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LIRR fire knocks out all but one line on Long Island Railroad system


Harry

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Brace for commuting chaos.

 

A fire in a switching tower Monday knocked out service on all but one branch of the Long Island Rail Road, leaving thousands of riders stranded on trains and at the stations.

 

With rain adding to the misery, railroad officials were scrambling to come up with a plan to get back on track in time for the evening rush when about 100,000 daily LIRR riders will try to get home.

 

Currently, only the Port Washington Branch is operating.

 

Read more: http://www.nydailynews.com/ny_local/2010/08/23/2010-08-23_long_island_railroad_fire_snarls_all_but_one_line_as_rush_hour_nears.html#ixzz0xSeOthBl

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Fire destroys everything. If the fire is gone in the switch tower east of Jamaica, will the switch work or what the MTA is gonna go. Are there injuries? I hope not.

MTA Service Notice

 

Hempstead Branch Customers:

 

 

 

The LIRR is offering limited service for the PM rush hour today.

 

 

 

Hempstead Branch customers must pick up their train at Atlantic Terminal in Brooklyn.

 

No Hempstead trains will leave from Penn.

 

 

 

Shortly before 11 AM today, Long Island Rail Road service was suspended on all branches, with the exception of the Port Washington Branch, as a result of a fire in the LIRR’s switching tower located on the east side of Jamaica.

 

This is what happens 8/23/2010 4:10pm. I used Hempstead as an example.

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I've been following this since 11 a.m and posting updates on Facebook! LIRR has been a mess since the past week. They have been having Switch and Equipment problems prior to this since last week. My phone has been blowing up with text alerts.

 

The West Hempsted Branch will be run by buses.

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The LIRR is offering limited service for the PM rush hour today due to an earlier fire at a switching station east of Jamaica. West Hempstead Branch customers must get a train to Valley Stream where buses will operate on the West Hempstead Branch.

 

From MTA site, West Hempstead Branch section under Rail.

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Don't forget that the rest of the systems will be stressed as well. The derated service will cause more crowding on the regular buses and subways.

 

It might to point that displaced LIRR riders will ride the (E) train in which people may have to sit on the roof of trains.(joking of course)but making point.:eek:

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So please can someone explain how can the very heavy rains can cause a fire that screwed up the wires and basically the entire LIRR network?:eek:

 

It's in the press statement that Mark mentioned as a probable cause.

 

The only explanation I can think up for how the rain started the fire is this: Water from the rain must have somehow gotten into the electrical system of the control tower at a point where insulation/rain protection was faulty. Once that happens you have an almost guaranteed electrical fire. As to how this managed to FUBAR everything except for Port Washington, that is pretty straightforward. If you look at the LIRR route map and check out the station area you will see that there is a maze of interlockings on each side of the station and every LIRR line except the Port Washington Branch goes through those interlockings. Jamaica Station also houses the control tower that, unless I am wrong, sets the switches and clears the signals for each individual train entering and leaving the station as well as (i believe) acting as the primary control tower for much of the LIRR east of Jamaica. If that goes down, then trains are unable to move beyond the next unset interlock because there is no way to set it for them. What blows me away is that Jamaica doesn't have a secondary or tertiary control tower capable of taking over if something like this happened. I agree with the others on this forum, it is about time LIRR got some major infrastructure upgrades.

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it is about time LIRR got some major infrastructure upgrades.

 

Do tell me how a solid state computerized interlocking is going to make anything "better"? The current Model 14 machine in HALL is a damn good piece of equipment. You put a high-current 750V conductor into any device designed to handle much less voltage and the shit is going to hit the fan.

 

The only thing that is "better" about a video game interlocking machine is the fact that the railroad can then try to abolish the towerman position in that tower. Do you really want trains routed by computer? Would you rather have levers physically interlocked by relay or would you rather have a few -unknown- pieces of software ensuring a switch doesn't get thrown under a train?

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Do tell me how a solid state computerized interlocking is going to make anything "better"? The current Model 14 machine in HALL is a damn good piece of equipment. You put a high-current 750V conductor into any device designed to handle much less voltage and the shit is going to hit the fan.

 

The only thing that is "better" about a video game interlocking machine is the fact that the railroad can then try to abolish the towerman position in that tower. Do you really want trains routed by computer? Would you rather have levers physically interlocked by relay or would you rather have a few -unknown- pieces of software ensuring a switch doesn't get thrown under a train?

 

I'm not impugning the integrity of physical relays, nor do I want a computer routing trains unsupervised because our favorite transit agency decides to cut payrolls. I do not particularly care which system is used so long as it is well maintained and the people operating it are well-trained. When I spoke of major infrastructure upgrades I was not specifically talking about installing a solid-state system. Rather, I was talking about having some form of redundancy, i.e. a second or third Model 14 in a separate building at Jamaica and smaller systems for individual branches as well as better electrical and environmental protection for the existing machines so that 750V high-amperage current does not wind up in the interlocking machine. Had that been available and maintained, the incident might have caused a short suspension of service in the area around Jamaica while the second machine was brought online while regional control towers maintained relatively consistent service farther out on the branch lines.

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