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Is it just me, or are there even more R68/R68A (N) and (W) trains than there were in November? Several websites say there are only 3 shared sets, but they seem more frequent now.

 

If that's the case, from what lines are these extra R68s coming from, and where are the other R160s (the ones that the 68s seemed to displace)? 

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Is it just me, or are there even more R68/R68A (N) and (W) trains than there were in November? Several websites say there are only 3 shared sets, but they seem more frequent now.

 

If that's the case, from what lines are these extra R68s coming from, and where are the other R160s (the ones that the 68s seemed to displace)? 

 

Those extra R68/As are spares at Coney Island to fill in for R160s that need shop time I think.

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sorry, I thought there were other ways people here obtained that type of info

 (re: my post  16301 above on destination codes)

Edited by dkpintar
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sorry, I thought there were other ways people here obtained that type of info

 (re: my post  16301 above on destination codes)

 

wasn't there a whole list of r46 codes?

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There's an awful lot of construction going on in the Hudson Yards mezzanine... There's the work for the second entrance and then there's something else towards the middle with a security guard posted by the entrance. 

 

20292733_347852108981596_389914106339772

 

20258257_347852112314929_755344791670100

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Pretty sure the service now is as bad as it was in the '70s.

 

You are completely wrong!

Look at these stats! 

 

By 1985, the epidemic had not subsided at all. TA shop employees on the late shift were often used to replace broken glass in subway car windows. Between January 27th and February 2nd, 1985, 1,129 pieces of glass were replaced on subway cars that used the IRT Broadway Local, the IRT Lexington Avenue Local, and the IND 8th Avenue Local.64 In May of 1984, even the Nostalgia Train IND cars were hit by vandals.

 

The R-46 Rockwell truck fiasco continued unabated into 1980. The rate of cracks found on the trucks nearly doubled, from 889 cracks logged in February 1979 to 1,700 in March 1980.35 The R-46s had to be inspected several times a week at the TA's expense, and the TA and New York City filed suit against Rockwell, Pullman Standard and four other subcontractors for $192 million. As of March 1980, 62 R-46s were out of service due to cracks and 112 were out of service for other reasons. While the inspections caught many cracks before they became unfixable problems, on September 27th, two cracks of a type not before seen were found on the trucks.36 As a result, the TA cut the R-46 usage rate in half, and they would run only during weekday rush hours. Until this time, they were run between 6am and 10pm every day. Shuffling the R-46s in and out of the yards was causing delays throughout all the IND-BMT lines. In an effort to reduce the mileage that the R-46s ran, 144 of them were moved to the Brighton Line, but complaints from Brighton Beach residents about excessive vibration forced the TA to move them to the A and CC lines.37 Ironically, R-46s were run at all times during an acute equipment shortage during December 1980 and January 1981, due to very cold weather. Even the JFK Express was affected -- there were times in early 1981 where R-10s were making up the service! All of the R-16s, the cars the R-46s were intended to replace, were put back into service while the R-46 problems were sorted out. The problems were, besides the cracked trucks, heaters and wiring that posed fire hazards, faulty lighting and door controls. Yet there was even a TA proposal to remove the cross seats from the R-46s and replace them with side facing seats, as found in the R-27s through R-42s. In late December of 1981, the TA won $72 million in damages from Rockwell International, but the City Department of Investigation indicted seven high-ranking transit officials in connection with the planning, purchase, inspection and acceptance of the R-46 subway cars. Improprieties such as favoritism to certain contactors and mismanagement were cited. On March 8th, 1982, Rockwell paid New York City $80 million for damages that resulted from the faulty trucks.

 

By the summer of 1985, though, the overhaul program wasn't getting top billing by the press -- it was a report by the Straphangers Campaign32 that revealed:

  • ¼ of all subway cars had at least one broken door panel,
  • 1/5 of all subway cars were dark or poorly lit,
  • 1/6 of all subway cars had illegible maps or incorrect destination signs,
  • Rush hour riders traveling between 20 and 45 minutes could expect to be six minutes late 40% of the time,
  • The East Side IRT was rated best for working doors, adequate lighting and properly labeled trains, largely because of the new R-62s running on the line. The GG line had the most poorly lit and mislabeled trains, while the LL had the most missing maps and the J and M lines had the most defective doors.

Structural defects that required immediate attention were labeled as Code Red defects or "Red Tag" areas. "Immediate attention" was defined as "within 24 hours". However, there were so many structural problems throughout the entire subway system that many went unrepaired for months! 38 Code Red defects were recorded on the IRT New Lots Avenue line between the Nostrand Avenue and New Lots Avenue stations between January 1980 and July 1981; as of October 1981, fifteen of these defects had not yet been corrected.26 Some columns that supported elevated structures were so shaky that trains would not run if the wind exceeded 65 mph. This was particularly widespread the Flushing and Jamaica elevated lines.

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I noticed the MTA has been sending out a lot of emails for people to remain inside of train.My question is is there any other way to not strand passengers.Maybe let them exit somehow. Stranding people Ina tunnel is reply bad thing besides for clastraphobia (which I have) people are late to work and stuff.

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I noticed the MTA has been sending out a lot of emails for people to remain inside of train.My question is is there any other way to not strand passengers.Maybe let them exit somehow. Stranding people Ina tunnel is reply bad thing besides for clastraphobia (which I have) people are late to work and stuff.

The alternative is sending people with no safety equipment, no training and no certifications into a dark tunnel that has a live third rail and train traffic. 

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Or trying to notify the next train that there is an issue before it reaches the the next station.or making a quicker desicion to,wrong rail back to precious station.

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I like how on any updated R142 program that has 149 St-Grand Concourse as a terminal, the outside display will read "TO 149 ST" followed by "GRAND CONCOURSE" on a separate reading, as opposed to "149 ST-CONCOURSE" on one reading as it displayed previously. It's a nice touch.

 

The alternative is sending people with no safety equipment, no training and no certifications into a dark tunnel that has a live third rail and train traffic. 

And rats.

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So yesterday I checked out the stations on Sea Beach (renovated side), first it doesn’t look done and second you can see the chipped walls still with construction markings, it was unbelievable. All they’ve done at every station was install new columns. I can expect them to close down the stations on the Manhattan bound side for repairs still maybe on the weekends. But with the amount of time they had, they shouldn’t have just been standing there and there was not enough manpower cause they only had a few groups working on certain stations.

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using NYC Transit Forums mobile app

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You are completely wrong!

Look at these stats! 

 

By 1985, the epidemic had not subsided at all. TA shop employees on the late shift were often used to replace broken glass in subway car windows. Between January 27th and February 2nd, 1985, 1,129 pieces of glass were replaced on subway cars that used the IRT Broadway Local, the IRT Lexington Avenue Local, and the IND 8th Avenue Local.64 In May of 1984, even the Nostalgia Train IND cars were hit by vandals.

 

The R-46 Rockwell truck fiasco continued unabated into 1980. The rate of cracks found on the trucks nearly doubled, from 889 cracks logged in February 1979 to 1,700 in March 1980.35 The R-46s had to be inspected several times a week at the TA's expense, and the TA and New York City filed suit against Rockwell, Pullman Standard and four other subcontractors for $192 million. As of March 1980, 62 R-46s were out of service due to cracks and 112 were out of service for other reasons. While the inspections caught many cracks before they became unfixable problems, on September 27th, two cracks of a type not before seen were found on the trucks.36 As a result, the TA cut the R-46 usage rate in half, and they would run only during weekday rush hours. Until this time, they were run between 6am and 10pm every day. Shuffling the R-46s in and out of the yards was causing delays throughout all the IND-BMT lines. In an effort to reduce the mileage that the R-46s ran, 144 of them were moved to the Brighton Line, but complaints from Brighton Beach residents about excessive vibration forced the TA to move them to the A and CC lines.37 Ironically, R-46s were run at all times during an acute equipment shortage during December 1980 and January 1981, due to very cold weather. Even the JFK Express was affected -- there were times in early 1981 where R-10s were making up the service! All of the R-16s, the cars the R-46s were intended to replace, were put back into service while the R-46 problems were sorted out. The problems were, besides the cracked trucks, heaters and wiring that posed fire hazards, faulty lighting and door controls. Yet there was even a TA proposal to remove the cross seats from the R-46s and replace them with side facing seats, as found in the R-27s through R-42s. In late December of 1981, the TA won $72 million in damages from Rockwell International, but the City Department of Investigation indicted seven high-ranking transit officials in connection with the planning, purchase, inspection and acceptance of the R-46 subway cars. Improprieties such as favoritism to certain contactors and mismanagement were cited. On March 8th, 1982, Rockwell paid New York City $80 million for damages that resulted from the faulty trucks.

 

By the summer of 1985, though, the overhaul program wasn't getting top billing by the press -- it was a report by the Straphangers Campaign32 that revealed:

  • ¼ of all subway cars had at least one broken door panel,
  • 1/5 of all subway cars were dark or poorly lit,
  • 1/6 of all subway cars had illegible maps or incorrect destination signs,
  • Rush hour riders traveling between 20 and 45 minutes could expect to be six minutes late 40% of the time,
  • The East Side IRT was rated best for working doors, adequate lighting and properly labeled trains, largely because of the new R-62s running on the line. The GG line had the most poorly lit and mislabeled trains, while the LL had the most missing maps and the J and M lines had the most defective doors.

Structural defects that required immediate attention were labeled as Code Red defects or "Red Tag" areas. "Immediate attention" was defined as "within 24 hours". However, there were so many structural problems throughout the entire subway system that many went unrepaired for months! 38 Code Red defects were recorded on the IRT New Lots Avenue line between the Nostrand Avenue and New Lots Avenue stations between January 1980 and July 1981; as of October 1981, fifteen of these defects had not yet been corrected.26 Some columns that supported elevated structures were so shaky that trains would not run if the wind exceeded 65 mph. This was particularly widespread the Flushing and Jamaica elevated lines.

And I remember "The Bad Old Days" as that was actually my earliest experiences riding the subway on a regular basis (1980-early '81).  Track fires were common, doors were out, cars were dark, sometimes, trains ran with entire cars closed off as they sometimes were running stuff just to make service.   It was way worse in some cases.  

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Yesterday I heard an rare NTT announcement, "due to construction this train is being held momentarily" or something like that. Almost as rare as the "due to mechanical problems this train is out of service" announcement.

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So yesterday I checked out the stations on Sea Beach (renovated side), first it doesn’t look done and second you can see the chipped walls still with construction markings, it was unbelievable. All they’ve done at every station was install new columns. I can expect them to close down the stations on the Manhattan bound side for repairs still maybe on the weekends. But with the amount of time they had, they shouldn’t have just been standing there and there was not enough manpower cause they only had a few groups working on certain stations.

 

 

Sent from my iPhone using NYC Transit Forums mobile app

I told you for the amount of money they're spending the work looks like crap, and this is coming from someone who worked with a construction company on the insurance side.  How they're able to get away with such shoddy work is amazing, especially with the cost of the project. It's a disgrace. This is why I have a problem with the (MTA) getting more and more funding for capital projects because the work is so mediocre and within a few years the stations look like utter garbage again.

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It seems that the floor mats are on the (C) are ignored to the people riding the subway. As in, to walk to that spot. 

Edited by CH3348
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Are there any emergency walkways in tunnels in any of the subways? I know that, for example, LA has emergency walkways the length of their tunnels for evacuation in case of earthquakes and stuff.

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Are there any emergency walkways in tunnels in any of the subways? I know that, for example, LA has emergency walkways the length of their tunnels for evacuation in case of earthquakes and stuff.

Most tunnels have them along the tunnel wall (ie the local tracks on a typical four track line) but in most cases they are extremely narrow.

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They updated the FINDS on he CBTC R160s to mention the normal M at Broadway Junction and announce "M shuttle" at Myrtle Wyckoff

And the R143s still don’t announce the (W) transfer at Union.
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It was probably overlooked in the November - January updates. For the (L) route options, only one change needed to be made, to update the transfers at Union Square to include the (W). With so many unnecessary changes to the programs, like the lengthening of the text on the side signs, the important stuff, like ensuring all  the transfer announcements were correct, fell to the wayside.

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I told you for the amount of money they're spending the work looks like crap, and this is coming from someone who worked with a construction company on the insurance side. How they're able to get away with such shoddy work is amazing, especially with the cost of the project. It's a disgrace. This is why I have a problem with the (MTA) getting more and more funding for capital projects because the work is so mediocre and within a few years the stations look like utter garbage again.

I dont understand why so many are calling the renovations bad. Look, when they renovates the stations here in Rockaway, the same thing happened!! For a few months the closes each aide of the stations, took down the canopy, redid the platform and half the mezzanine at a time. Then they reopened it with only half the platform open along the length of the stations and the canopy in finished and continued work while open. So what's the big deal. Its how they chose to renovate them. Want the stations closed longer?

 

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