Jump to content


Attention: In order to reply to messages, create topics, have access to other features of the community you must sign up for an account.
Sign in to follow this  
lilbluefoxie

Are they getting rid of the Fun Pass (1 day unlimited)?

Recommended Posts

I saw somewhere on some PDF on the MTA site that they are looking to get rid of the 1 day unlimited (The Fun pass) Is this true? Also is the webticket discount going away for LIRR tickets?

 

if these are true, when does this go into effect

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

January 2010 along with the unlimited fare hikes/limits. From a research study, a very small precentage of riders purchase weekly or daily unlimited cards, around 16%. (MTA) plans to raise unlimited cards to $130 or capping $99 unlimiteds to 90 rides a month. Study says those who purchase unlimited cards have around $66,000 yearly income while pay per riders have annual $33,000 income, around double. The differences are dramatic so (MTA) is targeting the ones who can afford and not going after those who can't.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
January 2010 along with the unlimited fare hikes/limits. From a research study, a very small precentage of riders purchase weekly or daily unlimited cards, around 16%. (MTA) plans to raise unlimited cards to $130 or capping $99 unlimiteds to 90 rides a month. Study says those who purchase unlimited cards have around $66,000 yearly income while pay per riders have annual $33,000 income, around double. The differences are dramatic so (MTA) is targeting the ones who can afford and not going after those who can't.

 

So in the long run everyone gets screwed because the poor people dont realise the unlimited while are costly up front they pay for themselves in the long run if you ride the subway and buses a lot

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well the ones with lower income spend less generally on transit because they are aware that they pay $2.25 for each ride and swipe conservatively and do not head out as much. Unlimited riders go all about.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
January 2010 along with the unlimited fare hikes/limits. From a research study, a very small precentage of riders purchase weekly or daily unlimited cards, around 16%. (MTA) plans to raise unlimited cards to $130 or capping $99 unlimiteds to 90 rides a month. Study says those who purchase unlimited cards have around $66,000 yearly income while pay per riders have annual $33,000 income, around double. The differences are dramatic so (MTA) is targeting the ones who can afford and not going after those who can't.

 

1. I think you mean January 2011.

2. It's the 1-Day and the 14-Day cards being eliminated.

3. The 30-Day unlimited card would be $104, not $130.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
So in the long run everyone gets screwed because the poor people dont realise the unlimited while are costly up front they pay for themselves in the long run if you ride the subway and buses a lot

They do, its just they can't afford so much money up front. $100 is a lot of money to some people.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One big problem is that most people don't plan ahead financially. I've never made more than 30,000/year but I realized that taking a $90 hit one a month is going to make my bank account look better down the road, and I don't have to worry if something comes up and I have to go out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
One big problem is that most people don't plan ahead financially. I've never made more than 30,000/year but I realized that taking a $90 hit one a month is going to make my bank account look better down the road, and I don't have to worry if something comes up and I have to go out.

 

Thats why I started buying 10 trip tickets for the city, it seems like a lot, $65 or so up front, (I dont make a lot of money, I work part time in retail at the moment.) but theres savings down the road, its one less expense to worry about later on. While I liked the fun pass because it was easy to use, particularly with going to the city with freinds who arent as familiar wiht the subway, i just told em buy the funpass, you dont ahve to worry then. Ill admit I dont really think I got my moneys worth with those. I'd often only be getting in and out of the system less then the 4 times needed to make it pay for itself. I suppose it'll just require a bit more advanced planning from now on.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is still better than to worry about if the bus or turnstile takes away a fare instead of a transfer. So it is technically 'peice of mind'. For me since I don't go out as often, an unlimited is useless for me, so that's why I stick with pay per ride cards.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A question...why eliminate the 1-Day card? It's still utilized, and it's not like they need to have a special new Metrocard type just for it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Probably because once people use it up, they would just toss it away than to reuse it. It's really good for tourists that have a lot to do in the city, but probably don't use it much for the rest of the week.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Probably because once people use it up, they would just toss it away than to reuse it. It's really good for tourists that have a lot to do in the city, but probably don't use it much for the rest of the week.

 

In that case, the fine for littering should be drastically increased to, say, 25 times the fare.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
January 2010 along with the unlimited fare hikes/limits. From a research study, a very small precentage of riders purchase weekly or daily unlimited cards, around 16%. (MTA) plans to raise unlimited cards to $130 or capping $99 unlimiteds to 90 rides a month. Study says those who purchase unlimited cards have around $66,000 yearly income while pay per riders have annual $33,000 income, around double. The differences are dramatic so (MTA) is targeting the ones who can afford and not going after those who can't.

One thing i think the (MTA) doesn't see though is just because they make more it doesn't mean they can spend more. If one person lives alone and makes 33,000 a year he may have the same amount to spend on transit than a guy that makes 66,000 and has a wife and 3 kids because he has more expenses.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Probably because once people use it up, they would just toss it away than to reuse it. It's really good for tourists that have a lot to do in the city, but probably don't use it much for the rest of the week.

 

I remember when the fun pass cost $4...when it was actually worth something!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
So in the long run everyone gets screwed because the poor people dont realise the unlimited while are costly up front they pay for themselves in the long run if you ride the subway and buses a lot

 

As an LI resident what I hate the most is the shortening of the ticket validity periods to 1 week for one-way and 90 days for 10-trip.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You Know. It's hard. A person is working, honestly, say, for $9.00 per hour, averaging a steady forty hours per week, and it's sometimes not easy to afford $4.50 per day for their trip to and from work let alone afford a seven day MetroCard.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
You Know. It's hard. A person is working, honestly, say, for $9.00 per hour, averaging a steady forty hours per week, and it's sometimes not easy to afford $4.50 per day for their trip to and from work let alone afford a seven day MetroCard.

 

If you're talking about the 1-Day Fun Pass, then it costs much more than $4.50, and is thus useless to to the two-ride-a-day commuter.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
If you're talking about the 1-Day Fun Pass, then it costs much more than $4.50, and is thus useless to to the two-ride-a-day commuter.

 

I think it's more the idea that of the 8 hours they worked that day in gross, more than 2 of them was just to repay the cost of getting there and back, when you consider mandatory taxes for SS and medicare. And that's not just a one time thing, that's every day that week. I've told friends who work in that income just to look for something they can bike or walk to, it'll save $100 a month (which includes that occasional taxi for bad weather/getting out late)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
January 2010 along with the unlimited fare hikes/limits. From a research study, a very small precentage of riders purchase weekly or daily unlimited cards, around 16%. (MTA) plans to raise unlimited cards to $130 or capping $99 unlimiteds to 90 rides a month. Study says those who purchase unlimited cards have around $66,000 yearly income while pay per riders have annual $33,000 income, around double. The differences are dramatic so (MTA) is targeting the ones who can afford and not going after those who can't.

 

 

i wonder where they got those ridiculous #'s about the income of the people with unlimiteds.if anything, i would think it would be reversed, depending on the local..........

i will say that in my experience of working in the booth, i found that more people bought weeklys as opposed to monthlys, i found that that in most low income neighborhoods i worked, you would get a lot of either "add 2.25 to my card", or round trip cards...you would get a few 10 dollar card buyers, but that was like pulling teeth.and in the high income neighborhoods, you would get the 20 dollar,30-40 dollar card buyers............

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As far as the income goes, the median household income is $36,000 for Pay-Per-Ride users, $38,000 for weekly MetroCard users, and $63,000 fo monthly MetroCard users, according to: http://www.mta.info/news/pdf/july10_presentation.pdf (which shows that car drivers are generally wealthier than transit users, as the median income in NYC was about $51,000 in 2008 (http://www.city-data.com/city/New-York-New-York.html) )

 

I would think that the low-income neighborhoods would have more people who don't own cars, and therefore rely on public transportation, so they would be trying to buy the minimum $8 just to get the bonus (if they buy a $4.50 MetroCard, for an extra $3.50, they get 2 extra rides), but I guess they can't afford to pay $8 all at once.

 

By the way, where do they gather the information? Is it a random survey of riders?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.