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Track Switch Question


LTA1992

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I've always wondered how rails on a switch or junction bend without breaking, can anyone clarify this for me? This has really been a mystery to me for ages.

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There you see

 

Railroad_switch%2C_Grain_elevator_district%2C_Minneapolis.jpg

 

Railroad_switch_animation.gif

 

That red switch slides the switchtrack from the track to the other track which is in the animation. An object in the track allows it to move from Point A to Point B/C.

 

20080202-EMDX_AiguillageAnime.gif

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They don't bend, the points of the switch are mounted so they can move. have you ever even watched a switch move?

 

In the words of KR Accel"Do Not Ask Me Questions". Second, I have seen a switch move, and thats why it was a mystery to me.

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Relax dude hes only 17 years old.

 

Well excuse me for asking a question. Secondly, I do a lot more thinking than a lot of people my age. Trust me.

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Well excuse me for asking a question. Secondly, I do a lot more thinking than a lot of people my age. Trust me.

 

I was replying to the guy who was being tough with you..There was nothing wrong with you asking that question.

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From Wiki and other sources:

A double slip switch (double slip) is a narrow-angled diagonal flat crossing of two lines combined with four pairs of points in such a way as to allow vehicles to change from one straight track to the other, as well as going straight across. A train approaching the arrangement may leave by either of the two tracks on the opposite side of the crossing. To reach the third possible exit, the train must change tracks on the slip and then reverse.

 

The arrangement gives the possibility of setting four routes, but the four blades at each end of the crossing are often connected to move in unison, so the crossing can be worked by just two levers or point motors. This gives the same functionality of two points placed end to end. The additional complexity of this type of switch restricts it to locations where space is limited, such as stations.

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These things must be a nuisance to maintain, because when I suggested connecting J1 at Chambers with J1 at Canal (so you can go straight into the bypass at Canal without having to cross to J4), and placing a double slip switch on the resulting intersection between J1 and J3 (which heads to the stub ended bridge approach with the current J1) for more flexibility, they said they were trying to get out of using double slip switches.

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Real railroads don't really use double-slip switches. The LIRR and MNR use them, but generally only in GCT, Jamaica and NYP. They're irrelevant when talking about railroads though, as they're mostly just glorified rapid transit systems these days.

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Real railroads don't really use double-slip switches. The LIRR and MNR use them, but generally only in GCT, Jamaica and NYP. They're irrelevant when talking about railroads though, as they're mostly just glorified rapid transit systems these days.

 

Pretty much any major railroad passenger terminal uses or used slip switches in locations where space was at a premium, particularly in Europe but also many terminals in the US and Canada. Has nothing to do with RR vs. transit, both types of systems use them only where they have to, but transit more often has confined spaces e.g. tunnels that requires them.

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