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Tinamarie

Question about the M train

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I know the (M) doesn't really run on weekends, but doesn't it run all day between Metro-Ave to Myrtle-Ave/Bway? I ask because I'm going to the city today and I don't trust the (L) train to be working. I don't want to take the dreaded shuttle bus.

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You could take the (M) to the (J) at Myrtle Avenue/Broadway. If you need Midtown, you can take the (J) to Manhattan to connect to the (N)(Q)(R)(6) at Canal Street, Essex Street for (F), or Chambers Street for (4)(5)(6)

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Yes, all weekend the (M) only runs between Metro Av and Myrtle Av- Bway. As for your trip I would suggest taking the (M) to Myrtle-Bway and then take the (J) into the city. If my suggestion doesn't work, then someone should be able to help you.

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Yeah that's what I might do. Because it says the (L) is running on shuttle buses or something and it does say from 1130pm to 5am but I don't trust that. I'm probably going to take the (J) to the (F). No problem.

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After riding the extended (M) yesterday, it would seem that weekend service is more than warranted. I rode the full length of the line during different times of the day and it was quite full. I understand that the (M) had some (L) riders, but it wasn't that significant. Many riders rode beyond the transfer points as well. In my opinion, with the gentrification of Williamsburg, Bedford-Stuyvesant, and Bushwick (and other points east), the demand for Midtown service during weekends is there.

 

Moreover, with gas prices at sky-high levels and traffic flow decreasing with DOT projects (e.g. bike lanes, pedestrian malls, narrower lanes, construction, Select Bus lanes, etc.), mass transit is in a unique position to attract even more riders which would help generate more revenue. This is what happened in the late 1980s; as investments were made with service enhancements, ridership increased and an agency that was crippled with deficits ended up with surpluses.

 

One key element is to make mass transit as convenient and practical as possible including weekends. The second is to relentlessly advertise how much time and gas is saved by riding. My only complaint on the weekend (M) was the wind noise as we passed the vehicular traffic stalled on the Willy B!

 

Just my two cents!

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After riding the extended (M) yesterday, it would seem that weekend service is more than warranted. I rode the full length of the line during different times of the day and it was quite full. I understand that the (M) had some (L) riders, but it wasn't that significant. Many riders rode beyond the transfer points as well. In my opinion, with the gentrification of Williamsburg, Bedford-Stuyvesant, and Bushwick (and other points east), the demand for Midtown service during weekends is there.

 

Moreover, with gas prices at sky-high levels and traffic flow decreasing with DOT projects (e.g. bike lanes, pedestrian malls, narrower lanes, construction, Select Bus lanes, etc.), mass transit is in a unique position to attract even more riders which would help generate more revenue. This is what happened in the late 1980s; as investments were made with service enhancements, ridership increased and an agency that was crippled with deficits ended up with surpluses.

 

One key element is to make mass transit as convenient and practical as possible including weekends. The second is to relentlessly advertise how much time and gas is saved by riding. My only complaint on the weekend (M) was the wind noise as we passed the vehicular traffic stalled on the Willy B!

 

Just my two cents!

 

Good point but....

 

The reason the Emm-Tee-Yaa dont want to spend the extra money is because they will need more C/R's, rewriting the work program, re-doing the timetable,Having more trains run, oh you get the idea...

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There were plenty of (L) riders not just a few (shuttle buses galore), and 57-6 can't be maintained as a terminal either ((F) delays galore in both directions), its either the full length or uptown (nay) or bust. Plus it was a very nice day and the subways this time of year on weekends are crowded anyway (as they will be next weekend for the PR parade), so one can't really look at one day as a smoking gun for weekend regular (M) service. Most of the crews yesterday were transferred over from the (L) line, I just had a nice two tripper :P

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After riding the extended (M) yesterday, it would seem that weekend service is more than warranted. I rode the full length of the line during different times of the day and it was quite full. I understand that the (M) had some (L) riders, but it wasn't that significant. Many riders rode beyond the transfer points as well. In my opinion, with the gentrification of Williamsburg, Bedford-Stuyvesant, and Bushwick (and other points east), the demand for Midtown service during weekends is there.

 

Moreover, with gas prices at sky-high levels and traffic flow decreasing with DOT projects (e.g. bike lanes, pedestrian malls, narrower lanes, construction, Select Bus lanes, etc.), mass transit is in a unique position to attract even more riders which would help generate more revenue. This is what happened in the late 1980s; as investments were made with service enhancements, ridership increased and an agency that was crippled with deficits ended up with surpluses.

 

One key element is to make mass transit as convenient and practical as possible including weekends. The second is to relentlessly advertise how much time and gas is saved by riding. My only complaint on the weekend (M) was the wind noise as we passed the vehicular traffic stalled on the Willy B!

 

Just my two cents!

 

The only reason the (M) was "packed" was because the (L) wasn't capable of going to Manhattan. Plus, the MTA has no plans to better subway service anytime soon as right now they're trying to reverse a lot of mistakes they made with the bus network (e.g. X37/38).

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After riding the extended (M) yesterday, it would seem that weekend service is more than warranted. I rode the full length of the line during different times of the day and it was quite full. I understand that the (M) had some (L) riders, but it wasn't that significant. Many riders rode beyond the transfer points as well. In my opinion, with the gentrification of Williamsburg, Bedford-Stuyvesant, and Bushwick (and other points east), the demand for Midtown service during weekends is there.

 

Moreover, with gas prices at sky-high levels and traffic flow decreasing with DOT projects (e.g. bike lanes, pedestrian malls, narrower lanes, construction, Select Bus lanes, etc.), mass transit is in a unique position to attract even more riders which would help generate more revenue. This is what happened in the late 1980s; as investments were made with service enhancements, ridership increased and an agency that was crippled with deficits ended up with surpluses.

 

One key element is to make mass transit as convenient and practical as possible including weekends. The second is to relentlessly advertise how much time and gas is saved by riding. My only complaint on the weekend (M) was the wind noise as we passed the vehicular traffic stalled on the Willy B!

 

Just my two cents!

 

Great point Sam! Thus i have suggested as a compromise that the overnight/weekend (M) terminal should be Essex St. I know they have to bulid a new switching area for the center tracks there but the advantage is that it creates a permament off peak location in which Mytrle Ave riders have a 24/7 connection to the (F) 6th Ave line.

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There is no need to rebuild the Essex Street station.

 

Basically track wise the Essex Street station is similar to the Whitehall Street station, that is two tracks (off the Williamsburg Bridge) become three for a two platform/three track station, and resume being a two-track line (leaving Bowery Place). However one added feature is that there are turn-off tracks for the Sixth Avenue line. In addition, generally Manhattan bound tracks tend to use a single platform, while trains bound for Queens use the center platform that has access to 2 tracks.

 

Unless they have removed the track switch nearest the Williamsburg Bridge, trains coming off that bridge can be routed to the middle track - the capability has existed for ages.

 

Now some would say that Queens bound J-trains "have" to use the center track, while the M-train "has" use the outer Queens bound track. That is not actually the case. Upon leaving the Bowery station there is a track switch to the outer platform that joins the track from Sixth Avenue. Meaning that both Queens bound J and M trains can enter Essex Street on the same outer track - something that the station was capable of for ages.

 

So in order to make the "Essex Street bound M-trains" work - those M-trains coming off the Williamsburg Bridge simply have to switched to the middle track, and upon leaving (train operator changes to the end of the train) and the train switched to the Queens bound track (just like regular J-trains today). It is not difficult at all - no fuss, no muss.

 

Mike

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There is no need to rebuild the Essex Street station.

 

Basically track wise the Essex Street station is similar to the Whitehall Street station, that is two tracks (off the Williamsburg Bridge) become three for a two platform/three track station, and resume being a two-track line (leaving Bowery Place). However one added feature is that there are turn-off tracks for the Sixth Avenue line. In addition, generally Manhattan bound tracks tend to use a single platform, while trains bound for Queens use the center platform that has access to 2 tracks.

 

Unless they have removed the track switch nearest the Williamsburg Bridge, trains coming off that bridge can be routed to the middle track - the capability has existed for ages.

 

Now some would say that Queens bound J-trains "have" to use the center track, while the M-train "has" use the outer Queens bound track. That is not actually the case. Upon leaving the Bowery station there is a track switch to the outer platform that joins the track from Sixth Avenue. Meaning that both Queens bound J and M trains can enter Essex Street on the same outer track - something that the station was capable of for ages.

 

So in order to make the "Essex Street bound M-trains" work - those M-trains coming off the Williamsburg Bridge simply have to switched to the middle track, and upon leaving (train operator changes to the end of the train) and the train switched to the Queens bound track (just like regular J-trains today). It is not difficult at all - no fuss, no muss.

 

Mike

 

Maybe you don't need the new switches/signals at Essex. Excellent points Mike.:tup:

 

However if the (MTA) never wants the (B39) to ever return at very least they should make Essex/Delancey Station ADA accessible.

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