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xloakedx

Middle track on the G line??

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Looks just like a switch extension with a section between 2 platforms for added flexibility.

 

- Ady

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Oh okay, thought maybe it might have been built for future plans back when the IND was first built for the crosstown G and was just left over since then.

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The center track splits into two tracks just behind the station, which both descend to a lower level, allowing the two split tracks to dip eastwards under the Crosstown line. This was probably a provision for building a connection from the Crosstown Line eastwards to the then yet-to-build IND Second System lines coming from South 4th St.

 

The line would've continued eastwards under Lafayette Avenue and then joined either the IND Myrtle Avenue line, or the IND Stuyvesant Avenue line, or even both, in the Brooklyn Broadway area.

 

I don't know if this was planned as a revenue passenger line to/from Downtown Brooklyn or just as a connection for work trains or getting trains to/from the yards.

 

In the end, this is what the building of the first IND lines was all about: making provisions for future system expansion wherever possible so additional lines could be connected more easily with the existing system.

 

You can see the planned IND second system lines on this map here:

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/d9/1929_IND_Second_System.jpg

 

Who knows, maybe this was even a late-minute, "just-in-case" provision if the IND wouldn't have the money for building the South 4th St main line anymore, they could still build the Myrtle Ave and Utica Ave lines and connect them to Manhattan via the Crosstown line and Hoyt-Schermerhorn...

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It's interesting that you ask this question. I've been doing a little research into history of NYC transit, and what I found is quite interesting.

 

The photo in the aformentioned post shows the subway pans in August of 1929. The Bedford-Nostrand Station opened on August 1, 1937. At this time, the Board of Transportation was exploring the posibility of bying the BMT. So when the station finally opened, the NYBOT began to build tracks that would extend east into Bushwick to connect with the BMT's Kosciuszko Street station. The idea was abandoned because they would be competing directly with The Coney Island & Brooklyn Railroad company, which at the time operated street cars on De Kalb Av. Less than 3 years later on June 1, 1940 the NYBOT changed it's name to NYCTA, and on the same day bought the BMT, and CIBR. In 1945 they entertained the thought of finishing the tracks, but instead decided in 1949 to dismantle the De Kalb AV Streercar. Since the street was no longer two-way, the TA favored creating the B38 route, that used newer buses from the BMT's well maintained fleet.

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It's interesting that you ask this question. I've been doing a little research into history of NYC transit, and what I found is quite interesting.

 

The photo in the aformentioned post shows the subway pans in August of 1929. The Bedford-Nostrand Station opened on August 1, 1937. At this time, the Board of Transportation was exploring the posibility of bying the BMT. So when the station finally opened, the NYBOT began to build tracks that would extend east into Bushwick to connect with the BMT's Kosciuszko Street station. The idea was abandoned because they would be competing directly with The Coney Island & Brooklyn Railroad company, which at the time operated street cars on De Kalb Av. Less than 3 years later on June 1, 1940 the NYBOT changed it's name to NYCTA, and on the same day bought the BMT, and CIBR. In 1945 they entertained the thought of finishing the tracks, but instead decided in 1949 to dismantle the De Kalb AV Streercar. Since the street was no longer two-way, the TA favored creating the B38 route, that used newer buses from the BMT's well maintained fleet.

 

That explains the 4 tracks. I wonder what it'd be like if the original "grand plan" was implemented. They should have a line that runs really deep that goes the length down the geographical center of the manhattan landmass, with part time stations in central park. Then have half circle lines that intersect at the same deep level and also connect with the lines closer to the surface. A line connecting GCT and penn station with no stops in between would also rock. Eventually deeper level tunnels will probably have to be constructed, but i think an elevated line would have better chances before that.

 

- Andy

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This is really whats so mysterious about the (G) Line. Is there anything about the extra space at Classon Ave. though? There's room in the middle for an extra track.

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This is really whats so mysterious about the (G) Line. Is there anything about the extra space at Classon Ave. though? There's room in the middle for an extra track.

 

Express service on the (G) is possible, if the track has never been removed in the first place. The (G) occasionally has two sections meeting there during construction.

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Express service on the (G) is possible, if the track has never been removed in the first place. The (G) occasionally has two sections meeting there during construction.

 

A really good example of how much planning and stop-starting subway construction has gone through.

 

- Andy

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I think that is what makes the IND the best part of the subway. I was built with provisions and switches every where. Look at the 8Th Ave line, there are so many places were switches were originaly located. I think the IND was very well planned out, but it is such a shame they ran out of money for the second system.

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I think that is what makes the IND the best part of the subway. I was built with provisions and switches every where. Look at the 8Th Ave line, there are so many places were switches were originaly located. I think the IND was very well planned out, but it is such a shame they ran out of money for the second system.

 

I am sure at some point there will be more crosstown service in manhattan aside from the (L)(7) and (S). It would make sense to put something in like that after the SAS is completed or nearing completion.

 

- Andy

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I could easily see one on 125th Street, perhaps they will extend the (T) westbound to 12th Avenue

 

I think that would be a very smart idea, just make it low enough towards WTC or south ferry to help with congestion on the (A)(C)(E) and (1)(2)(3).

 

Currently to get to 2nd ave you take a (4)(5)(6) to the station nearest your destination and walk several blocks from there, but a lot of people take the (E) or (1) depending on where they are originating, and then taking the (S) to GCT to get (4)(5)(6) stops north of 59th street 5th av which is served by (N)(R)(W) trains. I don't think people realze that it won't just take pressure off the lexington line, but also the (1)(2)(3)(7)(A)(C)(E)(N)(R)(W) and (L). in the area west of where the other lines serve and south of central park.

 

- Andy

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