork.com/news/local-beat/Next-Stop-Sign-Shop-Workers-Toil-Around-the-Clock-On-New-MTA-Signage.html

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Whoa! A dozen workers for the entire system!?

 

A dozen "painters"...guys who put the signs together. I think adding in installers, maintainers, surveyors, administration & such, there's about 40 in the Sign department.

 

People will balk at the $800k price tag, but overall I think the News 4 piece did a good job at describing the vastness of the job. Big job ahead of these guys.

 

Oh, and you know the blogosphere will be waiting for mistakes to appear. No pressure! :confused:

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I wonder if u can buy the sticker signs from this "(MTA) " Sign Store

 

But man thats a lot of work~ And i hate it! I want everything NORMAL!

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I wonder if u can buy the sticker signs from this "(MTA) " Sign Store

 

But man thats a lot of work~ And i hate it! I want everything NORMAL!

 

Goes to show you how much BS these changes are, especially this (M2)/(V) combo...investing money into revitalizing a section of track which won't be used for long as this new pattern won't last long anyway. So the residents of Middle Village and Glendale shouldn't get too comfy with the new pattern.

 

I want those signs :cool:

 

Only you would Zach! B)

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Here is the video link to the story LRG has provided as was shown last night on CH.4/NBC in NYC (6/6/10)Sunday Night 11pm news.

 

http://www.nbcnewyork.com/station/as-seen-on/Inside_the_MTA_s_Sign_Shop_New_York.html

 

 

MTA-Signage.jpg

 

They are visual instructions many commuters take for granted.

 

"Late nights A stops here." "B to 145th street." "V to Second Avenue."

 

They are some of the 55,000 signs in the New York City Transit system.

 

Keeping the nation's largest subway system up-to-date is no easy task -- and ever since the MTA announced huge service changes will take effect June 28, artists at the little known "Sign Shop" in Crown Heights, Brooklyn have been working double-shifts get the job done.

 

One of the main tasks: silk-screening new signage for the Sixth Avenue line, where the previously brown M train will become an orange-line train for the first time ever.

 

The best thing about the job?

 

"When you're walkin' through the system you get to see your work up," says Kirk Siee, one of a dozen artists at the Sign Shop.

 

The huge facility -- in an old Brooklyn trolley barn -- is busier than at any time since 9/11, when temporary service changes required some quick new signs.

 

"It's a huge challenge, but we embrace it," says John Montemarano, Director of Station Signs for New York City Transit.

 

He explained that some of the tasks ahead are low-tech -- like placing decals over the soon-to-be-defunct "V" logos.

 

Other projects are bigger, including brand new aluminum signs for much of the Broadway line, where the Q will be extended to Astoria instead of ending at 57th Street.

 

He noted, "If we had to change every sign, we'd have to start three years ago," says Montemarano.

 

The total price tag for new signs, station maps, stickers, decals and other renderings is estimated at $800,000.

 

But it's all worth it if commuters on June 28th have a smooth ride, says Sign Shop superintendent Keith Parker.

 

"These guys are professionals," said Parker. "If June 28th comes and you don't get complaints? That's pride in itself. And an accomplishment."

 

Link: http://www.nbcnewyork.com/news/local-beat/Next-Stop-Sign-Shop-Workers-Toil-Around-the-Clock-On-New-MTA-Signage.html

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He already posted the link.......................

 

I had problems downloading/playing it, so maybe it something with my computer and reason i added it. Just trying to help LRG guys sorry, nothing more.:):confused:

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The sign shop is very very cool. I've been there before. Also worthy of mention is the fact that it is housed in the same complex as the sheet metal and carpentry shops.

 

The sign shop proper does all of the artistic work - designing and getting graphics approved, and screen printing them. The sheet metal shop constructs the physical sign, then the artists put the stickers on. Not all signs require a metal base though. The rodenticide stickers go directly where they need to, no base required. Yup those are made at Bergen Sign too, as are the "Do Not Lean on Doors" signs in every subway car...

 

The carpentry shop constructs any of the various wooden things you'll see in the system. Most commonly it's cabinets in use in various TA facilities, but they also make other things used in MoW. One of the cooler things they've come up with is a wooden device that looks like a barbell to carry rubber third rail mats that prevents the mat from trying to slide off when walking up or down stairs.

 

The artistic work done in the sign shop is much more difficult, involved, and time consuming that you might think. BTW, worthy of note - notice how every subway sign has a white line near the top? That white line is used by the sign shop to make sure the sign is printed level. I'm sure some have wondered what it's for too, now you know.

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The sign shop is very very cool. I've been there before. Also worthy of mention is the fact that it is housed in the same complex as the sheet metal and carpentry shops.

 

The sign shop proper does all of the artistic work - designing and getting graphics approved, and screen printing them. The sheet metal shop constructs the physical sign, then the artists put the stickers on. Not all signs require a metal base though. The rodenticide stickers go directly where they need to, no base required. Yup those are made at Bergen Sign too, as are the "Do Not Lean on Doors" signs in every subway car...

 

The carpentry shop constructs any of the various wooden things you'll see in the system. Most commonly it's cabinets in use in various TA facilities, but they also make other things used in MoW. One of the cooler things they've come up with is a wooden device that looks like a barbell to carry rubber third rail mats that prevents the mat from trying to slide off when walking up or down stairs.

 

The artistic work done in the sign shop is much more difficult, involved, and time consuming that you might think. BTW, worthy of note - notice how every subway sign has a white line near the top? That white line is used by the sign shop to make sure the sign is printed level. I'm sure some have wondered what it's for too, now you know.

 

Tour? :)

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Co-worker said new signage is in the works for Lawrence-Metrotech and Jay Street once the station connection is opened up.. Something like Burrough Hall-Jay Street & Burrough Hall-Lawrence.. not exactly sure of the wording..

 

It'd be better off to rename both stations to Jay-Lawrence Streets especially since Jay Street is not even that close to Borough Hall anyway.

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The sign shop is very very cool. I've been there before. Also worthy of mention is the fact that it is housed in the same complex as the sheet metal and carpentry shops.

 

The sign shop proper does all of the artistic work - designing and getting graphics approved, and screen printing them. The sheet metal shop constructs the physical sign, then the artists put the stickers on. Not all signs require a metal base though. The rodenticide stickers go directly where they need to, no base required. Yup those are made at Bergen Sign too, as are the "Do Not Lean on Doors" signs in every subway car...

 

The carpentry shop constructs any of the various wooden things you'll see in the system. Most commonly it's cabinets in use in various TA facilities, but they also make other things used in MoW. One of the cooler things they've come up with is a wooden device that looks like a barbell to carry rubber third rail mats that prevents the mat from trying to slide off when walking up or down stairs.

 

The artistic work done in the sign shop is much more difficult, involved, and time consuming that you might think. BTW, worthy of note - notice how every subway sign has a white line near the top? That white line is used by the sign shop to make sure the sign is printed level. I'm sure some have wondered what it's for too, now you know.

 

Do they sell route stickers here and where is this located? THx~

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You & I Should open our own 'TA' Sign Shop :cool:.

 

I'll be glad to help you guys out! :cool:

 

Speaking of signs, anyone knows the company that makes the Mylar rollsigns for the subway cars?

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I'll be glad to help you guys out! :cool:

 

Speaking of signs, anyone knows the company that makes the Mylar rollsigns for the subway cars?

 

Transign, teleweld, and multiscreen have all made rollsigns for NYCT and other transit agencies.

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Do they sell route stickers here and where is this located? THx~

 

They don't sell them. Sign shop is on Bergen Street, between Albany and Troy Aves. It's not open to the public.

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MTA does a good job of saving money when they change money booths to kiosk service booth and later closing the booths. Millions are spent on the change and now the tearing down of the booths. Were they thinking about savings when they were doing this? Similiar to the 800k spending in signs. The public and its employees pays ultimately to some of MTA idiotic ideas. Transit employees should not have to pay the price of layoffs for many of MTA wasteful spendings and mismanagement.

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