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Should there be a fare free day?


checkmatechamp13

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I wrote the following letter to the MTA:

 

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I have written several times regarding proposals to restructure certain bus routes to improve efficiency. This time, however, I want to offer a suggestion on how to make public transportation more attractive.

LYNX in Orlando has an upcoming fare-free day on its bus lines on June 17, 2010. This made me think that if an agency with lower farebox recovery ratios can afford to have this fare-free day, so can the MTA.

My logic is this: For one day, cost-efficiency is improved as the bus and subway lines will be well utilized due to the fact that there is no fare. Also, people may become attracted to public transportation and pay the full fare when the fare is reinstated the next day, causing a growth in the use of mass transportation for the rest of the year. If there are an average of 7,403,524 riders per weekday and 2,306,338,193 riders per year, that would only mean that about 0.35% of the total revenue for the year would be lost, which would be made up by the fact that there would easily be an additional 1% increase in ridership in addition to any ridership increases that would've happened naturally.

At the end of the year, revenues will be up slightly, and the number of cars on the road would decrease that much. Maybe 2 days or even a week would produce even better results.

I would like to ask that you consider a short time period where no fare is charged to boost ridership and revenues for the rest of the year.

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Any thoughts? Would the increased fare from the boost in ridership be enough to offset the decreased revenue from the fare-free day?

 

By the way, the LYNX website for the fare-free day is: http://www.golynx.com/?id=1156369

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I don't think that would be as effective in New York City as it has been in other areas. Other areas are still heavily automobile-dependent and local transit authorities need to advertise and lure customers. In New York City, transit is well-known. Anyone who wants to use it will use it--- they don't need the lure of the free fare.

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We don't need to worry about drawing ridership in New York. Unless you haven't noticed, the majoirty of trips into Manhattan are via MTA services.

 

no "free fare" day is gonna help with anything but dig the MTA's budget hole even deeper.

 

Exactly. I don't think that "reduced holiday fare program" in 2005 helped draw much riders either.

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I don't think that would be as effective in New York City as it has been in other areas. Other areas are still heavily automobile-dependent and local transit authorities need to advertise and lure customers. In New York City, transit is well-known. Anyone who wants to use it will use it--- they don't need the lure of the free fare.

to add on to your point

 

not only well known....

NYC in itself is VERY much mass transit dependent.

 

fare free days works for bee-line, for one, due to the fact that most westchester-ians (what would you call people from westchester, in that regard? you know, like you have "brooklynites"," manhattanites", "staten islanders") that use mass transit, are mainly boarding the Metro-North.....

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If you look at the numbers, they would lose $15 million if this were implemented for 1 day. I guess in the time of route discontinuations, $15 million could save a lot of routes.

I was thinking of areas where the majority of households own cars in more outlying regions like Eastern Queens and Staten Island. I thought maybe this would increase ridership in those neighborhoods, not really in neighborhoods in Manhattan, where everybody takes transit.

Everybody has a point that this wouldn't really increase ridership in an already transit-oriented city.

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Orlando has a fare-free day in order to encourage people to leave their cars home for a day and try the bus. It's a way to encourage future business.

 

On the other hand, New York has a captive audience. It wouldn't be a good business decision for reasons already mentioned.

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That Idea would be fail..financially.Theres already enough people riding mass transit in the city.Only problem is that the (MTA) has bad accountants and spenders.No doubt a free fare day would make things a helluva lot crowded which would strain resources by...

 

-Having to implement more buses on the road increase fuel consumption.

-More trains to ease crowding

-crowded bus and subway stops

-Overtime pay to personel.

 

Also would a free fare day be on a weekday or weekend? which plays an important role in this equation

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I wrote the following letter to the MTA:

 

-------------------------------------------------------------

I have written several times regarding proposals to restructure certain bus routes to improve efficiency. This time, however, I want to offer a suggestion on how to make public transportation more attractive.

LYNX in Orlando has an upcoming fare-free day on its bus lines on June 17, 2010. This made me think that if an agency with lower farebox recovery ratios can afford to have this fare-free day, so can the MTA.

My logic is this: For one day, cost-efficiency is improved as the bus and subway lines will be well utilized due to the fact that there is no fare. Also, people may become attracted to public transportation and pay the full fare when the fare is reinstated the next day, causing a growth in the use of mass transportation for the rest of the year. If there are an average of 7,403,524 riders per weekday and 2,306,338,193 riders per year, that would only mean that about 0.35% of the total revenue for the year would be lost, which would be made up by the fact that there would easily be an additional 1% increase in ridership in addition to any ridership increases that would've happened naturally.

At the end of the year, revenues will be up slightly, and the number of cars on the road would decrease that much. Maybe 2 days or even a week would produce even better results.

I would like to ask that you consider a short time period where no fare is charged to boost ridership and revenues for the rest of the year.

------------------------------------------------------------

 

Any thoughts? Would the increased fare from the boost in ridership be enough to offset the decreased revenue from the fare-free day?

 

By the way, the LYNX website for the fare-free day is: http://www.golynx.com/?id=1156369

 

 

 

Also several other cities across the country such as San Diego also offer 'fare free days' mainly during the Christmas/New Years Holidays.

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We tried the reduced fare scheme when the MTA had a surplus. All the money that could have gone to other things was inherently wasted. Oh sure, everyone had a half-fare. Look where we are now.

 

No fare day, I would like to think again, thank you very much.

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No, it was still a bad idea for the $1 fares back in 2005. That surplus could've gone to fixing up some stations or such. It doesn't look good for a bankrupt agency when they are giving away free/reduced priced rides.

 

BTW, what was their official explanation for that thing? A holiday present?

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And to encourage shoppers to use public transportation

Might be. However, my principal told me that it had something to do with Bloomberg. It's weird considering the election occurred BEFORE the discount. But I can guarantee you, the smell of politics is rather strong here.

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But for now, i don't think a fare free day is the best idea to attract customers. The (MTA) makes about 20M a day & the (MTA) cannot afford to loose that much money. I see why it's not much of a problem for a small transit system but it's a problem for a transit system in a city like NY

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I would go with reduced fare days instead of fare free days NY'ers deserve a break

 

I often say ignorance is bliss some people like to get taken for a ride

 

you'd be lucky to work for someone who has COLA like the UFT because without it you will not survive in NYC there is a misconception among people that when the cost of living go's up ur pay go's up I.E. the MTA and the landlords greedy bastards

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But for now, i don't think a fare free day is the best idea to attract customers. The (MTA) makes about 20M a day & the (MTA) cannot afford to loose that much money. I see why it's not much of a problem for a small transit system but it's a problem for a transit system in a city like NY
No I don't believe that (MTA) has to pull more than that daily with all the tourist that come to New York City how do you think they get around they use the Subway and Buses

 

Monthly passes on tha LIRR & MNR don't come cheap

Bridges & Tunnel are you kidding me cash lanes are always busy

MVM's & TVM'S are used daily and if you pay aboard the train you get slapped with a $5 surcharge talk about highway robbery

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