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vorellanaj

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Hello to all community. I'm Victor Hugo Orellana, I'm from Chile. I'm bus fan and since 2000 and bus spotter 5 years later, when I bought my 1st digital camera.

 

I can show to everyone how bus transportation in my country. It's very different to US transportation. There're no US buses here today unless some US school bus who are donated to several schools, municipalities and charity organizations.

 

Mainly, chilean buses come from Brazil, one of the most important countries who build bus bodyworker and bus chassis in mass-production.

 

Also, I have a Chilean bus gallery and some areas in the world. The URL address is http://www.biooctavabuses.cl . Unfortunately, the website isn't available in English, due most of Chilean people only speak Spanish. :(

 

Thanks for the oportunity to participate in this forum.

 

Victor Hugo Orellana

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Thanks for your regards.

 

I have plans to go to United States (first to Miami and then to New York City), but I'm waiting the Visa Waiver Program applies to Chile (Chile is postulating to the program) , around 2-3 years. If wouldn't happen, I'll apply to Visa Program in US Embassy.

 

Greetings from Chile.

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Veo que no eres el único que habla español. Soy hablante nativo , pero estoy mejorando mi nivel en el idioma inglés.

 

Someone don't understand the two last posts?

I see that you're not the only one that speaks Spanish. I'm a native Spanish speaker, but I'm improving the way how I speak English.

 

I speak Spanish too, and a fluent one. Do I get a cookie?

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I see that you're not the only one that speaks Spanish. I'm a native Spanish speaker, but I'm improving the way how I speak English.

 

I speak Spanish too, and a fluent one. Do I get a cookie?

 

Jajaja... ¿Y dónde naciste? So, that means you speak Spanish, English and Spanglish right? B)

 

Bienvenido a los foros. Nacío en Perú, su vecino al norte (Pero ahora vivo en NYC).

 

Perdón si mi español no esta muy bien. Ha sido años desde que yo he vivido en Perú.

 

Jajaja... Look at you putting on the tildes... ;) It's nice to see someone else besides myself who knows the codes to put them on. Hay que seguir practicando el español porque si no, ya sabes lo que pasa. You know what they say... If you don't use it you lose it. :eek:

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Bienvenido a los foros. Yo nací en Perú, su vecino al norte (Pero ahora vivo en NYC).

 

Perdón si mi español no esta muy bien. Ha sido años desde que yo he vivido en Perú.

Minor error in bold, but your Spanish is actually good.

 

Jajaja... ¿Y dónde naciste? So, that means you speak Spanish, English and Spanglish right? B)
Both, except for Spanglish. Actually, before I even took Spanish 3, I spoke Spanglish all the time. When I realized that Spanglish words were not "official" (is Spanglish even official? In my opinion, I think not ;)), I stopped speaking that way and focused on perfecting the language itself. That's how I took AP Spanish in 2009. The best part was that I didn't even study for tests because I aced them with high scores. :tup:
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Minor error in bold, but your Spanish is actually good.

 

Both, except for Spanglish. Actually, before I even took Spanish 3, I spoke Spanglish all the time. When I realized that Spanglish words were not "official" (is Spanglish even official? In my opinion, I think not B)), I stopped speaking that way and focused on perfecting the language itself. That's how I took AP Spanish in 2009. The best part was that I didn't even study for tests because I aced them with high scores. :tup:

 

Yeah, he has another error, but it's minor. Missing tilde over "esta"... (está bien) and NYC should really be Nueva York, but NYC is understood... I'm confused, so are you Latino or what's the deal? As a linguist and a Spanish and Italian teacher for years, I can assure you that Spanglish is not an official language. It's just a mix of Spanish and English. I find that some people use it because either they're trying to gossip and don't want others hearing so they'll switch to Spanish here and there or they just don't know the right word in Spanish.

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Yeah, he has another error, but it's minor. Missing tilde over "esta"... (está bien)... I'm confused, so are you Latino or what's the deal? As a linguist and a Spanish and Italian teacher for years, I can assure you that Spanglish is not an official language. It's just a mix of Spanish and English. I find that some people use it because either they're trying to gossip and don't want others hearing so they'll switch to Spanish here and there or they just don't know the right word in Spanish.
Yes, I'm Hispanic, and Spanish is my fluent language. I don't like Spanglish at all because it's a lazy way to speak Spanish/English. I mean, is it difficult to say "appointment" properly in Spanish instead of pronouncing it to make it look like a Spanish word? That's just one example, but there are more words that are used incorrectly.
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Yes, I'm Hispanic, and Spanish is my fluent language. I don't like Spanglish at all because it's a lazy way to speak Spanish/English. I mean, is it difficult to say "appointment" properly in Spanish instead of pronouncing it to make it look like a Spanish word? That's just one example, but there are more words that are used incorrectly.

 

lol... Where abouts are you from? I have Latino friends from the Caribbean as well as from Latin America and I enjoy chatting with them esp when drinking because they start to use slang and such. My Venezuelan, Colombian and Chilean friends are esp. funny.

 

I think it's just a habit though. My Dominican roommate back in college would go on with a whole convo in Spanish and then suddenly break into English. I used to get annoyed. I'd tell him either speak in English or speak in Spanish. :mad: Sometimes I can understand though. You can get a mental block. Like right now I'm chatting with a friend of mine in Italian and she and I will use some words in English because Italian borrows from so many languages that it's just easier when having a convo. Many words we don't have an Italian equivalent for so we just use English or whatever word. Just about all of our computer terms are English words. Don't know why either. B)

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Thanks to all for my welcome.

 

I think it's hard to learn Spanish in a person who hasn't got any Spanish education in his infancy. I think the people in California , Florida have a bit of advantage to learn them because there're a lot of native Spanish people in those states (Mexican and Cubans mainly).

 

Due to high Latin American influence in USA actually, it's necessary to American native people to learn Spanish (if only for understanding, elemental level). It's reverse in Latin American countries. For example, in Chile, English is obligatory for Elemental and High School Students, but 80 percent of students didn't pass the exam applied by Chilean government.

Conclusion : Poor English education in public schools, but in private schools (specially in two-language schools (English, German, French, Italian schools)) results were better.

 

One test of that is in the street. When US tourists are in Chile touristing (without understanding Spanish), they have several problems to communicate with people , for example, a 25-year tourist went to buy apples and he finished buying bananas. (The reason is the seller doesn't understand English).

 

Other case is another tourist , he had gone to a travel agency to requesting help, but the person who attended the tourist didn't know English very well, so another employer in the travel agency could to help to the tourist.

 

English and Spanish are very strong languages in the world.

 

Greetings from Chile.

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Thanks to all for my welcome.

 

I think it's hard to learn Spanish in a person who hasn't got any Spanish education in his infancy. I think the people in California , Florida have a bit of advantage to learn them because there're a lot of native Spanish people in those states (Mexican and Cubans mainly).

 

Due to high Latin American influence in USA actually, it's necessary to American native people to learn Spanish (if only for understanding, elemental level). It's reverse in Latin American countries. For example, in Chile, English is obligatory for Elemental and High School Students, but 80 percent of students didn't pass the exam applied by Chilean government.

Conclusion : Poor English education in public schools, but in private schools (specially in two-language schools (English, German, French, Italian schools)) results were better.

 

One test of that is in the street. When US tourists are in Chile touristing (without understanding Spanish), they have several problems to communicate with people , for example, a 25-year tourist went to buy apples and he finished buying bananas. (The reason is the seller doesn't understand English).

 

Other case is another tourist , he had gone to a travel agency to requesting help, but the person who attended the tourist didn't know English very well, so another employer in the travel agency could to help to the tourist.

 

English and Spanish are very strong languages in the world.

 

Greetings from Chile.

 

I think it all comes down to how often you use the language. For example, I spent my infancy in Peru (my first words were mama and papa), but when I came to the U.S, I didn't really have any chance to speak Spanish. My mother tried to continue speaking to me in Spanish, but since everybody I spoke to spoke English, I often ended up responding in English. As a result of having relatively little Spanish contact (other than my relatives calling once a week), I think my abilities have declined. I think that I am only slightly above the level that an intellectual-type high school student would at.

 

I think a part of it was pressure from the English-speaking part of my family to assimilate into U.S culture.

 

The good thing is that at least having the foundation of speaking Spanish, I was able to do very well in Italian.

 

I guess once you have a good foundation in one Latin-based language, it is easier to learn other languages. I'm sure Via Garibaldi's experience speaking Italian helped him when he learned Spanish and Portuguese.

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