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Hurricane Earl. Could this be our turn next.


St Louis Car 09

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I know its kinda early to tell,but according to weather experts tracking Hurricane earl,He has his sights on the Northeast and pretty close to the NYC area by this weekend.If it arrives or come close enough to cause trouble,how are you prepared or preparing for this storm?He is currently at 125MPH moving WNW at 15MPH at 955mb(Millibars).Over the northern region of the carribean.

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I know its kinda early to tell,but according to weather experts tracking Hurricane earl,He has his sights on the Northeast and pretty close to the NYC area by this weekend.If it arrives or come close enough to cause trouble,how are you prepared or preparing for this storm?He is currently at 125MPH moving WNW at 15MPH at 955mb(Millibars).Over the northern region of the carribean.

 

 

One thing based on the map St Louie has posted, it looks for certain it won't be until about Wed. 9/1 before we know for sure if the Northeast/Mid-Atlantic US will get this storm. Or stay out in the ocean and maybe hit Bermuda instead.:confused:

 

This is not the news what those business at beach/vacation spots in our region don't want on the unoffical end to the summer season on a major holiday weekend.

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I will stay at home and watch the play by play on the weather channel. If we tolerated the heat waves that we had this summer this will be a piece of cake, what is the worst that can happen besides a blackout? :cool:

 

I would only evacuate if it was mandatory but I don't think that will be the case. People living on Long Island and on the shores have more to worry about then I do. Where I live in Queens it's about 15 miles away from the beaches. Fear of the wind yes but not floods since I live on top of a small hill.

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I will stay at home and watch the play by play on the weather channel. If we tolerated the heat waves that we had this summer this will be a piece of cake, what is the worst that can happen besides a blackout? :cool:

 

I would only evacuate if it was mandatory but I don't think that will be the case. People living on Long Island and on the shores have more to worry about then I do. Where I live in Queens it's about 15 miles away from the beaches. Fear of the wind yes but not floods since I live on top of a small hill.

 

I really hate it when someone asks that question. Almost every time its asked the worst usually DOES happen :o

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There's gonna be effects regardless. On The Weather Channel they said if it stays on the western side of the cone/path it'll be a historic event but if it stays on the east side of tw cone/path there will be high waves and stuff.

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Heres news off Wall St:

 

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Wind, waves and rain from Hurricane Earl could threaten New York area beaches this Labor Day weekend, sending vacationers home early and prompting some officials to ready evacuation plans in case of storm-related flooding.

 

Trackers project the strengthening storm with 135-mph winds, will steam northward, reaching North Carolina by midweek. The National Hurricane Center predicts a 20% to 30% probability that Hurricane Earl will bring winds with at least the intensity of a tropical storm to Greater New York by late Friday or early Saturday. The much-stronger eye of the storm is projected to stay off the East Coast.

 

The hurricane, which had intensified to a Category 4 storm, comes on the heels of Hurricane Danielle, which caused rough waters, riptides and red flags along a number of shorelines this past weekend in New York and New Jersey. But with plenty of sun and dry weather, beachgoers still flocked to the oceanfront.

 

Hurricane Earl will come "a lot closer to the coast than Danielle" and will almost certainly bring "high tides, rough surf and significant rip currents" along Long Island and the Jersey Shore, said Dennis Feltgen, a National Hurricane Center spokesman. "Anybody living on the East Coast of the United States should really be paying attention to this storm," he said.

 

A number of people already have. Joan Gelman, a New York City resident and television producer and writer, said she'd be cutting her time in the Hamptons short because of the weather.

 

"It's going to wreck Labor Day," said Ms. Gelman, who has property in Bridgehampton. Asked whether her friends were thinking of leaving early, too, she said, "Yes, I'm definitely hearing the rumblings."

 

Joe Gomulka, captain of the Seaside Park Beach lifeguards in New Jersey, said he's already assuming that he'll have to close much of the beach this weekend. "Honestly, I think the week is already over," he joked.

 

Preparedness experts are urging shoreline homeowners in New Jersey, Connecticut and Long Island to be ready for both the wind and the possibility of flooding from storm surges that can accompany hurricanes. Among their suggestions: Keep contact information for your insurance agent in a safe place alongside your policies and other vital records. Clear debris from gutters, remove objects such as deck chairs that could be thrown by high winds, trim dead branches from trees and anchor fuel tanks and other heavy objects that may float away.

 

Officials in New Jersey were also preparing for flooding. Frank McCall, director of the Cape May County, N.J., emergency management communication center, said if predictions for Hurricane Earl hold, his office would ask people living in the county's low-lying areas to evacuate for the first time since 1985.

 

"We don't sound the alarm too often, so people here know we're being serious if we ask them to move," he said.

 

 

SOURCE: Wall St Journal

 

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748704323704575462180723393958.html?mod=googlenews_wsj

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Even if Earl misses; the east coast is long overdue for a Major Hurricane. Trust and believe one has our name on sooner or later. it

 

Every 75 years a major hurricane hits the NY area, its around 75 years now that we havent had one, last big one to hit was the Long Island Express, back then they didnt have a naming system for hurricanes. But I got a gut feeling this "Earl" may be the big or almost big one......If the High pressure system leans more out to sea, the more Earl will go out to sea, the more the high goes more inland, the more the hurricane comes inland, but a Category 2 Hurricane can wipe Manhattan off the map, thats if the eye wall were to have a direct impact into NY Harbor.

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Category 2 Hurricane can wipe Manhattan off the map, thats if the eye wall were to have a direct impact into NY Harbor.

 

I won't say off the map cause some of the newer building can withstand Hurricane winds,The problem is downtown, specially ground zero could be the most hit since that section use to part of the Huston River.

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Bad News. Looks like the Northeast/Mid Atlantic although not directly hit by Earl is now predicted to get Cat. 1 winds/rains(over 75 MPH)on Friday/Saturday and thus ruin Labor Day weekend.

 

http://WWW.weather.com

 

not mine. I'll be down south for the weekend. :cool: R32 3348 better have some storm shots for me when I get back. That's all I can say.

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