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Question for motormen and train ops...


TrainFanatic

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Is the Train Operator Display in the NTTs accurate and usefull?

 

(T/O) When stationary, its of virtually no use at all. When something goes wrong (BIE for instance) we have to look at it as its supposed to tell us what car (or cars or piece of cars) are giving trouble. When moving, it is helpful as we can easily find out the other end's motor (we know our own of course) in case Control Center requests it (rare but does happen). It also has a distance counter which is roughly accurate when working properly. This helps us resume allowable speed in areas where resume markers are in the wrong spots or not posted at all and signals are too far apart to use those, and can provide for a faster ride thats equally as comfortable and safe. Places that come to mind that have misplaced or no resumes (Going into 60th tube from 11st cut, Crescent st curve u can resume about 400 feet sooner saving almost 30 secs, leaving 59 heading toward 6Av).

 

(C/R) When moving, next station name is given, although its not completely accurate depending on the train. When there's a problem, the C/R can give the operating motor to RCC instead (the entire consist is displayed) themselves instead of bothering the T/O to give it to them. While in the station its totally useless unless someone used the PEI and the C/R (or T/O for that matter) can see which end of which car summoned them.

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(T/O) When stationary, its of virtually no use at all. When something goes wrong (BIE for instance) we have to look at it as its supposed to tell us what car (or cars or piece of cars) are giving trouble. When moving, it is helpful as we can easily find out the other end's motor (we know our own of course) in case Control Center requests it (rare but does happen). It also has a distance counter which is roughly accurate when working properly. This helps us resume allowable speed in areas where resume markers are in the wrong spots or not posted at all and signals are too far apart to use those, and can provide for a faster ride thats equally as comfortable and safe. Places that come to mind that have misplaced or no resumes (Going into 60th tube from 11st cut, Crescent st curve u can resume about 400 feet sooner saving almost 30 secs, leaving 59 heading toward 6Av).

 

(C/R) When moving, next station name is given, although its not completely accurate depending on the train. When there's a problem, the C/R can give the operating motor to RCC instead (the entire consist is displayed) themselves instead of bothering the T/O to give it to them. While in the station its totally useless unless someone used the PEI and the C/R (or T/O for that matter) can see which end of which car summoned them.

 

What's BIE?

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(T/O) When stationary, its of virtually no use at all. When something goes wrong (BIE for instance) we have to look at it as its supposed to tell us what car (or cars or piece of cars) are giving trouble. When moving, it is helpful as we can easily find out the other end's motor (we know our own of course) in case Control Center requests it (rare but does happen). It also has a distance counter which is roughly accurate when working properly. This helps us resume allowable speed in areas where resume markers are in the wrong spots or not posted at all and signals are too far apart to use those, and can provide for a faster ride thats equally as comfortable and safe. Places that come to mind that have misplaced or no resumes (Going into 60th tube from 11st cut, Crescent st curve u can resume about 400 feet sooner saving almost 30 secs, leaving 59 heading toward 6Av).

 

(C/R) When moving, next station name is given, although its not completely accurate depending on the train. When there's a problem, the C/R can give the operating motor to RCC instead (the entire consist is displayed) themselves instead of bothering the T/O to give it to them. While in the station its totally useless unless someone used the PEI and the C/R (or T/O for that matter) can see which end of which car summoned them.

 

Thanks. :cool: Are they the most "funnest" or interesting cars to operate?

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I wasn't around for the slants or R44s I personally like R46s and R68A (Those A's can be a pain to operate, but the funnest thing when they do what u expect them to do). I think the 68A is the only train u can enter at 50mph and still make a station stop.

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This is the truth about the 68A...

 

As you probably know train has two braking systems, dynamic and friction. The when braking, the train only uses friction below 10mph (more like 5 but officially it says 10). There was a modification done to the 68A where there's a delay between an INITIAL service break request whether dynamic of friction (initial meaning can't release it all always gotta hold some) and the brake actually taking hold. With that said, generally speaking it has the best dynamic brake in the system (better than the 160s and we all know how people charge into stations with those) and with the really good trains no other train type comes close (save high end 160s and well maintained 32s). With those trains, one can enter faster and take brake later than with other train types. Its a timing thing with the delay, whereas with other trains brake comes right when you request it. There's a delay too with the R68, but less than the 68A.

 

I came into Newkirk (:P(Q) northbound at 49mph on the downgrade last April (coast 1 signal outside the station, taking brake at the head). Requested 60lbs of break (no full service needed), about 2/3's in dropped it down to 30 than 20 and stopped right at the [10]. Halfway in (C/R board) was still doing about 35mph. Of course can't do this in the fall with the infamous Brighton leaves.

 

Another example. Entered Ave J at 41mph northbound. Took a 40lb break 1/3 in, it kicks in around the c/r board. Release some (never all) break, stop at the 10 with about 15-20 lbs. Takes some "cahones" and experience to operate those trains like that, it really takes months to even some years as every 68A is different, no two SMEE trains operate exactly alike, the same train don't even operate the same on each end.

 

It's all about train control and confidence. The R68A is a piece of crap train when you're not used to it and you've been on NTT and SMEE types where the break comes right away.

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See thats why I like those cats on the (:P some T/O's brake well with them I enjoy them storming in Fordham and Tremont(in both directions going to school/home) coming in 110th N/B and flying in W4.The 68's braking isn't too bad either.

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Of course. R160's are nothing more then upgraded R68's with new technology.

 

I like the 68a i came into fordham at 45 the other day. I took 20lbs as soon as i entered and let the dynamics work for me. I dropped it down to 10lbs as i got near my mark and mad the stop with 15lbs. I really like the 32s but the ACs suck ass. Its too dam hot to be in that tin can. The 160s are nice and smooth.

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I like the 68a i came into fordham at 45 the other day. I took 20lbs as soon as i entered and let the dynamics work for me. I dropped it down to 10lbs as i got near my mark and mad the stop with 15lbs. I really like the 32s but the ACs suck ass. Its too dam hot to be in that tin can. The 160s are nice and smooth.

 

After you come to a full stop in a station, do you have to keep holding the dynamic brake, or is there some sort of "parking brake" or whatever?

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After you come to a full stop in a station, do you have to keep holding the dynamic brake, or is there some sort of "parking brake" or whatever?

 

You can place the brake handle in "full service" and let go of the deadman's handle for a bit to relax.

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You can place the brake handle in "full service" and let go of the deadman's handle for a bit to relax.

 

you can. but i just held the 15 that way i can get out of the station fast.

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I like the 68a i came into fordham at 45 the other day. I took 20lbs as soon as i entered and let the dynamics work for me. I dropped it down to 10lbs as i got near my mark and mad the stop with 15lbs. I really like the 32s but the ACs suck ass. Its too dam hot to be in that tin can. The 160s are nice and smooth.

S**T I probably catch you or TwoTimer going to school b\c I be having some kickass T/O's on the (:(.Coming in Fordham S/B not braking till they're about at least 1 car in.

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Another question: you know when a train arrives at the last stop (especially on NTTs) a sound is heard and then the doors don't open right away. Like this

 

If you're talking about at 2min 35 sec the train is being dumped.And the crew is getting their shit ready then they open.

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What does that mean?

Discharging the train basically shutting it down like how a car turns off(turn the keys take the key out) except its done differently.I didnt explain this well b\c I can't think of the words I want to use.:(:P

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It sound happens because the brakes are being placed in "Emergency" position on the NTT's and on the SMEEs, the brake handle has to pass the "Emergency" position to get to the "Handle Off" position.

Then, the doors don't open right away because the conductor is moving back and forth between the two operating positions to set up for the next conductor on the train and to get his stuff. Then, the conductor opens up the doors.

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