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Seriously, Do Not Walk Between Cars on a Moving Subway Train


TrainFanatic

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Arabell Lin, 25, was attempting to switch subway cars on the N line when she slipped and fell down to the tracks back in March. (The Post reports that Lin had a prosthetic right leg, but it was impossible to know whether this was part of the cause of the accident that killed her.) Her fall properly triggered an emergency brake, and the operator of the train took seven minutes to walk up and down to see what was the matter. But when the operator didn't see anything, he or she resumed the trip, running over Lin's body with the remaining six cars of the train. Then ten more trains ran over her.

 

Honestly, people, do not walk between the cars on a moving train. No matter how many legs you have.

 

The article, including the victim's photo can be seen here: http://nymag.com/daily/intel/2010/08/seriously_do_not_walk_between.html

 

My opinion: Sad, sad indeed :P. But why would she even want to attempt to walk between cars, especially with a prosthetic leg?!

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i heard the train operator is getting in trouble for not properly checking when the brake went off..

 

Do train operators carry flashlights? If so, they should be able to see a body.

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Do train operators carry flashlights? If so, they should be able to see a body.

 

They are supposed to, usually something as small as a maglite:

 

2-cell-mag-lite.jpg

 

They take up less space than a standard flashlight but the light is extremely strong. My T/O friend carries one in a holster fixed to his belt, similar to this:

 

Belt_holster_mini_maglite_20050614.jpg

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They are supposed to, usually something as small as a maglite:

 

They take up less space than a standard flashlight but the light is extremely strong. My T/O friend carries one in a holster fixed to his belt, similar to this:

 

I see, I still wondered how the train operator didn't see the body then if the flashlight is strong. It should stick out since the body would be blood red after it.

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I see, I still wondered how the train operator didn't see the body then if the flashlight is strong. It should stick out since the body would be blood red after it.

 

2 reasons. 1) Because the train operator did not spend the proper amount of time inspecting around and a safe distance behind his train, and 2) because a mutilated body that has been run over by a train bears little resemblance at all to a human body.

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*Shakes my head*

 

To be honest, I don't really feel bad for people like this. It's dangerous to walk across, I don't give a shit who you are, and you know its illegal but you still do it. Maybe if she was patient enough, this would have never happened. The T/O had a part in this, but still, NEVER WALK across doors. The MTA should have the doors look, unless the train crews unlock it or the emergency brakes are activated

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*Shakes my head*

 

To be honest, I don't really feel bad for people like this. It's dangerous to walk across, I don't give a shit who you are, and you know its illegal but you still do it. Maybe if she was patient enough, this would have never happened. The T/O had a part in this, but still, NEVER WALK across doors. The MTA should have the doors look, unless the train crews unlock it or the emergency brakes are activated

 

Yes, they should be locked. But then again, who's gonna go through all those cars and unlock all of them with a key on the 60 footers?

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Only morons fall when walking between cars. Why would a person already with a prostetic leg think they can handle walking through a moving train? MORON!

 

I dont think we lost any astrophysicist here :(

 

Im 33 and I have been walking through trains for years, seriously you have to be a pea brained a moron if you cant handle that.

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You know I read something up on door restrictors. This is what they do. First they are attached to the door and the door can't be open more then several inches even with human hands. They can be opened when the T/O presses a button in the control cab. It's in use throughout the world on elevators and can be controlled using a computer system. The (MTA) should incorporate this system on all cars.

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Do train operators carry flashlights? If so, they should be able to see a body.

 

No - we send them into the dark tunnels without a flashlight.:confused:

 

 

They are supposed to, usually something as small as a maglite:

 

They take up less space than a standard flashlight but the light is extremely strong. My T/O friend carries one in a holster fixed to his belt,

 

Of course they have a flashlight - and it isn't a MagLite.

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Anyway if a person like her fell through the crack on a train moving at 55 mph and weighing several tons. Yeah I doubt its survivable. I read how motorcycle drivers crash at 55 mph and they didn't even make it their whole face came off. This is equivalent to a high speed motorcycle crash followed by a car rolling on top of you. You can't survive that. You can't even survive the crash.

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Every T/O has an RTO issued flashlight, however many of them carry their own personal backup flashlight just in case their flashlight runs out of battery. I have a friend who has been down there a good many years, and he told me a story once. He had that info about carrying a backup flashlight passed along to him early on in his career and it may have saved his life. His flashlight battery died walking a tunnel, and it was VERY dark in the particular tunnel where he was. He took a couple of steps, feeling around carefully, then remembered he'd brought his backup flashlight. He turned it on, and sure enough saw the third rail a few feet directly in front of him. Having a second light may have saved his life.

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