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The Rockaway Line runs on former LIRR trackage?


Joel Up Front

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Not that abandoned one, the one the A train runs on...

 

I was surprised to read that part of the (A) runs on what was LIRR trackage.... I know the MTA loves using third rail, but I thought it was impossible to run commuter rail cars on subway tracks because of differences in electric voltage.

 

But I read that an R44 almost hit 80 MPH on the Main Line of the LIRR and only couldn't go any faster because they ran out of room - this shocked me still!

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Yes. The IND Rockaway Line used to be operated by the LIRR. Modifications were made to prepare it for subway service.

 

Here's an oversimplified timeline of the line:

 

1880-1921: Line opens in a much longer configuration than what remains today, from Rego Park to the Rockaways. Today only a fraction of the original route is used in subway service. The ownership of this original line was very complex, culminating in the LIRR operating this line beginning in 1921.

 

1950: A fire occurs on the trestle across Jamaica Bay, hurting the LIRR’s ability to run service. The LIRR no longer wanted to run the line, seeing it as unprofitable. The city purchased the southern portion of the line, from Ozone Park to the Rockaways, in 1955, intending to connect it to the IND and run trains over Jamaica Bay to the Rockaways.

 

1956: The city debuts the southern part of the line purchased in 1955 as the IND Rockaway Line, as a part of the subway system. Connection is made to the IND Fulton Line at Rockaway Blvd. Today, “A” trains use this connection to serve the Rockaways. The portion of the original line north of Ozone Park (originating from Rego Park) was never connected to subway service, and the LIRR continued to operate trains over it.

 

1962: The LIRR decides that the service from Rego Park to Ozone Park is not particularly profitable, particularly because no connection or transfer exists to the subway at Ozone Park. Therefore, service over this portion of the route is discontinued and the line was left alone and allowed to fall into disrepair. To this day, it has not been officially abandoned nor has any of the track along the northern section of the line been removed. The portion south of Ozone Park remains in service and is used by “A” and Rockaway Shuttle trains.

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Wirelessly posted via (Mozilla/5.0 (Linux; U; Android 1.6; en-us; T-Mobile G1 Build/DMD64) AppleWebKit/528.5+ (KHTML, like Gecko) Version/3.1.2 Mobile Safari/525.20.1)

 

So the subway just modified the stations, and not the trains themselves?

 

Most likely, its the same stations but modified

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If you ride the (A) train to the Rockaways you will see that Aqueduct North Conduit still has the original cement walls from when it was a LIRR station. As kids we used to walk the abandoned tracks starting from Rego Park all the way through rockaway Blvd.. Now alot of the tracks are gone. They sold most of the land to apartment buildings and businesses. The tracks that still remain are the tracks that are between Myrtle Ave and run all the way down to Atlantic Ave. Then there is a few blocks where a school bus company removed the tracks and parks the buses up on the old tressle. Then from 95th ave to rockaway blvd there are still old tracks left above the tressle.

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They were designed with a high speed operating mode for the planed QB bypass route. the high speed mode was taken out unused.

 

No, they were designed for the Second Av Subway which would have had ATO.

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The Brighton line also ran next to LIRR tracks.

THe Dyre ave line was a closed railroad.

And there is a sparsely used LIRR track next to the N line along 60 st.

A part of the Brighton line was actually former LIRR trackage (not next to it as you said).

The LIRR trackage besides the Sea Beach line was the Bay Ridge branch, and formerly connected to both the Brighton and Atlantic Avenue branches. There is only one track, but you can see that 3 or 4 tracks could easily fit in the right of way.

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Of course I know the LIRR trackage by the Sea Beach Line. It has a name it's called the Bay Ridge Branch. They use it for freight nowadays. Back in the 1900's it had passenger service, but there wasn't demand for a crosstown Brooklyn Line. So it became a freight line. Nowadays the trackage is being proposed for passenger service on the Triboro RX line. Also has anyone have any proposals or use for the remaining Rockaway Beach Branch. There is an unused section and I am wondering if the (MTA) is ever going to convert it into a subway line. Also the abandoned trackage near the Brighton Line is the LIRR Manhattan Beach Branch. It also was a crosstown Brooklyn line in the 1900's nowadays it has no plans of usage either.

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Of course I know the LIRR trackage by the Sea Beach Line. It has a name it's called the Bay Ridge Branch. They use it for freight nowadays. Back in the 1900's it had passenger service, but there wasn't demand for a crosstown Brooklyn Line. So it became a freight line. Nowadays the trackage is being proposed for passenger service on the Triboro RX line. Also has anyone have any proposals or use for the remaining Rockaway Beach Branch. There is an unused section and I am wondering if the (MTA) is ever going to convert it into a subway line.

It's mostly overgrown with vegetation now. If they do convert it, it's likely it'll only be for recreational use. They did, however, do a study and the conclusion was that a connection between the Rockaways and the Queens Boulevard line would reduce travel times to Manhattan for Rockaway residents significantly (double digit time savings) since the current connection follows an inefficient zig-sag path to midtown Manhattan. I can't recall where I've seen it.

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Does anyone also know exactly what those tracks are for on Avenue H by the Q Avenue H station?

 

LIRr Bay Ridge Branch. Currently used by the New York Atlantic Railway for freight service. According to Wikipedia, it onced served the following stations until 1968

 

* Bay Ridge

* Third Avenue

* Brooklyn, Bath and Coney Island Railroad Crossing

* Parkville

* Manhattan Beach Junction

* Kings County Central Junction

* Vanderveer Park, originally Flatlands

* Kouwenhoven

* Rugby, originally Ford's Corners

* New Lots Road

* East New York

* Bushwick Avenue, originally Central Avenue

* Cypress Avenue, originally Dummy Crossing, then Ridgewood

* Myrtle Avenue

* Bushwick Junction, originally Fresh Pond

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LIRr Bay Ridge Branch. Currently used by the New York Atlantic Railway for freight service. According to Wikipedia, it onced served the following stations until 1968

 

* Bay Ridge

* Third Avenue

* Brooklyn, Bath and Coney Island Railroad Crossing

* Parkville

* Manhattan Beach Junction

* Kings County Central Junction

* Vanderveer Park, originally Flatlands

* Kouwenhoven

* Rugby, originally Ford's Corners

* New Lots Road

* East New York

* Bushwick Avenue, originally Central Avenue

* Cypress Avenue, originally Dummy Crossing, then Ridgewood

* Myrtle Avenue

* Bushwick Junction, originally Fresh Pond

 

Parkville : F train

Manhattan Beach Junction: Q train right?

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LIRr Bay Ridge Branch. Currently used by the New York Atlantic Railway for freight service. According to Wikipedia, it onced served the following stations until 1968

 

* Bay Ridge

* Third Avenue

* Brooklyn, Bath and Coney Island Railroad Crossing

* Parkville

* Manhattan Beach Junction

* Kings County Central Junction

* Vanderveer Park, originally Flatlands

* Kouwenhoven

* Rugby, originally Ford's Corners

* New Lots Road

* East New York

* Bushwick Avenue, originally Central Avenue

* Cypress Avenue, originally Dummy Crossing, then Ridgewood

* Myrtle Avenue

* Bushwick Junction, originally Fresh Pond

 

1968 ??? Must be Bizarro land, right ? Those stations were non-existant long before 1968 as far as the LIRR was concerned. AFAIK only the East New York station still had remnants standing in '68.

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1968 ??? Must be Bizarro land, right ? Those stations were non-existant long before 1968 as far as the LIRR was concerned. AFAIK only the East New York station still had remnants standing in '68.

 

1968 is what wikipedia said (hence the according to wikipedia line). Forgotten New York has June of 1962 (link here). If you know the date the entire line closed then by all means.....

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