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About curves


Abba

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If a well experienced driver feels he can go very fast by a curve is he allowed to go past the speed limit if he feels? Last week At Nevins Street the driver left the station like a regular speed which is unusual.

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If a well experienced driver feels he can go very fast by a curve is he allowed to go past the speed limit if he feels? Last week At Nevins Street the driver left the station like a regular speed which is unusual.

 

Nope. Speeding if there was a radar gun around. Many T/O get away with the curves leaving (Nevins comes to mind, so does Brighton Beach and Simpson) if no TSS was observed on the platform, and at Nevins St since there are no supervision there anymore (there used to be a TD and two Tw/O), more liberties may be taken. However, at Nevins all that has to be done is for the TSS to stay in the underpass and when the train begins to depart come up the stairs and gun the back of the train. Similar setup at Brighton Beach, can just gun from the dispatcher office. Can just come out from the booth at Simpson and gun the back of the train there as well. And those are the sneaky ones cause that's when you get that nasty call at the terminal.

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As for Brighton Beach, It's funny because you have those that follow the speed limit for a few cars around the bend and then then wrap it up and those that don't even hesitate to keep it wrapped up all through the bend - love it!

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I thought that if a T/O disobeys a speed limit he/she will get tripped by the timer/wheel detector?

 

And ONLY if there is a timer in the area (wheel detectors are only one when going over a switch).

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As for Brighton Beach, It's funny because you have those that follow the speed limit for a few cars around the bend and then then wrap it up and those that don't even hesitate to keep it wrapped up all through the bend - love it!

 

Well there actually is a resume out there i guess the first piece of the bend really is the sharpest.

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Nope. Speeding if there was a radar gun around. Many T/O get away with the curves leaving (Nevins comes to mind, so does Brighton Beach and Simpson) if no TSS was observed on the platform, and at Nevins St since there are no supervision there anymore (there used to be a TD and two Tw/O), more liberties may be taken. However, at Nevins all that has to be done is for the TSS to stay in the underpass and when the train begins to depart come up the stairs and gun the back of the train. Similar setup at Brighton Beach, can just gun from the dispatcher office. Can just come out from the booth at Simpson and gun the back of the train there as well. And those are the sneaky ones cause that's when you get that nasty call at the terminal.

 

Simpson? Simpson Street on the (2) & (5)? i have never seen any TSS there when Trains are leaving and take the curve. plus Many of these curves are not as sharp as one might think. some curves have a limit of 20 but some T/O's take it up to 25. but one thing for T/O's how do they know when they clear a curve? is there a resume speed sign or the dispatcher calls them? how do they know when they clear a curve?

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Simpson? Simpson Street on the (2) & (5)? i have never seen any TSS there when Trains are leaving and take the curve. plus Many of these curves are not as sharp as one might think. some curves have a limit of 20 but some T/O's take it up to 25. but one thing for T/O's how do they know when they clear a curve? is there a resume speed sign or the dispatcher calls them? how do they know when they clear a curve?

 

They either approximate the train distance or there is a resume speed sign.

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Theres this short curve on the (C) where 32's are going at least 40 then slowing down to about 15-20 its btwn Lafayette Av and Hoyt-Schermerhorn local track Manhattan bound the T/O's come around that curve btwn 38 and 42 then brake hard before the switches.Its not a sharp curve but its a curve non the less.

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The T/O's usually speed like crazy around the curve just before/after Hunterspoint (South end). As for the north end, they usually do go slow, but not always...

 

Here are some other places that T/O's like to speed on curves:

+South end of Court Square, IRT Flushing line (7)<7>

+125 Street, IND CPW line ((A)(:P©(D)), South end.

+Spring Street, IRT Lexington Avenue line ((4)(5)(6)<6>)

+Curve between Cortlandt Street & City Hall, both ways.

+Williamsburg Bridge, 2nd curve coming out of the southbound platform @ Marcy Avenue ((J)(M)(Z))

+This is rare: North end just after Myrtle Av-Bway (after (M) has switched over and is curving onto Myrtle Av line)

+This is rare: North & South ends of Grand Central-42 Street (4)(5)(6)<6>

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When Manhattan bound (7) trains leave Hunters Point Av, they speed like crazy when going over the curve. I always hear a SQUEEEK SQUEEEEEEEEK.

Flushing bound trains are normal there. What bugs me is that annoying SQUEEEEEEEEEEK.

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Nope. Speeding if there was a radar gun around. Many T/O get away with the curves leaving (Nevins comes to mind, so does Brighton Beach and Simpson) if no TSS was observed on the platform, and at Nevins St since there are no supervision there anymore (there used to be a TD and two Tw/O), more liberties may be taken. However, at Nevins all that has to be done is for the TSS to stay in the underpass and when the train begins to depart come up the stairs and gun the back of the train. Similar setup at Brighton Beach, can just gun from the dispatcher office. Can just come out from the booth at Simpson and gun the back of the train there as well. And those are the sneaky ones cause that's when you get that nasty call at the terminal.

 

This, so much. There's this one interval on the (5) going to school in the morning where it just swings around the curve after Nevins like a pro and never slows down. Every time I'm on a (4) or (5) that goes slowly on that curve after Nevins, I die a little bit inside :P

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Let me chime in about the IRT situations mentioned. Nevins St n/b on the local or express tracks has a posted speed of 10 mph leaving the station. The resume marker for both tracks is just south of the Hoyt St station, It is at that point where an operator can resume normal speed. Leaving Fulton St n/b on the Lexington line there is a speed restriction, a resume marker, and a 16mph speed restriction entering the Brooklyn Bridge station. Again, leaving Brooklyn Bridge AND Grand Central there are speed restrictions around those curves. Finally, leaving Simpson St n/b there are timers on the middle track and a speed restriction on the local track with a resume at the bridge overpass between Simpson and Freeman Streets. I believe the OP asked if an experienced T/O could disregard those signs if he/she thought it was safe to do so. The answer is N.O.. Anyone who says or does otherwise is breaking the rules and extremely unprofessional. Basically to me it represents improper and unsafe operation. If I was a passenger on a train operating in such a manner I would probably discreetly tell the T/O to slow down. I have done so in the past. If an RTO supervisor would observe the same behavior the consequences could be much worse. It may seem "cool" or "fun" to a buff but operating a train is not supposed to be either. Professional is what it's supposed to be. Carry on.

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Well said Trainmaster. People seem to loose sight of the fact that trains can hold nearly 1,000 people on them and that is a hell of a lot of live to be responssible for.

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Let me chime in about the IRT situations mentioned. Nevins St n/b on the local or express tracks has a posted speed of 10 mph leaving the station. The resume marker for both tracks is just south of the Hoyt St station, It is at that point where an operator can resume normal speed. Leaving Fulton St n/b on the Lexington line there is a speed restriction, a resume marker, and a 16mph speed restriction entering the Brooklyn Bridge station. Again, leaving Brooklyn Bridge AND Grand Central there are speed restrictions around those curves. Finally, leaving Simpson St n/b there are timers on the middle track and a speed restriction on the local track with a resume at the bridge overpass between Simpson and Freeman Streets. I believe the OP asked if an experienced T/O could disregard those signs if he/she thought it was safe to do so. The answer is N.O.. Anyone who says or does otherwise is breaking the rules and extremely unprofessional. Basically to me it represents improper and unsafe operation. If I was a passenger on a train operating in such a manner I would probably discreetly tell the T/O to slow down. I have done so in the past. If an RTO supervisor would observe the same behavior the consequences could be much worse. It may seem "cool" or "fun" to a buff but operating a train is not supposed to be either. Professional is what it's supposed to be. Carry on.

 

Exactly "Buff" Feelings will GET YOU FIRED down here...

 

Obey the Speed signs...

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