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Which stations do you think should have ADA?


j express

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I hate to say it but the others are right. All stations should be ADA accessible. I personally think you should've thought this out a bit more before posting it. We are talking about disabled people. It isn't exactly something that should be put up for a poll or anything. :tdown:

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Well, obviously, all of them would be ideal. I do think the stations that should get preference would be either the larger stations/transfer hubs with high passenger volumes, or stations located near hospitals or (possibly) seniors residences, where there are chances of more people requiring assistance (such as when elevators were installed at Flushing Avenue on the (J)(Mx)(Z) for easier access to Woodhull Medical Centre).

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I would make these stations accessible with its reasons:

 

The Bronx

Mosholu Parkway (4): for Montefiore Hospital and Tracey Towers, along with xfers from Bx1/2/10 from Riverdale and Amalgamated Housing

Parkchester/East 177th St (6): serving the heavily-elderly Parkchester complex along with xfers from Clason's Point and Bruckner Plaza via the Bx36/39

Fordham Road (:P(D): for the shopping district

Westchester Square (6): for the shopping strip, and xfers from Throggs Neck and Morris Park via the Bx40/42

 

Queens

Fresh Pond Road (M): for the shopping district and xfers from Maspeth

82nd St/Jackson Heights (7): for xfers from LGA and the high amounts of stroller moms at that station (not offending anyone)

Woodhaven Blvd (M)(R): for Queens Center and xfers from Middle Village and Mideast Queens

Astoria Blvd (N)(Q): for xfers from LGA

Lefferts Blvd/Ozone Park (A): for the shopping strip and xfers from JFK

 

Brooklyn

4th Av/9th St (F)(G)(R): for the difficult xfer between the 4th Av Line and Culver Line

 

Manhattan

86th St (4)(5)(6): for its high ridership

 

Any reactions or additions I should make?

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I hate to say it but the others are right. All stations should be ADA accessible. I personally think you should've thought this out a bit more before posting it. We are talking about disabled people. It isn't exactly something that should be put up for a poll or anything. :tdown:

 

Exactly.

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I want to know which stations do you think should have ADA

 

All of them. It baffles me how the (MTA) can renovate a station and NOT make it ADA station. Doesn't make sense to me at all.

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All of them. It baffles me how the (MTA) can renovate a station and NOT make it ADA station. Doesn't make sense to me at all.

 

Look at the Brighton stations, some places there are houses right next to the station. There might not be room to add it. Plus where is it said EVERY station must be ADA accessible? I would be fine if it is the major stops/transfer points. But stations need the basic work done first before we have elevators for every single station in the system.

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Actually, the ADA rule applies to every new station built after 1990 (when the ADA act went into effect) but you'll find stations built after 1988 ADA accesible, like the 63 St line, Jamaica Ctr, Sutphin Bl, & Jamaica-Van Wyck

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Actually, the ADA rule applies to every new station built after 1990 (when the ADA act went into effect) but you'll find stations built after 1988 ADA accesible, like the 63 St line, Jamaica Ctr, Sutphin Bl, & Jamaica-Van Wyck

 

Yes, but like I said, if this was a mandated law, the rehabbed stations on Brighton like Av U and Neck Road should've had elevators, but don't. So it seems like there are situations where a station rebuild doesn't require an elevator.

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Yes, but like I said, if this was a mandated law, the rehabbed stations on Brighton like Av U and Neck Road should've had elevators, but don't. So it seems like there are situations where a station rebuild doesn't require an elevator.

 

ADA defines "key stations" that must have elevators, plus any new station. Rehabbed stations don't need them.

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Elevators are expensive. Unless the station is heavily used or a key transferpoint, it would be overkill to have elevators at every station. People should take a bus or whatever vehicle to get to the major stop if they need the elevator. There are stations like on Sea Beach in need of repair and could use money spent to give a few stations elevators. Why shaft other stations just so the ones rebuilt now gets an elevator that may/may not be needed?

 

ADA defines "key stations" that must have elevators, plus any new station. Rehabbed stations don't need them.

 

Thank you, which shows that there has to be limits to that law.

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Every station in Manhattan south of 96 St needs ADA.

 

Not necessarily. For example, I wouldn't spend the money to make 72nd/CPW (;)(C) ADA compliant since there is a busier ADA station nearby. As a general rule, there should be at least one ADA station in a 3 mile radius of a neighborhood with subway service.

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Unless it is in Brooklyn or Queens where streets don't always run below/parallel to an el, I believe that if a bus is close by to a line, they can give people a 'lift' to the next station.

Other than if the station is an important transfer area or heavily used, I don't see the justification of expense for elevators for an otherwise lesser used station [i dunno like less than 700-900 thousand or so riders per year].

 

This has nothing to do with being insensitive to disabled riders, but elevators are NOT cheap. There are still lots of stations [like along the Sea beach line] that needs to be rehabbed and with so little funds left, some things have to be sacrificed to bring the majority of stations to at least tollerable levels.

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Unless it is in Brooklyn or Queens where streets don't always run below/parallel to an el, I believe that if a bus is close by to a line, they can give people a 'lift' to the next station.

Other than if the station is an important transfer area or heavily used, I don't see the justification of expense for elevators for an otherwise lesser used station [i dunno like less than 700-900 thousand or so riders per year].

 

This has nothing to do with being insensitive to disabled riders, but elevators are NOT cheap. There are still lots of stations [like along the Sea beach line] that needs to be rehabbed and with so little funds left, some things have to be sacrificed to bring the majority of stations to at least tollerable levels.

 

 

Disabled people need to get around also, and cuts can be made elsewhere in the capital budget so that the rehabs can be done while also putting in elevators. I see no purpose in doing total rehabs like they are on the Brighton line with no ADA access in 2011, especially when those stations won't be ADA accessible for many years to come since the rehabs in most stations are complete. The stations could be made more simpler and allow for more necessities to be implemented. The focus should be less on beautification and more on making the subway efficient and more accessible. Disabled people may seem like a "minority" but there are plenty of them with needs to get around and they should not be ignored or seen as less needy because of their disability.

 

 

I care more about clean stations and running subways than expensive mosaics and such. A station like South Ferry which was just done a few years ago is a perfect example of waste. All of that money spent and the station is already falling apart. The lack of maintenance in the long run leads to higher expense costs later because the stations have to be rehabbed quicker and take more to rehab them in terms of time as well as money.

 

Another reason I say this is because the (MTA) has done very little overall to speed up buses to give folks who can't use the subway a quick alternative, so some sort of compromise should be made. Either spend the money to make the buses quicker, or spend the money to make more stations ADA accessible.

 

You could also argue that they should take a taxi, but many of them aren't ADA accessible either, so again some compromise needs to be made.

 

The overall disability rate in the U.S. is 19.4%, which is not a small number when talking about the total U.S. population. Also, I think many folks just assume that there aren't many disabled folks because they don't "look" disabled. As people live longer there will be more and more of a necessity to make transportation more accessible and the status quo that the (MTA) has been using just won't suffice.

 

If artwork and the like is so important to the (MTA), then they should become more creative so that it can be implemented at little or no cost so that more pressing issues can be addressed. Perhaps they could work out something and get artwork donated or given to them and the artists involved can have their works exposed.

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No, it's nice to have an aesthetically pleasing subway station. Who says you can't have both a clean and running subway and mosaics?

 

Bronx

 

I would not make any Concourse (;)(D) stations ADA since Fordham on the (4) is ADA and 161st is also ADA. I would make either Westchester Square or Parkchester (6) ADA. I've heard rumors that Hunts Point is receiving ADA.

 

Manhattan

 

It's good that they added elevators to 135 Street (2)(3) since it's next to Harlem Hospital. If possible, I would make 145 Street (A)(;)(C)(D) ADA. I would not make any Upper East Side Lexington Avenue stations ADA since there are a bunch of bus lines in that area (including the M15 SBS) and the Second Avenue Subway is being built.

 

1st Avenue (L) should be ADA-it's next to Stuyvesant Town and Beth Israel Hospital. 2nd Avenue (F) should be ADA.

 

Queens

 

Astoria/Ditmars Blvd (N)(Q) should be ADA. Woodhaven Blvd/Queens Center Mall (M)(R) should be ADA-it's next to the mall and has several bus connections. I would not make any Jamaica Avenue El stations ADA since it runs parallel to the Q56. Lefferts Blvd (A) may be getting ADA. Far Rockaway may also become accessible.

Brooklyn

 

The layout at Broadway Junction makes it impossible to add elevators to the (J)(Z) and (L), though the (A)(C) might be able to add elevators if a second mezzanine was built. Pennsylvania Avenue (3) should be ADA since there are several bus connections. Kings Highway (:)(Q) may be getting ADA. Brighton Beach should be ADA- a lot of elderly Russian seniors live in that area. 36 Street (D)(N)(R) should be ADA.

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In my opinion all stations should be ADA accessible, but one my priorities is the Coney Island-Stillwell Avenue Station (D)(F)(N)(Q), because in the summer a lot of tourists and regular people visit the Beach, and it would be extremely helpful in helping people access the amusements and attractions around there.

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All stations should eventually be made ADA compliant.

That said, the order in which I would do it would have to do with three factors:

1. Stations near places with high numbers of elderly/disabled.

2. Stations with high ridership.

3. Stations easy to convert.

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