Jump to content
Attention: In order to reply to messages, create topics, have access to other features of the community you must sign up for an account.
Sign in to follow this  
Kamen Rider

document preservation; 1990 subway map that makes no sense

Recommended Posts

I have that same map as well...I don't even know how the (F) turned at Rockefeller Center unless it wrong-railed north of 34th Street or relayed at 57th Street but doesn't pick up any passengers. My guess is the train wrong-railed after leaving 34th Street to Rockefeller Center. I could be wrong, or else the map may be misprinted.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

F served Queensbridge at night. There was no Q shuttle at night. they were in fact lazy with that map. The main thing about that map being published was to show the removal of the old JFK Express which was discontinued in 1990.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I have that same map as well...I don't even know how the (F) turned at Rockefeller Center unless it wrong-railed north of 34th Street or relayed at 57th Street but doesn't pick up any passengers. My guess is the train wrong-railed after leaving 34th Street to Rockefeller Center. I could be wrong, or else the map may be misprinted.

 

F served Queensbridge at night. There was no Q shuttle at night. they were in fact lazy with that map. The main thing about that map being published was to show the removal of the old JFK Express which was discontinued in 1990.

 

i wonder that too, but according to what LRG and I added on Wikipedia four years ago (based on the information on a now closed subway history website), the (F) terminated at 47th-50th Streets/Rockfeller Center late at night following the opening of the 63rd Street Connector in October 1989 (it terminated at 57th Street-6th Avenue from 1987 to that time and ran local along Queens Boulevard to Jamaica-179th Street before Archer Avenue opened). The (Q6Av) shuttle ran from 21st Street-Queensbridge to 2nd Avenue on weekday evenings and to Broadway-Lafayette Street daily late nights. The (:P only served 63rd Street on weekends until it replaced the evening shuttle in September 1990. The (F) did not serve 63rd Street until 1991. I find this shuttle ridiculous. This service pattern also created nonsensical service along Queens Boulevard. The (G) ran to Forest Hills-71st Avenue on weekdays and cut back to Queens Plaza on evenings and weekends. However, it was extended to Jamaica-179th Street in place of the (F) during late night hours. To me, it really made no sense to cut back the line for at 8:00 p.m. every day to extend it further at midnight.

 

Damn I missed the (JFK)express.DAMN YOU (NYCTA)!!! Hit the thanks button if you agree that the individual route maps on the back of the map was a fantastic idea!!!

 

Yes I agree, and I really miss those individual maps, but I am surprised at the way you attacked the (MTA) for discontinuing the JFK Express. FYI, it was completely useless. Nobody wanted pay double fares to ride a line that neither ran frequently nor provided direct access to the airport. It also created bunching and delays on the Fulton Street Line since it ran non-stop on the express track from Jay Street-Borough Hall to Howard Beach. I do admire, however, that scene in "Home Alone 2" where Harry and Marv get off the 57th Street-6th Avenue station and we see the JFK Express decal on the entranceway.

 

Nice map, nice to see the (:P and (Mx) as 4th Avenue Express on that map.

 

I have several maps showing (Mx) express along Fourth Avenue. When it was moved from the Brighton Line to the West End Line in 1988, it ran express with the (B). It was not until 1993 that it swapped service with the (N) after Sea Beach residents said they hated the local-only service from 36th Street to 42nd Street-Times Square via Lower Manhattan and to give 4th Avenue local customers access to Nassau Street. I am surprised that during the brief time the south side of Manhattan Bridge reopened in 1990, there were three express lines and one local along Fourth Avenue. I bet it jammed the (R) and caused delays on the express tracks.

 

my mother found this in a draw in the china cabinet. It doesn't have a date other than 1990. Since in most regaurds it looks like the 1987 map, I mostly went after areas that were confusing to me.

 

Don't you think you are kind of being a bit too harsh about this issue? Mistakes on subway maps are a lot more common than you think. I have dozens of maps dating back to 1979 and a lot of them have small, but unnoticable errors. Among them include the March 1998 map saying that the (D) runs local in Manhattan (and the October one says it runs express in Brooklyn), the January 2001 map showing the (B) serving 63rd Street even though it was already removed from there in preparation of opening the connector to Queens Boulevard, the July 2001 and June 2010 maps showing (V) for lines serving Roosevelt Avenue before it was even introduced and after its elimination (the July 2001 map also did not show midday (Mx) service to Ninth Avenue) and the September 2002 map saying the (2) running express in Manhattan at all times (this was the first map showing normal service on the IRT Seventh Avenue Lines after 9/11 and the error was corrected in January 2003).

 

starting in the bottom corner of the map is anote telling you upfront "this map is wrong". the N had already been consiged to it's decade of full time Broadway local, but the map still shows it as the Broadway Express during the day.

 

depending on what month this map was printed, it may not be a mistake. There were a lot of service changes in 1990. In September, (N) service across the Manhattan Bridge was briefly restored along with express service along Fourth Avenue and Broadway, but it was sent back to the Montague Street Tunnel at all times three months later following the discovery of severe structural problems across the span.

 

DSC07341.jpg

 

There is nothing wrong with this part of the map. <7> service was suspended in the late 1980s for major repair work along the Flushing Line. When it was restored, trains bypassed 61st Street-Woodside, but complaints from residents led to restoration of express service there in 1992 or so.

 

DSC07349.jpg

 

Nothing is wrong with this section of the map. This was how the (1)(9) skip-stop service was like when it was introduced in 1989. Almost every station between 137th Street-City College and 242nd Street-Van Cortlandt Street was bypassed and service ran from about 6:30 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. on weekdays. it was not until 1994 that skip-stop service became the way it was before being discontinued in May 2005 (rush hours only with seven stations total bypassed).

 

DSC07342.jpg

 

What is the problem over here?

 

issues- late at night the last stop on the F is listed as 47th-50th..!

6th ave shuttle is shown, but listed as a short turning Q

 

The evening and late night 63rd Street shuttle at that time was labeled as (Q6Av), NOT (S6) like in 1997 and 2001, so there is nothing wrong here.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There was no late night shuttle. F/Q trains displayed a side sign along the lines of:

Q 21st Street Queensbridge, Queens- Broadway Lafayette, Manhattan

F 47/50 Street, Manhattan - Coney Island, Brooklyn

 

At Broadway Lafayette, NB F trains would change their front sign to Q, and announce that this is now an uptown Q train to 21 Queensbridge.

At 47/50, SB Q trains would change their front sign to F, and announce that this is now a downtown F train to Coney Island.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.