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East New York

"If You See Something, Say Something" Campaign Relaunched

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(MTA) - The MTA has launched its newest round of television, print and poster advertisements intended to remind customers to remain alert while using MTA services. The latest update of the MTA's award-winning "If You See Something, Say Something" security awareness campaign will appear on television and in print beginning in late April and early May. (You can see the ads here.)

 

Building on the success of earlier ads produced under the widely-recognized campaign, this new round uses stark images that renew the seriousness of the message. Prior ads portrayed images of unattended packages in transit facilities with passengers busily walking past. The new round of ads depicts what appear to be potential terrorists planting bags on subways, buses and trains.

 

 

See full story and official MTA video here.

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"We had a bomb scare in the Bronx yesterday, but it turned out to be a cantaloupe" sorry couldn't resist.

 

On other hand I think this should not be a campaign, it should be a common sense for everyone, everywhere.

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"We had a bomb scare in the Bronx yesterday, but it turned out to be a cantaloupe" sorry couldn't resist.

 

On other hand I think this should not be a campaign, it should be a common sense for everyone, everywhere.

it had turned out that way now BC every state I think copy the MTA see something say something now, i saw that in Boston ma and i was shocked lol

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The problem is who do you tell? With less and less MTA personnel and a reduction in the police force, I'm not sure this is a worthwhile expense. Use the advertising expenditure to restore station agents.

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The problem is who do you tell? With less and less MTA personnel and a reduction in the police force, I'm not sure this is a worthwhile expense. Use the advertising expenditure to restore station agents.
that's not all true, if your on any of the new trains you can just push that red button on either side of the train and it will get you the crew. If your on the platform or in any part of the subway they have the call box you can use too call for help, I used it a few times and help came asap both NYPD and MTA personal came. And they have them all over the system so you can't miss them

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One thing I dislike about this new series of commercials is that they all show someone who appears to be quite calm and relaxed planting those bags. In reality, someone planting a bomb, even if it is not a suicide bomber, would be showing a whole list of characteristic behaviors, especially sweating, nervous movements, etc. I think they could have incorporated some of that, but whatever. It still gets the main point across-call in any unattended bag.

 

As a random story-the one time I saw an unattended backpack on the street, leaning against a tree, a meter maid walked by, so I pointed it out, thinking he would call it in. Instead, he looked at it, and went "nahhh, someone probably just left it for a minute" and walked away. I guess he was right, because nothing ever happened.

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that's not all true, if your on any of the new trains you can just push that red button on either side of the train and it will get you the crew. If your on the platform or in any part of the subway they have the call box you can use too call for help, I used it a few times and help came asap both NYPD and MTA personal came. And they have them all over the system so you can't miss them

 

I was not referring to personnel aboard the trains; I was stating a fact that there has been a significant reduction in live personnel in train stations. A call box is not the same as having a station agent or officer on patrol. I'm glad that you were promptly assisted, but the reality is that there are 500 less officers now than a decade ago and station agents are becoming a rarity. Some stations, such as 155th Street on the (D), are intimidating for their size and lack of personnel. That someone will respond to a call box is reactionary as opposed to a uniformed worker who serves as a deterrent.

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