Jump to content
Attention: In order to reply to messages, create topics, have access to other features of the community you must sign up for an account.
Sign in to follow this  
SouthernRailway

Jointed rails

Recommended Posts

Why does the NY Subway still use jointed rail, rather than welded rail?

It makes for a rockier and bumpier ride than smooth welded rail.

 

I took the Charlotte light rail line this weekend and the tracks are as smooth as silk, with welded rail.

 

If the difference is "Charlotte is above ground but NY is below ground"- FYI even the above-ground N line has jointed rail.

 

Thanks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The subway uses alot of welded rail, but there are places like elevated structures where you can't use that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Why does the NY Subway still use jointed rail, rather than welded rail?

It makes for a rockier and bumpier ride than smooth welded rail.

 

I took the Charlotte light rail line this weekend and the tracks are as smooth as silk, with welded rail.

 

If the difference is "Charlotte is above ground but NY is below ground"- FYI even the above-ground N line has jointed rail.

 

Thanks.

they do use welded on the elevated lines they just did the WPR line btwn freemen st and 174th st and it is very smooth now, they are using it all over now as they do the new track work

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I bet the (MTA) doesn't like to use welded rail because it is more expensive to weld together a rail rather than to bolt it down. Also, when doing trackwork & removing / replacing the rails, it is much easier to unbolt and lift off the Joint rather than to saw it off.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Why does the NY Subway still use jointed rail, rather than welded rail?

 

They can't just replace all the tracks at once with welded rail tracks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

I bet the (MTA) doesn't like to use welded rail because it is more expensive to weld together a rail rather than to bolt it down. Also, when doing trackwork & removing / replacing the rails, it is much easier to unbolt and lift off the Joint rather than to saw it off.
thats not all true the way i see it all the areas they are doing track work or did already they are using welded rails now more on the IRT lines but all lines are doing it now

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

From Wikipedia:

 

"The first welded track was used in Germany in 1924 and the US in 1930[5] and has become common on main lines since the 1950s."

 

So the NY Subway is just 60 years behind other railroads in adopting welded rail?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When they replace the bolted rails with welded ones, you lose that ability to know a train is coming from the vibrating rails on the bolts, which I think is too bad.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Every "chip out" as we call it welded rail is replacing traditional rail, one area to test out the difference is to ride between Prince and 8th northbound (especially on an (N) so you can open the storm door) and hear the difference.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Every "chip out" as we call it welded rail is replacing traditional rail, one area to test out the difference is to ride between Prince and 8th northbound (especially on an (N) so you can open the storm door) and hear the difference.
and on the 7ave line btw 42nd st and 72nd nb and sb exp track mostly Edited by chrisliz09

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
When they replace the bolted rails with welded ones, you lose that ability to know a train is coming from the vibrating rails on the bolts, which I think is too bad.

Yeah bc if someone is on the tracks they know when a trains coming.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Why does the NY Subway still use jointed rail, rather than welded rail?

It makes for a rockier and bumpier ride than smooth welded rail.

 

I took the Charlotte light rail line this weekend and the tracks are as smooth as silk, with welded rail.

 

If the difference is "Charlotte is above ground but NY is below ground"- FYI even the above-ground N line has jointed rail.

 

Thanks.

 

Well you can't really compare a Light Rail to Heavy-Duty Rail. Also it is only about 4 years old, so it's all pretty new track, it should be smooth lol. Compared to the subway which is above 100 years old.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Well you can't really compare a Light Rail to Heavy-Duty Rail. Also it is only about 4 years old, so it's all pretty new track, it should be smooth lol. Compared to the subway which is above 100 years old.

 

I don't know what the weight of the rails on both systems would be but the Norfolk Southern and Amtrak lines I've taken all are mainline, with rail weights likely as heavy if not heavier than the NYC Subway rails would be, and they are also welded rail.

 

The subway system is 100 years old but the rails themselves are not; they are replaced regularly.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

on the (N)(R)(Q) going SB from 57 St-42 St, the track seems pretty smooth except when approaching 42 Street...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I don't know what the weight of the rails on both systems would be but the Norfolk Southern and Amtrak lines I've taken all are mainline, with rail weights likely as heavy if not heavier than the NYC Subway rails would be, and they are also welded rail.

 

The subway system is 100 years old but the rails themselves are not; they are replaced regularly.

 

NYCT uses both 100 Lbs. and 115 Lbs. rail. Most mainline freight uses 150.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.