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Horrific Subway Accidents Through The Years.


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Accidents in our subway are no joke and are tragic. While our subway has an admirable record, these, likely, are the most horrific:

1. The Malbone Street Disaster: November 1, 1918. 97 left us.Mr. Edward Luciano was the motorman, due to a strike against the B.R.T., of the ill-fated Brighton local-express which consisted of wood el cars. 2. The Times Square Switch Disaster: August 29. 1928. 16 left us. At approximately 4:55pm, a switch failed. After inspection, it was believed the switch would work by manual operation at trackside until repair crews could arrive. It did - for a Broadway Express gap train and most of a Broadway Express. Somehow the switch began to curve as car nine passed over. 3. The Union Square Switch Accident: August 29, 1991: 5 left us. Enough said. 4. The Williamsburgh Bridge Disaster: June 5, 1995:

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the disaster under the east river when a flushing bound (7) train's lead car was smashed to bits when a 20 foot chunk of the tunnel ceiling smashed into the car taking with it one person and injuring hundreds and trapping hundreds in the 100 degree higher temperature tunnel for 6 hours until rescuers could get into the tunnel.

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The Canarsie overshoot incident:

img_50220.jpg

img_50223.jpg

 

It wasn't that horrific, but 8277 (the car that was damaged, the one suspended in air) was the only New Tech train car that crashed.

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Then there's always the unlucky R62 car...1391

 

Years ago, it derailed but it was repaired and back in service. Then some time after that incident, it was firebombed, repaired once again and put back in service.

 

Then there was that R32 that derailed on the Franklin shuttle in the 70s (3369). They reapired that one, then renumbered it to 3348. Sadly that car is swimming with the fishes now (literally :D)

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The Canarsie overshoot incident:

 

It wasn't that horrific, but 8277 (the car that was damaged, the one suspended in air) was the only New Tech train car that crashed.

 

Looks like it must have been going pretty fast to make it that far even after the brakes were tripped by the arm if there was one installed before the bumper.

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Then there's always the unlucky R62 car...1391

 

Years ago, it derailed but it was repaired and back in service. Then some time after that incident, it was firebombed, repaired once again and put back in service.

 

Then there was that R32 that derailed on the Franklin shuttle in the 70s (3369). They reapired that one, then renumbered it to 3348. Sadly that car is swimming with the fishes now (literally :P)

 

from nycsubway.org

img_36087.jpg

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Links or a single pic would've been fine.

 

c'mon! thats ridicolous! I only put TWO images, not 12!

I think you might need a new computer or system if you have bandwith problems like that.

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An R42 (Mx) train derailed at the Chambers Street relay in 2007:

 

100_2260.jpg

 

(photo by Phillip D'Allesandro)

 

The first two cars were scrapped, and the other four sustained minor damage but were scrapped anyway. The last two cars sustained no damage at all but were scrapped. The T/O was trapped inside the cab, and was taken to the hospital after he was freed.

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1 Left Us. Mr. Layton Gibson was the T/O of an ill-fated (J) train that crashed into a stopped (M) train on the Willy B. over the East River. Car 4461 was the north motor of Train 0531-J.

 

I guess I'm just accustomed to the structurally weaker aluminum car bodies that Metrorail trains have, but it still amazes me that there was only one fatality (still unfortunate) in the Williamsburg bridge accident. Only 8-10 ft of the lead R42 car was compromised. In comparison, more than 20 ft of the lead car (Rohr built) in the June 2009 Metrorail crash was compromised. Anyone know how fast the J train was going?

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A little clarity on R32 renumberings:

Car 3669 was wrecked in Malbone II, scrapped, and its mate 3668 was renumbered 3669. This car remains in service on the C line.

 

Car 3659 was burnt in the metropolitan avenue fire, heavily damaged, but not unrepairable. It was rebuilt with the phase II R32s (I believe as a spare, as its mate was already reassigned to another wrecks mate, and was soon used to replace the damaged 3620 which was discovered to have been bent in an unknown incident. As it was made "even" they gave it an even number, 3348

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I guess I'm just accustomed to the structurally weaker aluminum car bodies that Metrorail trains have, but it still amazes me that there was only one fatality (still unfortunate) in the Williamsburg bridge accident. Only 8-10 ft of the lead R42 car was compromised. In comparison, more than 20 ft of the lead car (Rohr built) in the June 2009 Metrorail crash was compromised. Anyone know how fast the J train was going?

 

the limit over the bridge is 10 miles per hour or less going up the approach ramp where it happened.

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the limit over the bridge is 10 miles per hour or less going up the approach ramp where it happened.

 

But the T/O was going faster than the speed limit.

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That is correct. The Roosevelt Avenue IND. Mixup of May 20, 1970. This is a strange one.

A 70(GG) began having problems which became noticeable at Woodhaven Boulevard. What had occurred was brakes on car 4501 and 4500 had malfunctioned. It was decided to have the passengers leave the train and the motorman would operate the disabled train from the third car and the conductor would stand at the RFW with a flashlight to signal the motorman. All passengers left the train but one. He approached the Inspector and asked to be let off at Roosevelt Avenue.

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