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Some Subway Stations feel like Ovens.


Broadway Local

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When I was going to staples, I took the (R) to Bay Ridge-95th Street Station and it is so hot, that I sweat in less than 1 minute. That station is a toaster oven. Also when I took the (N) train via the (D) to 36th Street, man, it is hot in that station too like a microwave oven while I was waiting for the (R) to Bay Ridge-95th Street, even when it is winter. If you are in a subway station that is a toaster oven, reply what station you are in?

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The (MTA) should Air Condition all the subway stations. They should start on the Sixth Avenue Line.

 

That is the worst idea ever, do you know how much it would cost to do that? Even if the system was free, it would cost too much to run.

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Because it's built from scratch, that's why they can have climate control. The GC-42nd St station on the Lexington Av lines cost a few mil and doesn't really do a good job. Throwing money around isn't going to change much. You just have to put up with it like ppl have for decades.

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Wirelessly posted via (Mozilla/5.0 (Linux; U; Android 1.6; en-us; T-Mobile G1 Build/DMD64) AppleWebKit/528.5+ (KHTML, like Gecko) Version/3.1.2 Mobile Safari/525.20.1)

 

The only 2 stations that have AC (that I know of) is Grand Central on the (4)(5)(6) & South Ferry on the (1)

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The (MTA) should Air Condition all the subway stations. They should start on the Sixth Avenue Line.

 

Can't. A/C condensers generate hot air. It's a fact of how an A/C unit works. Your home unit does it, the one at the doctor's office does it, and every unit on a subway car also does it. Can't air condition the stations because that hot air needs somewhere to go. The station A/C (trying to cool) will also constantly be fighting with the train A/C (dumping hot air in stations after cooling trains) which is an inefficient use of energy and resources.

 

Not only that, but the subway system is not enclosed which is necessary to air condition anything. Vents provide street ventilation, tunnels open at portals, and many stations are elevated also. The reason the vents exist is to allow hot air to rise out of the stations. They also serve to ventilate the stations so that fresh air can cycle in and out. There are also ventilation shafts throughout the city which release REALLY hot air high into the city where it won't affect people on the street.

 

Asking for anything more than what already is just wastes a lot of money with little to no benefit. Grand Central (4)(5)(6) is "air conditioned". Stand on that platform 10 feet from the A/C unit and see if it does anything. Go down there on a 100 degree day and I'll bet you're still sweating bullets.

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Can't. A/C condensers generate hot air. It's a fact of how an A/C unit works. Your home unit does it, the one at the doctor's office does it, and every unit on a subway car also does it. Can't air condition the stations because that hot air needs somewhere to go. The station A/C (trying to cool) will also constantly be fighting with the train A/C (dumping hot air in stations after cooling trains) which is an inefficient use of energy and resources.

 

Not only that, but the subway system is not enclosed which is necessary to air condition anything. Vents provide street ventilation, tunnels open at portals, and many stations are elevated also. The reason the vents exist is to allow hot air to rise out of the stations. They also serve to ventilate the stations so that fresh air can cycle in and out. There are also ventilation shafts throughout the city which release REALLY hot air high into the city where it won't affect people on the street.

What they need then, is to have fans in the vents to suck the hot air out In the stations). Especially when it has cooled outside, and the heat is still trapped underground.
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