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Andres

Train Braking Questions

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i have a few questions.

 

1. How do T/O's know when and where while entering a station to start braking?

 

2. How is it figured out how much braking power you need to reach the designated marker?

 

3. Whats the speed limit entering a station to e able to stop on 10?

 

4. ive heard people talking about braking and they have mentioned something about 10 pound reduction and so forth. wat does that mean?

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Answer to 1. I think they brake when they see a signal. Otherwise they brake when they can see the station. Some T/O's are on this forum.

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i have a few questions.

2. How is it figured out how much braking power you need to reach the designated marker?

 

3. Whats the speed limit entering a station to e able to stop on 10?

 

 

 

2.Depends how fast that operator is coming in the station.

3.Speed Limit its really no limit unless there is a Timer or the signal ahead is occupied(red).Some stations trains come in 45 some stations trains barely hit 30.

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i have a few questions.

 

1. How do T/O's know when and where while entering a station to start braking?

 

2. How is it figured out how much braking power you need to reach the designated marker?

 

3. Whats the speed limit entering a station to e able to stop on 10?

 

4. ive heard people talking about braking and they have mentioned something about 10 pound reduction and so forth. wat does that mean?

 

1. When they get used to the route, they'll know. Otherwise, some people just brake at the beginning or before the platform to be safe.

 

2. It really isn't figured out. Each train operates differently.

 

3. Some guys be doing 47 or so *cough*

 

4. That's for equipment with AMUE braking.

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How do they know?

Do you drive a car? How do you know when to brake for a light?

It all boils down simply to experience. The more experience, the better and smoother and more efficient you get.

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How do they know?

Do you drive a car? How do you know when to brake for a light?

It all boils down simply to experience. The more experience, the better and smoother and more efficient you get.

 

they know don't worry about it..

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4. ive heard people talking about braking and they have mentioned something about 10 pound reduction and so forth. wat does that mean?

 

In an automatic air system, a reduction of pressure calls for an application of the brakes. We'll say that in release, the main reservoir has 70 pounds in it. When you move the brake handle over to the apply position, this pressure will drop. I won't bother explaining what happens inside the individual portions, but this procedure admits air into the brake cylinder, pushing the shoes against the wheels.

 

This is the type of braking used on R1-9s, Lo-Vs, Hi-Vs, El cars, etc. "SMEE" type cars use an entirely different method of braking.

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i have a few questions.

 

1. How do T/O's know when and where while entering a station to start braking?

 

Well some T/O's start braking when at least one car of the train arrives at the station.

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1. How do T/O's know when and where while entering a station to start braking?

 

It depends on equipment being operated and the speed they're going.

90% of the time if the train is going below 30MPH the operator won't cut out until about 2 or 3 cars in(coasting) then they'll start braking.

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Might be a little off topic but whats the speed limit with yellow (caution) flags?

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Might be a little off topic but whats the speed limit with yellow (caution) flags?

 

Rule 3.82(a) train operators upon encountering any caution lights or flags on the track on which they are operating must immediately adjust the speed of their trains to not more than 10 miles per hour, sound 2 long blasts of the train horn or whistle as warning to personnel at the point of the work or obstruction and be prepared to stop within one-half their range of vision....

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Well since we're on the topic of braking I might as well piggyback off this one...

 

How does the snow brake help stop the train? I already know what its used for but how does it affect the braking power of the train?

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Well since we're on the topic of braking I might as well piggyback off this one...

 

How does the snow brake help stop the train? I already know what its used for but how does it affect the braking power of the train?

 

It doesn't stop a train, it prevents a build up of ice between the brake pad and the rail by holding a small brake (6 to 8PSI on an NTT) application. The heat will keep away ice. I guess if the train is going slow enough, it would stop the train.

Edited by INDman

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i have a few questions.

 

1. How do T/O's know when and where while entering a station to start braking?

 

2. How is it figured out how much braking power you need to reach the designated marker?

 

3. Whats the speed limit entering a station to e able to stop on 10?

 

4. ive heard people talking about braking and they have mentioned something about 10 pound reduction and so forth. wat does that mean?

 

 

1. you have to feel it.

2. you have to feel it.

3. every station is different.

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i have a few questions.

 

1. How do T/O's know when and where while entering a station to start braking?

 

2. How is it figured out how much braking power you need to reach the designated marker?

 

3. Whats the speed limit entering a station to e able to stop on 10?

 

4. ive heard people talking about braking and they have mentioned something about 10 pound reduction and so forth. wat does that mean?

 

usually, you stop taking power before entering a station and start braking just before being 1/2 way in the station.

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usually, you stop taking power before entering a station and start braking just before being 1/2 way in the station.

 

Ha i knew you would find this place sooner or later... ;)

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Ha i knew you would find this place sooner or later... ;)

 

Thanks. I've been reading the posts here for the longest time. I couldn't resist a comment about braking.

 

I remember a TSS saying, "brake hard at the conductors board" at most stations. Not sure they'd teach that today.

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I remember a TSS saying, "brake hard at the conductors board" at most stations. Not sure they'd teach that today.

When operators come in 155th St (:P(D) from the tube thats where it seem like they brake about 2 maybe 3 or 4 cars in.

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When operators come in 155th St (:P(D) from the tube thats where it seem like they brake about 2 maybe 3 or 4 cars in.

 

Its coming up the grade there, so even though they hitting the platform at 40 (just like hitting the platform at W4 at 45+), the grade is in favor so less brake/brake later is the course of action.

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Its coming up the grade there, so even though they hitting the platform at 40 (just like hitting the platform at W4 at 45+), the grade is in favor so less brake/brake later is the course of action.

LOL true but every time that makes me nervous it feels faster all that swaying.Reminds of of 110th N/B from 103rd the 32's and 68's nearly hit 40 even though its a downhill with slight curves they don't brake till there about 2 cars in.

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What alot of people do not know is that the braking of a set of railcars can be greatly effected by how many dead motors if any exist in the consist.

For example if the consist is made up of 10 railcars and 3 cars toward the operating car have dead motors then the rear cars are pushing the front cars and the operator needs to take that into consideration. If the dead motor or motors are toward the rear of the consist then the front cars are pulling that dead weight and depending on the specifics of the dead motor dynamic braking may also be lost.

 

And yes control center does sometimes allow a consist to stay in service if it has a dead motor or motors when they feel it is ok.

Another thing to remember is that an operator does not always know a dead motor exists when they have one. Remember that when riding a line and you feel what is called a bucking motion.

For example there was once a 10 car consist reported for a bucking motion others were boggled for a day trying to find out why. Well my friends when a skilled professional walked into the shop he he he found that there were 5 cars with dead motors that others thought could not be possible. Honestly the fact that this happened with the dead motors and it being overlooked was sad but i have no more to say.

P.S dead motors do not always have dead motor lights illuminated.

So i guess i did have more to say. lol

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