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Hot back seats on RTS buses


Y2Julio

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I've been riding the B6 recently to get home and I've noticed that the center seat on the very far back row of seats on the RTS buses get very hot. Is there a reason why? Something mechanical underneath them that would cause them to get hot?

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The engine can get very hot sometimes; it's right under the seat.

 

I thought the engine was on the backside of the seats and not underneath it.

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I thought the engine was on the backside of the seats and not underneath it.

 

The engines are underneath those back seats. Notice on the Orion 5s (including the CNGs) the middle seat is missing and has a cover in it's place because it's covering the protruding part of the engine. The Detroit Diesel engines are built like that while the Cummins L10G engines on the Long Island O5 CNGs aren't, and there's a seat located in the middle instead.

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I thought the engine was on the backside of the seats and not underneath it.

 

It 's kind of both. The hottest part of the engine sits right at the center, where the seat is. It get's hot back there all together. The New Flyers can get like that too, but they aren't as bad.

 

The engines are underneath those back seats. Notice on the Orion 5s (including the CNGs) the middle seat is missing and has a cover in it's place because it's covering the protruding part of the engine. The Detroit Diesel engines are built like that while the Cummins L10G engines on the Long Island O5 CNGs aren't, and there's a seat located in the middle instead.

 

The RTS had a T-Drive arrangement, whereas the Orion's and everything else now is set up in a V-Drive arangement. The reason some Orions had no seat in that spot is because the engine is vertical, and they thought it would contain the heat. It's also bigger than the Cummins. Therefore that section is needed.

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I've been riding the B6 recently to get home and I've noticed that the center seat on the very far back row of seats on the RTS buses get very hot. Is there a reason why? Something mechanical underneath them that would cause them to get hot?

 

If I were you, I avoid sitting rear most seats in the RTS bus during Summer. Not unless if there nice looking girl.

 

Typically is very common on RTS and even most buses when you sit at the rear most seats which usually the engine of the bus located below of the seats. They dont shield the hot air off of the engine to protect the passengers and the a/c helps barley except the the cold air from the a/c doesnt aim when you sit on the seats to keep it cold and fresh.

 

The engines are underneath those back seats. Notice on the Orion 5s (including the CNGs) the middle seat is missing and has a cover in it's place because it's covering the protruding part of the engine. The Detroit Diesel engines are built like that

 

No, the DD Series 50 and 50G is a big ass engine, it takes up a lot of space that you see in some buses lose 1 seat. That is a reason why it needs the engine cover to get more additional room and prevent people sitting and noticing from the engine. The RTS however, amazingly fits that big ass engine inside of the RTS rear compartment.

 

while the Cummins L10G engines on the Long Island O5 CNGs aren't, and there's a seat located in the middle instead.

 

That because of the engine size. It is not as big as the DD Series 50G.

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you know those skintight pleather pants women be wearing sometimes....

 

this was a long time ago, but back when the PBL's were still around, I was on a bus where there was a chick that got a hole burned on those shits... you know how women draw more body heat when they sit down anyway.... combined with the heat of those back seats, that was bound to happen.....

 

she had that MILF phatty too ... too bad she was a buttahead though...

---------------------

 

 

but yeah, on the RTS', on some buses (more than others), those seats do get ridiculously hot.... I don't even opt to sit on them when/if that happens during the winter time either.....

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No, the DD Series 50 and 50G is a big ass engine, it takes up a lot of space that you see in some buses lose 1 seat. That is a reason why it needs the engine cover to get more additional room and prevent people sitting and noticing from the engine. The RTS however, amazingly fits that big ass engine inside of the RTS rear compartment.

 

 

 

That because of the engine size. It is not as big as the DD Series 50G.

 

I know, that's what I meant. The Detroit Diesel engine protrudes somewhat and takes up a seat while the Cummins doesn't because of the size difference of the two. I don't have any photos of the interior of the buses but those who know what I'm taking about can draw the image in their head. The next time I'm in Long Island I'll snap a photo of an O5 with the Detroit Diesel (missing middle seat) and one with the Cummins (no missing seats).

 

That's why I sit towards the middle of the RTS buses sometimes.

 

Where I sit depends on the bus type for the most part. If it's a high floor, I'll sit in the front on the side with the flipdot signs (on an O5 I like to lean my head against the window :D). On the low-floors I sit in the high-floor section in the back because it's bouncy, specifically the forward-facing seats.

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I always though it was the transmission that was in the middle seat. I guess I was wrong

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I always though it was the transmission that was in the middle seat. I guess I was wrong

 

You're right. That's where the Trans is mated to the engine on T-Drive (non-RTS) buses.

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It's common on some buses for the rear section seats to be hot to the touch, that's just the engine running hot. More often than not you'll also hear the engine fans going off. RTS's have a V-drive configuration (That even I sometimes wonder how the engine is placed in there) and the rear seems a little more spacious compared to the rear of the Orion V's and VII's housing Detroit Diesel Series 50/50Gs (and have the T-drive thing going along if you've ever seen pictures of the Allison B400's and B500's) which explains why the Orions (except the 1997's/L10Gs) are missing a center seat over the engine. Of all the buses I've been on it's been Long Island's V CNGs that run the hottest - the engine cover and the area behind the seats are usually extremely hot to the touch, and more often than not the engine fans are on full blast. I was on 1523 Monday morning on the way home from work and that bus was HOT- the seats would have burned you if you were wearing any thin clothes and the AC was no help in the rear. The fans were on hardbody and on Hillside Avenue the bus overheated while pulling out of the 179th St stop!

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I know, that's what I meant. The Detroit Diesel engine protrudes somewhat and takes up a seat while the Cummins doesn't because of the size difference of the two. I don't have any photos of the interior of the buses but those who know what I'm taking about can draw the image in their head. The next time I'm in Long Island I'll snap a photo of an O5 with the Detroit Diesel (missing middle seat) and one with the Cummins (no missing seats).

 

 

 

Where I sit depends on the bus type for the most part. If it's a high floor, I'll sit in the front on the side with the flipdot signs (on an O5 I like to lean my head against the window B)). On the low-floors I sit in the high-floor section in the back because it's bouncy, specifically the forward-facing seats.

 

On the flipside, that would depend on the way the Cummins Engine is set up, a Cummins M11E RTS would also produce heat like the Detroit Diesels.

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On the flipside, that would depend on the way the Cummins Engine is set up, a Cummins M11E RTS would also produce heat like the Detroit Diesels.

 

Those get just as hot as the DD50s...imma miss those buses

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I always wondered why that happened, it comes in handy in the Winter but other than that it's nasty, once it was scorching hot and I jumped up. Doesn't really happen as often now, then again I don't really sit in the back anymore (or ride the bus for that matter).

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Those get just as hot as the DD50s...imma miss those buses

 

Isn't there only a handful of them left or an I confusing them with the 9140s that sound like the O5 CNG w/ Cummins in Long Island?

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It 's kind of both. The hottest part of the engine sits right at the center, where the seat is. It get's hot back there all together. The New Flyers can get like that too, but they aren't as bad.

 

 

 

The RTS had a T-Drive arrangement, whereas the Orion's and everything else now is set up in a V-Drive arangement. The reason some Orions had no seat in that spot is because the engine is vertical, and they thought it would contain the heat. It's also bigger than the Cummins. Therefore that section is needed.

 

For the first part, it may also be insufficient coolant in the buses.

 

For the second part, you actually have it reversed. RTSs (and I believe the Flxible Metro when it was made) had a V-drive arrangement, while everything else has a T-drive arrangement.

 

The Detroit Diesel series 50 (8.5 litre) is actually smaller than the L10/ISL (8.9 litre), but runs hotter as a four-cylinder engine as opposed to a six-cylinder Cummins engine.

 

The Detroit Diesel 6V92TA is about the same size as an ISL.

 

Sidenote: why did the series 50 protrude on the back of an Orion bus? Because Orion wants to maximize the interior space of the bus; notice how it is only about 2 feet give or take a few inches from the last window to the end of the bus.

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Isn't there only a handful of them left or an I confusing them with the 9140s that sound like the O5 CNG w/ Cummins in Long Island?

 

We're talking about the same ones the Cummins RTS's are the 9140's...there's only 3 left though

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