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What Countries Speak English?


FamousNYLover

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I know this is transit forum, but I was wondering what countries beside USA/UK, Australia/New Zealand, Iceland, Hong Kong speak English?

 

Yuki you need to change the phrase 'my mission is to help tourists' to something like I love to help tourists. It's sounds too much like a political or tv commerical. Unless you running for a political office lol.

 

 

You can also look at these other countries where the main language is English.

 

Canada, Most of the Afro-Carribean nations such as Jamaica, Trindad, Grenada, Virgin Islands and Belize. Also Scotland.

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English is a required course in most European and Asian countries in the upper grades. In most of Asian , English is everywhere...store signage , Infrastructure (required by the UN) , and other everyday life places. Its a global language , its also a living / breathing language.... Japan , Taiwan and Korea have the most detail Road signage for English drivers....

 

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sign by eesti, on Flickr

 

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Untitled by _carleton, on Flickr

 

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Which way? by Kalle Anka, on Flickr

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Yuki you need to change the phrase 'my mission is to help tourists' to something like I love to help tourists. It's sounds too much like a political or tv commerical. Unless you running for a political office lol.

 

 

You can also look at these other countries where the main language is English.

 

Canada, Most of the Afro-Carribean nations such as Jamaica, Trindad, Grenada, Virgin Islands and Belize. Also Scotland.

 

Yes, most of Canada, but that should exclude the Francophone cities like Québec City and Montréal.

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Yes, most of Canada, but that should exclude the Francophone cities like Québec City and Montréal.

 

Montreal is predominantly French but there are significant populations of English speakers there too. As for Quebec City, its more French than Paris itself.

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Montreal is predominantly French but there are significant populations of English speakers there too. As for Quebec City, its more French than Paris itself.

 

 

Yes, I know. I used to visit Montréal and while the street signs and such were in French, some of the folks do speak English or at least enough to communicate, so the trips up there were fun. Usually my Colombian/German friend was with me and his friend who is Brazilian, but both speak Spanish and several other languages like myself, so we'd all be yacking it up in Spanish, which just enhanced the French that I do know. :cool:

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Tons of people in Italy speak English, especially anyone who is trying to sell something.

 

 

That's not all that true. You can find English speakers in Rome because it's an international city, but go to places like Milan and that doesn't hold as much water. Also Venice and Florence has some English speakers, but that's because there is a strong American presence in both cities. However, even in Florence, there are some parts outside of and within Downtown where you'll need Italian. I lived in a very Italian part of Florence in that none of neighbors spoke English and tended to go to areas of Italy where English wasn't so prevelant, so maybe that's why I feel that way, but in the touristy areas like Cinque Terre, Rome, Venice, etc. you can hear some English. However, I went to places like Turin, Milan, Verona, Palermo (Sicily) which are less touristy and there I don't recall hearing any English. Occasionally, in Florence I was stopped on the street and asked if I spoke English and sometimes if I was in a good mood I would say yes and help, or I would translate between Italian and English if there was an English speaker (British or American in a bar (our equivalent of a café)).

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That's not all that true. You can find English speakers in Rome because it's an international city, but go to places like Milan and that doesn't hold as much water. Also Venice and Florence has some English speakers, but that's because there is a strong American presence in both cities. However, even in Florence, there are some parts outside of and within Downtown where you'll need Italian. I lived in a very Italian part of Florence in that none of neighbors spoke English and tended to go to areas of Italy where English wasn't so prevelant, so maybe that's why I feel that way, but in the touristy areas like Cinque Terre, Rome, Venice, etc. you can hear some English. However, I went to places like Turin, Milan, Verona, Palermo (Sicily) which are less touristy and there I don't recall hearing any English. Occasionally, in Florence I was stopped on the street and asked if I spoke English and sometimes if I was in a good mood I would say yes and help, or I would translate between Italian and English if there was an English speaker (British or American in a bar (our equivalent of a café)).

 

Well I went on a school trip to Rome and a bunch of places in soutern italy for 10 daysand at least 60% of the people spoke English.

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Antigua and Bermuda are english speaking as well. I was there in 2009 on a cruise.

 

So is South Africa, Botswana, Zimbabwe, South West Africa (i forgot its current name but Ive heard Afrikaans and German are spoken a lot there as well), and Zambia.

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Well I went on a school trip to Rome and a bunch of places in soutern italy for 10 daysand at least 60% of the people spoke English.

 

 

Yeah, like I said places that are known to be tourist spots or cater to Brits or Americans will have Italians that speak English, but step outside of those areas and you will see just how many of them speak English. Now granted Berlusconi has been pushing English for the young kids in school and such and you'll see lots of American shows on TV that are dubbed and such because Italians like British and American entertainment (i.e. music, etc.), but many of them still have a hard time with English. In sum it depends on where you go, but overall Italy is nowhere near a country like the Netherlands where a majority of its population speaks English.

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I think every country in the world should have some what of English it may not be the countries/states OFFICIAL language but I think all countries have some english speaking people and places.

 

I agree that for all offical international business English or even something like French, Spanish shouuld be created.

 

 

However people at the UN can not agree on what to eat for lunch. So an issue like that may never be agreed to.

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I agree that for all offical international business English or even something like French, Spanish shouuld be created.

 

 

However people at the UN can not agree on what to eat for lunch. So an issue like that may never be agreed to.

 

The problem is that English isn't the #1 spoken language and the U.S. won't be #1 forever economically if China has its way. In fact some have argued that Chinese should be the official language since it is spoken the most.

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There should be no official language for anything international.

 

Each language is unique and is part of a nation's culture. If you want to do business and engage in diplomacy it's fair to say you can at least meet the other person halfway or at least pony up for an interpreter.

 

Besides, language is always changing. For example say right now you pass an "international law" and make everyone speak English. Go in a cave, hook yourself up to an IV and sleep for 50 years. Bet you wake up and the people over here are speaking one language and the people over there are speaking something similar but different. Do the IV/sleep thing and hook yourself up to a fountain of youth, and wake up in 500 years...you probably won't recognize ANY of the languages.

 

It's a fruitless endeavour that will just wipe out a lot of countries' culture over something that won't last anyway (international linguistic unity)...

 

Because we all know Britain and the USA still understand Middle English right?

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