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Mini Heat Wave to end August 2010 one of hottest in NYC ever


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Guys after a few weeks of 'normal' August weather in Metro NYC, another mini heat wave is coming for end of this weekend/early next week. From Sunday 8/29/10-Tuesday 8/31/10 temps in Central Park is expected to be at least 90 degrees for 3 straight days.

http://www.weather.com/weather/tenday/USNY0998

 

 

So guys your reactions as we are almost about to putting a 'wrap' to summer 2010? :confused: The Highlights which included the 2nd hottest July in NYC on record and also much of the US and even our planet's warmest year ever?:

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Guys after a few weeks of 'normal' August weather in Metro NYC, another mini heat wave is coming for end of this weekend/early next week. From Sunday 8/29/10-Tuesday 8/31/10 temps in Central Park is expected to be at least 90 degrees for 3 straight days.

 

 

 

So guys your reactions as almost are putting a 'wrap' to summer 2010, which included the 2nd hottest July in NYC on record and also much of the US and even planet's warmest year ever?:confused:

 

My only reaction is that this is mild compared to what's probably coming up in the next decade or two.:eek:

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Well it's been cloudy for FOUR Days straight (not today though) so it's a pleasant change.

 

Plus I love heat.

 

Now how about that Hurricane Danielle, it has a chance of striking the Mid-Atlantic (NC-NY).

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Yeah if you study Meteorology then you would know that a Bermuda High located on top of Bermuda rotating clockwise deflects most hurricanes from hitting the eastern seaboard. The Bermuda High has a negative effect though, because of it's rotation it brings warm humid air from the Gulf and the Atlantic and sends it up creating heat waves. Sometimes the Bermuda High for some reason ends up in Greenland and even though it's rare only those times do hurricanes threaten the East Coast. It happened in 1938.

 

The Great New England Hurricane of 1938

Without warning, a powerful Category 3 hurricane slams into Long Island, New York and southern New England, causing 600 deaths and devastating coastal cities and towns. Also called the Long Island Express, the Great New England Hurricane of 1938 was the most destructive storm to strike the region in the 20th century.

 

The officially unnamed hurricane was born out a tropical cyclone that developed in the eastern Atlantic on September 10, 1938, near the Cape Verde Islands. Six days later, the captain of a Brazilian freighter sighted the storm northeast of Puerto Rico and radioed a warning to the U.S. Weather Bureau (now the National Weather Service). It was expected that the storm would make landfall in south Florida, and hurricane-experienced coastal citizens stocked up on supplies and boarded up their homes. On September 19, however, the storm suddenly changed direction and began moving north, parallel to the eastern seaboard.

 

Charlie Pierce, a junior forecaster in the U.S. Weather Bureau, was sure that the hurricane was heading for the Northeast, but the chief forecaster overruled him. It had been well over a century since New England had been hit by a substantial hurricane, and few believed it could happen again. Hurricanes rarely persist after encountering the cold waters of the North Atlantic. However, this hurricane was moving north at an unusually rapid pace--more than 60 mph--and was following a track over the warm waters of the Gulf Stream.

 

With Europe on the brink of war over the worsening Sudetenland crisis, little media attention was given to the powerful hurricane at sea. There was no advanced meteorological technology, such as radar, radio buoys, or satellite imagery, to warn of the hurricane's approach. By the time the U.S. Weather Bureau learned that the Category 3 storm was on a collision course with Long Island on the afternoon of September 21, it was too late for a warning.

 

Along the south shore of Long Island, the sky began to darken and the wind picked up. Fishermen and boaters were at sea, and summer residents enjoying the end of the season were in their beachfront homes. Around 2:30 p.m., the full force of the hurricane made landfall, unfortunately around high tide. Surges of ocean water and waves 40 feet tall swallowed up coastal homes. At Westhampton, which lay directly in the path of the storm, 150 beach homes were destroyed, about a third of which were pulled into the swelling ocean. Winds exceeded 100 mph. Inland, people were drowned in flooding, killed by uprooted trees and falling debris, and electrocuted by downed electrical lines.

 

At 4 p.m., the center of the hurricane crossed the Long Island Sound and reached Connecticut. Rivers swollen by a week of steady rain spilled over and washed away roadways. In New London, a short circuit in a flooded building started a fire that was fanned by the 100 mph winds into an inferno. Much of the business district was consumed.

 

The hurricane gained intensity as it passed into Rhode Island. Winds in excess of 120 mph caused a storm surge of 12 to 15 feet in Narragansett Bay, destroying coastal homes and entire fleets of boats at yacht clubs and marinas. The waters of the bay surged into Providence harbor around 5 p.m., rapidly submerging the downtown area of Rhode Island's capital under more than 13 feet of water. Many people were swept away.

 

The hurricane then raced northward across Massachusetts, gaining speed again and causing great flooding. In Milton, south of Boston, the Blue Hill Observatory recorded one of the highest wind gusts in history, an astounding 186 mph. Boston was hit hard, and "Old Ironsides"--the historic ship U.S.S. Constitution--was torn from its moorings in Boston Navy Yard and suffered slight damage. Hundreds of other ships were not so lucky.

 

The hurricane lost intensity as it passed over northern New England, but by the time the storm reached Canada around 11 p.m. it was still powerful enough to cause widespread damage. The Great New England Hurricane finally dissipated over Canada that night.

 

All told, 700 people were killed by the hurricane, 600 of them in Long Island and southern New England. Some 700 people were injured. Nearly 9,000 homes and buildings were destroyed, and 15,000 damaged. Nearly 3,000 ships were sunk or wrecked. Power lines were downed across the region, causing widespread blackouts. Innumerable trees were felled, and 12 new inlets were created on Long Island. Railroads were destroyed and farms were obliterated. Total damages were $306 million, which equals $18 billion in today's dollars.

 

http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/the-great-new-england-hurricane

 

To tell you people the truth New York was mostly spared by the Hurricane. We only got hit by the rain bands not the eye wall. New York had wind speeds of 75 mph. Long Island and New England got hit by the eye wall and felt wind speeds of 130 mph. We might not get so lucky next time New York is overdue for a hurricane. The next one would hit us directly with estimated wind speeds of 130 mph. The Verrazano Narrows Bridge would shut down first even before during the Hurricane hits along with the other bridges to head out of down because of their height they would feel hurricane wind speeds first. The only way to leave would be by train. Airports would shut down because of the wind speed too. Since all of Manhattan's skyscrapers including the Empire State Building is design to withstand a hurricane they would survive. The houses are not so lucky. If the houses are protected they would survive but most houses won't anyway because of the 40ft storm surge that would roll in like a tsunami flooding our subway and destroying all houses. Leaving Brooklyn, Lower Manhattan, Queens, and Staten Island like New Orleans after Katrina. The Bronx is spared the surge and so is Midtown and Upper Manhattan but every subway tunnel and stations are flooded. The trees would be striped of their leaves and fallen over on houses causing more damage. In Bronx there wouldn't be houses left even though they were spared from the hurricane. Bridges are damaged and they are out. Etc.

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^^^That's like a Cat. 3/4/5 destruction.

 

I had the pleasure of being on the GWB literally right after they closed it (light turned red right before we got on too), not fun at all. The front of the car was being lifted up, it felt like the bridge was sagging. One of the scariest things in my life. This was during that TS/Cat. 1 strength Nor'Easter in March/April.

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Enough with the Hurricane talk, all we will ever get here is a tropical storm, no more, no less, no back on topic it's going to be 92F on Sunday.....:confused:

 

I remember Hurricane Gloria in 1985 and although NYC was spared, Long Island and the NJ shore got slammed with heavy rains and flooding from tropical storm.

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Enough with the Hurricane talk, all we will ever get here is a tropical storm, no more, no less, no back on topic it's going to be 92F on Sunday.....:confused:

 

I'm sure that was the sentiment before the 1938 hurricane.

 

New Orleans also probably.

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September is usually the killer month during a hot but quiet tropical storm season.

 

I will not be surprised if we get a totally frozen winter with very little snow, just lots of cold, like dangerous cold.

 

Edit: This is the hottest summer so far ever recorded, both in number of days above certain temperatures, overnight highs, and absolute highs for most of north america. There were a few days where it was in the 90's overnight and up over 100 the next day 3-4 days in a row.

 

- A

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